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NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
JULY CAME EARLY THIS YEAR with hot and muggy weather on Memorial Day, and the weather is expected to remain that way until Tuesday night, when showers or a thunderstorm are forecast to hit the area. The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat warning for Memorial Day and Tuesday, prompting the city to activate its summer heat programs that zero in on seniors and the homeless. Temperatures hit a high of 91 at 3:59 p.m. (the low of 68 degrees clocked in at 5:31 a.m.)
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Shannon Pettypiece and Michelle Fay Cortez, BLOOMBERG
  An $80 million national research plan to attack Alzheimer's, a mind-robbing malady that may affect as many as 16 million Americans by 2050, will start this year with U.S.-sponsored studies on ways to prevent the disease in high-risk people and treat it with an insulin nasal spray. The National Institutes of Health will spend $7.9 million researching the spray and $16 million on the first study to focus on growth of the disease in high-risk patients, according to a statement today by Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Powerful storms stretching from the Gulf Coast to the Great Lakes wrecked several Indiana towns and killed at least 20 people Friday as the system tore roofs off schools and homes, flattened a fire station, flipped over tractor-trailers, and damaged a maximum-security prison. It was the second deadly tornado outbreak this week. Authorities reported 14 deaths in southern Indiana, where Marysville was leveled and nearby Henryville also sustained extreme damage.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When casino mogul Sheldon Adelson wrote a $5 million check this month to a super PAC backing his close friend Newt Gingrich, it was the largest donation the executive had ever made to a candidate in an election cycle. Aides close to the 78-year-old billionaire, whose company, Las Vegas Sands Corp., owns the Sands Bethlehem Casino Resort, about an hour's drive from Philadelphia, say the contribution reflects Adelson's penchant for making high-risk bets - with high payoff. It also showcases the growing influence of super PACs on the presidential campaign.
NEWS
November 14, 2011
A glass of red wine can warm the heart on a chilly fall evening, and some data show it will also improve your cardiovascular health. But women who take one sip may no longer deserve to wear that pink ribbon. Even moderate drinkers are encouraging the enemy - breast cancer - at least according to the latest news from the Journal of the American Medical Association. A recent study shows that even one drink a day can raise a woman's risk by 15 percent. The findings come from a large study that followed 105,986 nurses over 28 years.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poverty, long known to be a major factor behind the HIV epidemic in urban areas, is such a powerful force that income and related measures are better predictors of who will get infected than whether a person exchanges sex for money, according to a new federal study of heterosexuals in 24 cities. The study, published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was too small to break out findings on Philadelphia or the other cities. But it helps explain why Philadelphia has some of the highest HIV rates in the country, as Philadelphia is among the most impoverished of big cities.
NEWS
February 21, 2011
THE CENTER FOR Public Integrity is starting an ambitious national project - believed to be the first of its kind - to identify risks of public corruption in each state based on laws on the books and how they're enforced. Pennsylvania will show itself to be at very high risk indeed. Right now we've got two former legislative leaders (Democrats Mike Veon and Vince Fumo) in prison; one former legislative leader (Republican Jane Orie) on trial; and two former legislative leaders (Republican John Perzel and Democrat Bill DeWeese)
NEWS
August 26, 2010
An outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened hundreds of people who ate bad eggs should prompt the Senate to stop sitting on legislation to give the Food and Drug Administration more clout. But instead of its watered-down version that has been collecting dust, the Senate should adopt a House bill passed a year ago. More than 1,300 recent salmonella cases have been linked to contaminated eggs. FDA officials say those illnesses, and the subsequent voluntary recall of a half-billion eggs, might have been avoided if it had the power to inspect agribusinesses before an outbreak and to order product recalls when necessary.
NEWS
August 2, 2010 | By VALERIE RUSS, russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987
ABDUL WASHINGTON spent much of Saturday, June 19, grilling in back of his Logan home for his wife's 36th birthday. And because Father's Day was the next day, he'd planned a big celebration. "I invited the whole block," Lakeisha Kellam, Washington's wife, said at their home on Franklin Street near Rockland. The party began about 4 in the afternoon, said Washington, 31, and several families spilled out of their homes, sharing food and laughs on their stoops as kids played basketball in the street.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
Four years after industry officials persuaded Congress and the Department of Homeland Security to accept watered-down regulations on securing chemical plants from terrorists, they're urging federal officials to once again kick the can down the road. One proposal in the Senate would even renew these flawed rules for five more years. That's an imprudent strategy, though, for safeguarding millions of Americans from the risks posed by hundreds of plants where dangerous chemicals are processed or in use. Plant safety rules that will expire in October simply aren't doing the job - which is why Congress must strengthen them now. For instance, even the mandated government inspection of high-risk facilities lags far behind schedule.
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