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High School Baseball

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NEWS
January 3, 1986 | By Francis M. Lordan and David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writers
A former South Jersey high school baseball star was critically wounded Wednesday when he was shot in the head by another man inside a Cherry Hill residence, authorities said yesterday. Thomas Heinkel, 19, a Villanova University freshman, was shot about 9 a.m. with a .22-caliber rifle at a residence on West Point Drive, Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell said. Heinkel was being kept alive on a respirator last night at West Jersey Hospital, Eastern Division, in Voorhees Township, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not as rare as a lunar eclipse. Maybe not worth a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records. But a 1-0 game is fairly unusual in high school baseball. "You really don't see very many, do you?" asked Pennsbury coach Vic Napolitano, following the Falcons' shutout of Bensalem last Thursday. "It turned into a pretty good game. "The pitching was outstanding. There were blown opportunities, but what the hell. " It had a few elements you seldom find in high school baseball: good pitching, good defense plus a timely, late-inning, game-winning hit. It also had a few elements you almost always find in high school baseball: poor hitting, poor fielding, runners left to die on the basepaths.
SPORTS
January 22, 2006 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 300 Skip Wilson fans - family, friends and ex-players - were in Horsham Friday night to honor the man who spent 46 years as Temple baseball coach before deciding in August to call it a career. "The impression he made on me was that there was more to life than baseball," said former Phillies general manager Ed Wade, who was master of ceremonies. "That you had to prepare yourself for life after school, and to be dedicated to whatever you decided to do. " Big-leaguer Bobby Higginson and former major-leaguers Jeff Manto and John Marzano also attended.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Andrew Whitman was tired of getting a bunch of friends together to chase down fly balls whenever he wanted to take batting practice. There had to be an easier way. Now there is. A batting cage. For the last few months, Andrew, 12, has been able to whack away in a chain-link enclosure all by himself, hitting pitches fired at him by a pitching machine. He no longer has to chase after his hits or get his buddies to do it. Since late spring, Andrew has been a faithful visitor to the new Lenola Fields batting cages in Moorestown.
SPORTS
August 1, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DONALD HOOTEN is in a war against steroids. His son, Taylor, played high school baseball in Plano, Texas. In 2003, he was withdrawing from steroids when he hung himself. He was 17. In 2005, Hooten appeared before congressional hearings that featured the likes of Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. He told his son's story. Congress, he said, listened attentively. And then? "They did nothing," Hooten told the Daily News last night. "We find ourselves 8 years later, and MLB is now No. 1 in youth education on performance-enhancing drugs and we can't get anything out of our federal government.
SPORTS
June 22, 1987 | By LES BOWEN, Daily News Sports Writer
Frankford High baseball coach Dick Connolly thinks high school baseball talent from the tri-state area gets a bad rap. For every Mike Scioscia (Springfield-Delco, the Los Angeles Dodgers) and Jeffrey Leonard (Overbrook, the San Francisco Giants), Connolly says there are other area kids who might have the talent but never get the chance to play in college or professionally. That feeling, in a roundabout way, had a lot to do with the founding of the 12-team Carpenter Cup Classic all-star high school baseball tournament that began this morning and runs through Sunday at Veterans Stadium.
SPORTS
August 6, 1988 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Andy McNab's high school baseball career in Canada was so abbreviated, he missed it without even blinking. One. That's how many games were played by St. Mary's High in Hamilton, Ontario, from which McNab graduated last spring and to which he'll return this fall. "There is no high school baseball in Canada, but a year ago (11th grade), my school decided to try it," McNab said. "It didn't go over too well. I guess not enough kids play the game. "Oh, yeah. I was interested, and went out for the team.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012 | By Daniel Carp and Daily News Staff Writer
For 27 years, the Carpenter Cup has been more than just an all-star high school baseball tournament. Since the tournament's inception in 1986 at Veterans Stadium, event not only provides top-notch competition, it also gives the athletes a chance to realize a major league dream. This year's semifinals and championship game will be played at Citizens Bank Park, the home of most of these players' big-league idols. Ultimately, this dream would not be realized for the Inter-Ac/Independents, who fell 5-3 to defending champion Lehigh Valley, at Ashburn Field on Friday morning.
SPORTS
June 20, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Columnist
Max Mason, 59, of Wynnewood, has a romantic view of baseball. His love extends far beyond players, and depends little on wins and losses. He is a painter, and sees baseball as a world of lines and planes, color and light, art and architecture. He can rhapsodize about the foul pole. His oil paintings hang in offices all through Citizens Bank Park, with three outdoor murals in Harry the K's restaurant. "One day I was painting during construction," he said. "There was this huge yellow thing that came in. They were putting in the foul pole.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Major-league baseball historians refer to the first 20 years of the 20th century as the "Dead Ball Era. " South Jersey baseball has entered the "Live Arm Era. " Both time periods have stressed the same aspects of the sport: fielding, baserunning, situational hitting and, most of all, the performance of the guys on the pitching mound. "There are just so many good arms out there," Bishop Eustace coach Sam Tropiano said. "I'm not sure I've ever seen this many who are this good. " Combined with last season's rule change that reduced the "trampoline effect" of composite bats - an equipment switch that lessened the power of the rebound of the ball off the bat - the emergence of so many accomplished pitchers has transformed the sport.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Columnist
CALL THIS THE week of flip-flops. First on Chip, and now this: I want the designated hitter in the National League. While doubling the potential trade partners for Ryan Howard seems motivation enough, I want it for the same reasons many of you don't. Uniformity. Collegiate baseball uses a designated hitter. High school baseball uses a designated hitter. Hell, American Legion even uses it. Congratulations to Little League for holding out, but then again, man, those pitchers can hit. More and more, the ones coming into the major leagues cannot.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
CLINTON HICKSON had no idea where the car was headed; nor did he realize the direction the journey would ultimately guide his life. The Martin Luther King High senior was 10 back then, sitting shotgun in his grandfather's car, when they pulled up to the Mount Airy Playground on Germantown and Sedgwick. Linwood Vaughters, Hickson's grandfather, emerged from the car, baseball glove in hand and a simple explanation on his lips. "My granddad just drove me up and was, like,'You have practice today,' Hickson recalled yesterday on the field behind Simons Community Recreation Center.
SPORTS
August 1, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DONALD HOOTEN is in a war against steroids. His son, Taylor, played high school baseball in Plano, Texas. In 2003, he was withdrawing from steroids when he hung himself. He was 17. In 2005, Hooten appeared before congressional hearings that featured the likes of Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. He told his son's story. Congress, he said, listened attentively. And then? "They did nothing," Hooten told the Daily News last night. "We find ourselves 8 years later, and MLB is now No. 1 in youth education on performance-enhancing drugs and we can't get anything out of our federal government.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Major-league baseball historians refer to the first 20 years of the 20th century as the "Dead Ball Era. " South Jersey baseball has entered the "Live Arm Era. " Both time periods have stressed the same aspects of the sport: fielding, baserunning, situational hitting and, most of all, the performance of the guys on the pitching mound. "There are just so many good arms out there," Bishop Eustace coach Sam Tropiano said. "I'm not sure I've ever seen this many who are this good. " Combined with last season's rule change that reduced the "trampoline effect" of composite bats - an equipment switch that lessened the power of the rebound of the ball off the bat - the emergence of so many accomplished pitchers has transformed the sport.
SPORTS
June 20, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Columnist
Max Mason, 59, of Wynnewood, has a romantic view of baseball. His love extends far beyond players, and depends little on wins and losses. He is a painter, and sees baseball as a world of lines and planes, color and light, art and architecture. He can rhapsodize about the foul pole. His oil paintings hang in offices all through Citizens Bank Park, with three outdoor murals in Harry the K's restaurant. "One day I was painting during construction," he said. "There was this huge yellow thing that came in. They were putting in the foul pole.
SPORTS
June 15, 2012 | By Daniel Carp and Daily News Staff Writer
For 27 years, the Carpenter Cup has been more than just an all-star high school baseball tournament. Since the tournament's inception in 1986 at Veterans Stadium, event not only provides top-notch competition, it also gives the athletes a chance to realize a major league dream. This year's semifinals and championship game will be played at Citizens Bank Park, the home of most of these players' big-league idols. Ultimately, this dream would not be realized for the Inter-Ac/Independents, who fell 5-3 to defending champion Lehigh Valley, at Ashburn Field on Friday morning.
SPORTS
April 1, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Tylor Love looks like a shortstop and acts like a shortstop. He's rangy, sure-handed, a quiet leader with his teammates' complete trust. Nick Tierno looks like a second baseman and acts like a second baseman. He's quick, athletic, and a little louder than his buddy on the other side of the bag. Put the two of them together on a baseball field, and Eastern coach Rob Christ hears a symphony inspired by their synchronicity. "It's artistry," Christ said of his double-play combination.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tylor Love looks like a shortstop and acts like a shortstop. He's rangy, sure-handed, a quiet leader with his teammates' complete trust. Nick Tierno looks like a second baseman and acts like a second baseman. He's quick, athletic, a little louder than his buddy on the other side of the bag. Put the two of them together on a baseball field, and Eastern coach Rob Christ hears a symphony inspired by their synchronicity. "It's artistry," Christ said of his double-play combination.
NEWS
March 27, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brenden Delmonte has committed to attend the Naval Academy, but that might not even be his best water story. Delmonte is a star pitcher and outfielder for Cherry Hill West. He is a top student, a member of the National Honor Society, a two-time president of his class. He plans to study engineering. He is interested in Marine Corps aviation, with an eye toward becoming one of those Top Gun-type fighter pilots. But he's no swimmer. "From five years old, I was all baseball," Delmonte said of avoiding the pervasive swim-club scene in Cherry Hill.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than 25 years, batting practice at Bishop Eustace has meant one thing: road hazards on Route 70. Because of the short right field, the parade of power hitters in the program and, most of all, the bats that changed the sport, Crusaders coach Sam Tropiano used to throw practice pitches and cross his fingers. "I always would be thinking, 'Oh, I hope there's a gap in traffic,' " Tropiano said of the dangers to the cars on Route 70 with its eastbound lanes just behind the right-field fence.
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