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High Risk

NEWS
March 14, 2005 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, before he had his breasts removed, Alex Fox started having chest pain in the office. He panicked. Fox was a smoker, and the testosterone he took also increased his risk for a heart attack. But his boss didn't know that Fox, a transgender man, had a woman's body under his work clothes. Fox knew he should call 911, but he didn't, fearing how paramedics would react to the 38Ds he was hiding with a compression vest. Instead, sweating profusely, he marched into his boss's office and lied.
NEWS
February 5, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Montgomery County Health Department is now offering influenza vaccine to anyone, on a walk-in basis. Free inoculations will be given from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays at the county's three health centers: 1430 DeKalb St., Norristown; 364 King St., Pottstown; and 102 York Rd., Suite 401, Willow Grove. Also, a flu clinic will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday at the Upper Merion Township building, 175 W. Valley Forge Rd., King of Prussia. Last fall, flu shots were reserved for senior citizens, the very young, and those with chronic ailments after a British company's supply of the vaccine was found to be contaminated, limiting the number of shots available for the American public.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In discussing whether Terrell Owens' injured ankle will allow him to play in the Super Bowl on Feb. 6 against doctor's advice, Eagles trainer Rick Burkholder talked yesterday about trying to balance risks and rewards. For each of the parties involved, the risk-reward calculation is different. So, too, are the responsibilities: ethical, legal and personal. The player wants to perform on the nation's biggest stage, knowing that the opportunity might never come again and that his quick return from the sidelines carries with it a risk of reinjury.
NEWS
November 30, 2004 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The state's human-services commissioner yesterday announced new child-protection measures following the revelation that a 14-month-old boy starved to death after a caseworker had visited his home. James M. Davy announced the changes at a news conference in which he named a medical director for New Jersey's troubled child-welfare system. Davy said he hoped the new position, filled by Connecticut pediatrician Joseph Jacobs, would guard against cases like that of Jmeir White, who weighed 10 pounds when emergency workers found him dead Aug. 22 in an Asbury Park apartment.
NEWS
November 11, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Bucks County Health Department will administer 2,400 doses of flu vaccine at three sites throughout the county, officials said yesterday. Until now, the Health Department had no vaccine to offer, said Gordian V. Ehrlacher, the county's public health administrator. The county had ordered all of its vaccine from Chiron Corp., whose shipments were discontinued last month because of problems at its British plant. The new supply came from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, but is still 5,600 doses shy of what the county had ordered from Chiron.
NEWS
November 4, 2004 | By Peter J. Daley
It's a story that's becoming all too familiar: a record flu-vaccine shortage - half the nation's expected 100 million doses are unusable - with many high-risk patients, many of them elderly, waiting in long lines but unable to get a flu shot. Nonetheless, public health experts and others such as Tommy Thompson, the U.S. health and human services secretary, say we're not facing a public health crisis despite the staggering shortfall in flu vaccine. I disagree. This is a public health crisis that needs to be addressed - now, not later.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Health-care professionals in New Jersey could be fined $500 for giving the flu vaccine to someone not in a high-risk group, under an order expected to be issued as early as today. Gov. McGreevey yesterday signed a law directing the commissioner of the Department of Health and Senior Services to issue the order spelling out who can get the vaccine during this season's shortage. The order, which was being finalized yesterday, also would give the commissioner the power to redirect shipments of the vaccine to ensure it reaches those who need it most.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Health-care providers in New Jersey would be penalized for giving flu shots to those not in high-risk groups, and orders of the vaccine could be redistributed by the state under a bill passed yesterday. If Gov. McGreevey signs the bill, New Jersey would join a growing number of states that have attached penalties to the violation of federal guidelines for who should be vaccinated during the nationwide flu-shot shortage. The state would be the only one, however, to address the situation through legislation rather than direct action by the government, the National Conference of State Legislatures said.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Jane Eisner
For Allison Oler, the severe shortage of influenza vaccine is more than a story on the nightly news. As the mother of three children, she knows that her house will be incapacitated for a week if - or is it when? - the flu arrives. Worse, as a primary-care physician, she has several thousand high-risk patients who are now without an inoculation that could save their lives. Five years ago, there wasn't much interest in the vaccine; now it is more precious than a winning lottery ticket, and its distribution seems just as random.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Department of Public Health exhausted its flu vaccine supply yesterday after inoculating just a fifth of the needy patients it had planned to help. The announcement yesterday forced the city to shut down the immunization program at its district health centers. But officials said there was still hope that more supplies would arrive. "There is no reason to panic or for hysteria," said Health Commissioner John F. Domzalski. The shutdown could have a big effect on the health of vulnerable residents if it holds.
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