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High School Diploma

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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the question Toshea Greene had been dreading, but one she knew eventually had to come. Sitting in her supervisor's office after almost a year on the job, a decision she made 27 years ago had returned to dismantle everything. Greene, 42, a divorced mother of two, left school after ninth grade. During a routine audit last year of personnel files at the Center City nonprofit where she did community outreach, her secret was discovered. It would cost her the job, which required a high-school diploma.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When you've been away from school for 67 years, your geometry gets a little rusty. Martha Gerhart's son had to explain isosceles triangles to her on a kitchen blackboard. But when the 81-year-old Gerhart dons a cap and gown Tuesday evening to receive an honorary diploma with the Hatboro-Horsham High School graduating class, it will be a tribute to her own determination in earning a high-school equivalency diploma this year. "You can learn a lot of things if you have the will," said Gerhart, a slim and energetic woman who spends hours quilting for friends and organizations.
NEWS
November 3, 2009 | By DOM GIORDANO
IN AN AGE of increasing fragmentation, I look for areas of common sense that can rally citizens to improve our schools and better educate our kids. I think every parent and taxpayer in Pennsylvania would say that students who graduate from high school should be proficient enough in reading, writing and math to enter the world of work or attend college. The high-school diploma is supposed to be the credential indicating you have those proficiencies. But I know I speak for many when I say the diploma is a compromised document.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Cooper grew up listening to the click of shears, the slap-slap of a straight razor being smoothed on a strop. As the son of a barber, he naturally learned the trade, putting himself through graduate school cutting hair. And in 1971, when the Las Vegas coroner called Cooper to break the news that his father had died of a massive heart attack while attending a convention, the doctor of psychology suddenly found himself running a barber college on the side. "I could've just dropped the whole thing because I was busy with my psychology life," said Cooper of Warrington.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
KEIRA AVILES-RIVERA had decided she was going to get her life back on track by leaving her boyfriend and getting her GED. But just a few days removed from her breakup, neighbors said, the situation turned tragic yesterday when the 19-year-old's deranged ex-boyfriend allegedly shot her in the face and shot her 21-year-old brother in the back about 2 a.m. in a house on Margaret Street near Torresdale Avenue. About an hour later, police shot the ex-boyfriend blocks away after they said he pointed a loaded gun at officers and tried to take a cop's service weapon.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Claiming that students who take GED exams do not cover all the material now required to earn a high school diploma in New Jersey, the state Department of Education has proposed discontinuing state-endorsed high school diplomas for people who take the GED test. Under proposed regulations presented at last week's state Board of Education meeting, New Jerseyans taking the nationally administered General Education Development (GED) test would earn a certificate saying they had passed the GED course, but they would no longer earn a full-fledged diploma.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
There are more than 38,000 adults over the age of 25 in Gloucester County who do not have high school diplomas, said John Karaska, quoting from 1980 federal census statistics. Karaska, evening school principal at Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School, hopes to make a dent in that statistic. The vocational school is about to become the first facility in Gloucester County to offer adult high school classes, leading to a diploma, on the premises. Currently, Karaska said, any adult in the county wishing a high school diploma must apply to Glassboro High School, which will enroll the student in its adult program.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sixteen-year-old Cheri Lynn Holker of Ridley Township was driving to a McDonald's with two friends on the night of Dec. 26 - it was one day before she was to leave for a vacation overseas - when a drunken driver's vehicle plowed into her car, killing her and injuring two of her friends. Yesterday, in an emotionally charged Delaware County courtroom, the driver, John J. Carney of Chester, a 34-year-old accountant, was sentenced to 38 months to 14 years in state prison for the DUI-related vehicular homicide and two counts of simple assault.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the value of a high school education? Recent U.S. Census data says it's worth at least $10,386 - the difference between the average income of high school graduates and the income earned by dropouts. Seeking to help county residents earn high school diplomas - and potentially more money - the Camden County Library System has enlisted in a New Jersey State Library-aided program that offers a second chance to dropouts. The Career Online High School (COHS) program, which has brought a slew of new laptops to the county library system, can accommodate up to 35 county library card holders who are at least 19 years and have completed their freshman year of high school before dropping out. First to enroll in the program was Nancy Torres, 29, of Camden.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | BY SCOTT BOSTWICK
Philadelphia's celebration of International Literacy Day, hosted by the Mayor's Commission on Literacy, revealed a program sure to bring promise and hope to thousands of Philadelphia residents. With the installation of the Philadelphia Adult Diploma Program, the collaborative effort of the Center for Literacy, District 1199C and the School District of Philadelphia, adults lacking a high school diploma will no longer need to search for ways to obtain its equivalent. Currently in place to remedy the need for high school diplomas is the General Equivalency Degree.
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NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the value of a high school education? Recent U.S. Census data says it's worth at least $10,386 - the difference between the average income of high school graduates and the income earned by dropouts. Seeking to help county residents earn high school diplomas - and potentially more money - the Camden County Library System has enlisted in a New Jersey State Library-aided program that offers a second chance to dropouts. The Career Online High School (COHS) program, which has brought a slew of new laptops to the county library system, can accommodate up to 35 county library card holders who are at least 19 years and have completed their freshman year of high school before dropping out. First to enroll in the program was Nancy Torres, 29, of Camden.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a $25 million annual budget, Congreso de Latinos Unidos has a big impact in Hispanic and African American neighborhoods in North Philadelphia. Operating a health clinic and charter school, the nonprofit also offers programs dealing with parenting, housing, truancy avoidance, domestic violence, job preparation, drug abuse, mental health, after-school care, and HIV. Any one of the programs could have been a full conversation, but what Cynthia Figueroa, 40, Congreso's president and CEO, wanted to discuss was data and the importance of measuring whether programs actually made a difference in people's lives.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
WITH THE RISING cost of college, people have been asking if it's worth the investment. But that might be the wrong question. We know that many employers demand a college degree - any degree - as a requirement for someone to be considered for an interview. It's frustrating for laid-off workers without degrees to be ignored or undervalued despite their years of experience and skills. That's the economy we have, with more people than jobs available. Still, if you have to borrow to go to college, the real question is not about the degree but rather the debt.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
PHILADELPHIA has 25 percent fewer jobs than it had in 1970, and while other major Northeastern cities have reversed the job-loss trend, Philly continues "bumping along the bottom," weighed down by poverty, unemployment and education problems, the Center City District's Paul Levy said yesterday. Levy released the results yesterday of the group's two-month study of the city's sagging job growth. Levy and researcher Lauren M. Gilchrist found that Philadelphia fell below comparable cities like New York, Washington, D.C., Boston, Baltimore and Detroit on many measures that contribute to stagnant job growth.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Giancarlo Tello, 23, didn't know he was in the United States illegally until he was a sophomore in high school and his mother told him he couldn't get a driver's license. Other realizations followed: Tello, whose parents brought him to New Jersey from Peru when he was 6, learned he didn't have a Social Security number. He couldn't work, except at odd jobs. And he couldn't receive financial aid to go to college or qualify for in-state tuition. While he earned enough as a tennis coach and computer instructor to attend Bergen Community College - hitching rides from his father, who woke him at 5 a.m. and picked him up from the school at 11 p.m. - Tello couldn't afford to continue a political science major he had begun at Rutgers University, he said Thursday.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
KEIRA AVILES-RIVERA had decided she was going to get her life back on track by leaving her boyfriend and getting her GED. But just a few days removed from her breakup, neighbors said, the situation turned tragic yesterday when the 19-year-old's deranged ex-boyfriend allegedly shot her in the face and shot her 21-year-old brother in the back about 2 a.m. in a house on Margaret Street near Torresdale Avenue. About an hour later, police shot the ex-boyfriend blocks away after they said he pointed a loaded gun at officers and tried to take a cop's service weapon.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN HENRY WELLS arrived in Philly back in 1975, he was on the lam from the feds. Henry was a bad man, as he would freely admit, and had been selling and using drugs in his native Florida like there was no tomorrow. And there might not have been a tomorrow if Henry hadn't experienced what he called a "moment of sanity" after his arrival here. Although he continued to wallow in the drug world in Philly for a time, it gradually dawned on him that there had to be a better way. With the help of a drug-rehab program and the support of a good woman, his wife, Margaret, Henry not only changed his own life, but set about changing others' lives as well.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Between her Easy-Bake Oven days and earning a culinary-arts degree came what Jackie Hill calls the "horrible" years. Now a 55-year-old grandmother, at 28, she was a single mother of five children, living in public housing and cleaning offices to make ends meet. It was a life Hill walked into after her father died, and she felt adrift. Pregnant at 16, she dropped out of high school. But she never resigned herself to a fate of just getting by. "I kept thinking about getting my degree," said Hill, of Norristown.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By Kathleen Owens Now, more than ever before, a college degree is a necessity for those entering the job market. Recent data from the U.S. Department of Labor show the glaring disparity between those who obtain a degree vs. those who do not: The unemployment rate for college graduates is 3.9 percent, compared with 7.5 percent for the workforce as a whole. The number of college-educated workers with jobs has risen by 9.1 percent since the beginning of the recession. For workers with a high school diploma, employment is down 9 percent.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Snell, 18, racked up almost enough college credits for two associate's degrees before earning his high school diploma. Homeschooled by his parents, the Moorestown teen simultaneously took 30-some classes at Burlington County College for more than 100 credits. He has applied to Wharton and a handful of other prestigious schools. While his accomplishments are impressive, they are not unusual in the Snell family. Both of Ryan's older brothers, Jake and Tom, took dozens of classes at the county college while being homeschooled.
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