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High School Diploma

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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the question Toshea Greene had been dreading, but one she knew eventually had to come. Sitting in her supervisor's office after almost a year on the job, a decision she made 27 years ago had returned to dismantle everything. Greene, 42, a divorced mother of two, left school after ninth grade. During a routine audit last year of personnel files at the Center City nonprofit where she did community outreach, her secret was discovered. It would cost her the job, which required a high-school diploma.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By Wendy Greenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When you've been away from school for 67 years, your geometry gets a little rusty. Martha Gerhart's son had to explain isosceles triangles to her on a kitchen blackboard. But when the 81-year-old Gerhart dons a cap and gown Tuesday evening to receive an honorary diploma with the Hatboro-Horsham High School graduating class, it will be a tribute to her own determination in earning a high-school equivalency diploma this year. "You can learn a lot of things if you have the will," said Gerhart, a slim and energetic woman who spends hours quilting for friends and organizations.
NEWS
November 3, 2009 | By DOM GIORDANO
IN AN AGE of increasing fragmentation, I look for areas of common sense that can rally citizens to improve our schools and better educate our kids. I think every parent and taxpayer in Pennsylvania would say that students who graduate from high school should be proficient enough in reading, writing and math to enter the world of work or attend college. The high-school diploma is supposed to be the credential indicating you have those proficiencies. But I know I speak for many when I say the diploma is a compromised document.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Cooper grew up listening to the click of shears, the slap-slap of a straight razor being smoothed on a strop. As the son of a barber, he naturally learned the trade, putting himself through graduate school cutting hair. And in 1971, when the Las Vegas coroner called Cooper to break the news that his father had died of a massive heart attack while attending a convention, the doctor of psychology suddenly found himself running a barber college on the side. "I could've just dropped the whole thing because I was busy with my psychology life," said Cooper of Warrington.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Pennsylvania delegate Jan C. Ting has pledged to support Donald Trump. He was incorrectly listed as uncommitted in a chart in Sunday's Inquirer. In a story Sunday, the Inquirer incorrectly reported the number of residents in Warminster, Bucks County, with a high school diploma or some college. The story should have said that 63 percent of residents have a high school diploma or some college.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
KEIRA AVILES-RIVERA had decided she was going to get her life back on track by leaving her boyfriend and getting her GED. But just a few days removed from her breakup, neighbors said, the situation turned tragic yesterday when the 19-year-old's deranged ex-boyfriend allegedly shot her in the face and shot her 21-year-old brother in the back about 2 a.m. in a house on Margaret Street near Torresdale Avenue. About an hour later, police shot the ex-boyfriend blocks away after they said he pointed a loaded gun at officers and tried to take a cop's service weapon.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Claiming that students who take GED exams do not cover all the material now required to earn a high school diploma in New Jersey, the state Department of Education has proposed discontinuing state-endorsed high school diplomas for people who take the GED test. Under proposed regulations presented at last week's state Board of Education meeting, New Jerseyans taking the nationally administered General Education Development (GED) test would earn a certificate saying they had passed the GED course, but they would no longer earn a full-fledged diploma.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
There are more than 38,000 adults over the age of 25 in Gloucester County who do not have high school diplomas, said John Karaska, quoting from 1980 federal census statistics. Karaska, evening school principal at Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School, hopes to make a dent in that statistic. The vocational school is about to become the first facility in Gloucester County to offer adult high school classes, leading to a diploma, on the premises. Currently, Karaska said, any adult in the county wishing a high school diploma must apply to Glassboro High School, which will enroll the student in its adult program.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sixteen-year-old Cheri Lynn Holker of Ridley Township was driving to a McDonald's with two friends on the night of Dec. 26 - it was one day before she was to leave for a vacation overseas - when a drunken driver's vehicle plowed into her car, killing her and injuring two of her friends. Yesterday, in an emotionally charged Delaware County courtroom, the driver, John J. Carney of Chester, a 34-year-old accountant, was sentenced to 38 months to 14 years in state prison for the DUI-related vehicular homicide and two counts of simple assault.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | BY SCOTT BOSTWICK
Philadelphia's celebration of International Literacy Day, hosted by the Mayor's Commission on Literacy, revealed a program sure to bring promise and hope to thousands of Philadelphia residents. With the installation of the Philadelphia Adult Diploma Program, the collaborative effort of the Center for Literacy, District 1199C and the School District of Philadelphia, adults lacking a high school diploma will no longer need to search for ways to obtain its equivalent. Currently in place to remedy the need for high school diplomas is the General Equivalency Degree.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Frank H. Radey Jr. was 10 or 11, "he used to carry his shotgun to school," in Collingswood, his wife, Patricia, said he told her. After he had plugged a rabbit near Newton Creek now and then, "he would throw it up on his father's sister's front porch. " And after Aunt Hilda had taken it in for a few hours, "he would pick it up on the way home, so his mother could cook it, make a stew for him. " In the early 1940s, his wife said, "he was allowed to take a gun into school," and leave it with an official.
SPORTS
June 10, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
THE REALITY of rebuilding a Major League Baseball organization is that even the most meticulous of front offices needs to run into a considerable amount of good fortune. Take the Cubs, for example. Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer deserve plenty of credit for the turnaround they've orchestrated. Yet for all of the shrewdness they displayed in acquiring Jake Arrieta, Anthony Rizzo and Addison Russell, it was plain dumb luck that they were able to add a hitter such as Kris Bryant to the mix. Some years, there is a Bryant available at No. 2 overall.
NEWS
May 27, 2016
ISSUE | MINIMUM WAGE Working hard for a better living An article about fast-food worker and activist Shymara Jones effectively described her rationale for a $15-an-hour minimum wage and her significant effort to achieve that goal ("A voice for change," Sunday). She has a high school diploma and some college credits, but her labor-organizing activities have demonstrated initiative, leadership, and the potential to succeed in a more lucrative occupation. It appears she would be better off diverting that effort to focus on getting a higher-paying job. She indicated that increased income would make her happy and more independent.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
1 A tree grows near State Road and Linden To kick off this year's Love Your Park Week, Mayor Kenney will help plant trees near the fishing pier in Pleasant Hill Park in Torresdale today. More than 100 volunteers are expected to help clean and mulch at the park, starting at 8:30 a.m. The mayor and other dignitaries speak at 11:30 a.m. 2 Juniata Park Parade returns After a 15-year absence, the Juniata Park Parade is back, beginning at 1 p.m. today. This year's parade features the Samuel Fels High School Band and the Polish American String Band.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Pennsylvania delegate Jan C. Ting has pledged to support Donald Trump. He was incorrectly listed as uncommitted in a chart in Sunday's Inquirer. In a story Sunday, the Inquirer incorrectly reported the number of residents in Warminster, Bucks County, with a high school diploma or some college. The story should have said that 63 percent of residents have a high school diploma or some college.
NEWS
August 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE DAVIS picked himself up out of the gutter of drug addiction and went on to a life devoted to helping others climb out of the same gutter. In his early days, it didn't seem that things could have gotten much worse for Joe. He was a drug addict for 20 years, then was shot in the spine and rendered a paraplegic. Nothing was going right for him. He wasn't even able to kill himself successfully. Actually, it was his attempted suicide in the mid-1980s, when he swallowed 300 pills and put himself in a four-day coma, that turned his life around.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015
I ENVISION my son one day embarking upon the science career he desires. I expect my daughter to attend an Ivy League law school, where she'll use her gifts of deduction and reason to level the scales of justice. I know there are thousands of children with similar visions. Unfortunately, our city's leaders seem to have a different end in mind for the children of Philadelphia. While our public schools are projecting an $85 million deficit with no certain way to fill the gap, City Council is considering Bill 150406, which was sponsored by 6th District Councilman Bobby Henon with the support of the Nutter administration.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angel Rodriguez was stuck, living in the projects in Camden, bouncing among low-paying jobs, struggling to support himself and his disabled mother. He had tried to find jobs that pay above minimum wage - more than the few dollars he earned working at grocery stores or as a cook in a hotel - but his resumé had an obvious gap. "Every job I would go apply to, they would go, 'Do you have a high school diploma?' " said Rodriguez, 22. "I would have tell them no, because I'm not the type of person to lie on my application.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the value of a high school education? Recent U.S. Census data says it's worth at least $10,386 - the difference between the average income of high school graduates and the income earned by dropouts. Seeking to help county residents earn high school diplomas - and potentially more money - the Camden County Library System has enlisted in a New Jersey State Library-aided program that offers a second chance to dropouts. The Career Online High School (COHS) program, which has brought a slew of new laptops to the county library system, can accommodate up to 35 county library card holders who are at least 19 years and have completed their freshman year of high school before dropping out. First to enroll in the program was Nancy Torres, 29, of Camden.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a $25 million annual budget, Congreso de Latinos Unidos has a big impact in Hispanic and African American neighborhoods in North Philadelphia. Operating a health clinic and charter school, the nonprofit also offers programs dealing with parenting, housing, truancy avoidance, domestic violence, job preparation, drug abuse, mental health, after-school care, and HIV. Any one of the programs could have been a full conversation, but what Cynthia Figueroa, 40, Congreso's president and CEO, wanted to discuss was data and the importance of measuring whether programs actually made a difference in people's lives.
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