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High Risk

NEWS
October 4, 2005 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a new twist to flu season, New Jersey and Pennsylvania health officials yesterday urged people at highest risk for influenza complications to queue up first for a vaccination this month. Almost everyone else should wait until Oct. 24. The two-phase approach is recommended by the federal government to ensure that the most vulnerable people - generally the elderly, young children, caregivers and those with chronic illness - will be vaccinated this year. The change arose because of shortfalls in vaccine supply in recent seasons, including last year when about half the nation's flu vaccine failed to appear because of quality problems at Chiron Corp.
NEWS
August 1, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just before Tatiana Behrmann moved to Bryn Mawr in June, her Florida doctor diagnosed her with gestational diabetes and told her to find another obstetrician here quickly. More than a month later, Behrmann, 29, was still searching. Due in September, she called doctor after doctor but few could see her before the end of the summer. Those who did turned her away for malpractice reasons because she was high-risk. "It was crazy, I even went to Planned Parenthood, thinking that if anyone would see me, they would, but they don't do prenatal care," said Behrmann.
NEWS
July 20, 2005 | By Jack Levin
Joseph Edward Duncan 3d, who allegedly bludgeoned to death three people in northern Idaho and kidnapped two children, killing one of them, represents a tremendous challenge to our legal system. What are we to do with a sex offender who has served his sentence but is likely to repeat his offense? Duncan did 15 years for raping a 14-year-old boy and had been released on bail on a charge of molesting a 6-year-old boy. For every repeat offender who turns his life around, there are several others such as Duncan who commit more hideous crimes.
NEWS
July 11, 2005 | By Frank Kummer and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
From South Jersey to the Shore, Camden City by far has the most sex offenders considered likely to repeat their crimes, according to an Inquirer analysis of the state's sex-offender registry. In all, there were a total of 779 high-risk sex offenders in eight southern counties, according to the study. Those high-risk offenders are classified as Tier II or Tier III (the highest) and are listed in the New Jersey Sex Offender Internet Registry compiled by the state police. Camden had 109 of those offenders - more than any other municipality in the counties the newspaper analyzed.
NEWS
July 2, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The state Legislature gave final approval yesterday to bills that would require satellite tracking of high-risk sex offenders, create a $200 million housing fund for the mentally ill, and allow voting by absentee ballot for any reason. Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey is expected to sign the measures. The Assembly voted 80-0 to establish a $3 million, two-year pilot program to monitor 250 sex offenders. More than 200 are deemed at the highest risk of re-offending. The other offenders who would be tracked are designated as moderate risk but are still a concern to authorities.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
An Assembly panel yesterday approved a bill that would allow satellite tracking of high-risk sex offenders, but a parole official testified that the effectiveness of the program would not be as dramatic as some lawmakers had suggested. Meanwhile, the mother of Megan Kanka - the 7-year-old Mercer County girl whose 1994 rape and murder inspired the creation of sex-offender registries across the country - testified that the measure "doesn't go far enough" in the number of sex offenders it would cover.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
Son was responsible for checking on father In a March 16 article on the discovery of a man 10 days dead ("Questions linger over man's death"), the deceased's son railed against the manager of the West Chester residential complex where his elderly father had lived. "We're furious about what happened," he said. "Somebody ought to be responsible. " I agree. And who better than one of the old man's seven children. How difficult is it to call your old dad once a day? Did he live too far from his children for casual drop-in visits?
NEWS
March 14, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, before he had his breasts removed, Alex Fox started having chest pain in the office. He panicked. Fox was a smoker, and the testosterone he took also increased his risk for a heart attack. But his boss didn't know that Fox, a transgender man, had a woman's body under his work clothes. Fox knew he should call 911, but he didn't, fearing how paramedics would react to the 38Ds he was hiding with a compression vest. Instead, sweating profusely, he marched into his boss's office and lied.
NEWS
February 5, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Montgomery County Health Department is now offering influenza vaccine to anyone, on a walk-in basis. Free inoculations will be given from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays at the county's three health centers: 1430 DeKalb St., Norristown; 364 King St., Pottstown; and 102 York Rd., Suite 401, Willow Grove. Also, a flu clinic will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at the Upper Merion Township building, 175 W. Valley Forge Rd., King of Prussia. Last fall, flu shots were reserved for senior citizens, the very young, and those with chronic ailments after a British company's supply of the vaccine was found to be contaminated, limiting the number of shots available for the American public.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In discussing whether Terrell Owens' injured ankle will allow him to play in the Super Bowl on Feb. 6 against doctor's advice, Eagles trainer Rick Burkholder talked yesterday about trying to balance risks and rewards. For each of the parties involved, the risk-reward calculation is different. So, too, are the responsibilities: ethical, legal and personal. The player wants to perform on the nation's biggest stage, knowing that the opportunity might never come again and that his quick return from the sidelines carries with it a risk of reinjury.
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