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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
At 1 p.m. this afternoon the Historic Burlington Preservation Foundation will hold its annual walking tour in Burlington City, with this year's tour to feature the High Street historic district. The theme for the tour will be the people and places of Burlington from 1677 to 1702, with Robert Thompson, the former manager of the High Street restoration program, as tour guide. The tour will start at the Hoskins House at 202 High St. In the latter years of the 17th century, Quakers established the community after purchasing what would become West Jersey from Lord Berkeley for 1,000 pounds.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
James Fenimore Cooper, the early American novelist, was born in 1789 and spent the first 13 months of his life in a home on High Street, Burlington City, that is open to the public. Cooper's parents rented the home before leaving for Otsego Lake in New York, now renamed Cooperstown, according to the Burlington County Historical Society, which owns the Cooper home. A Windsor chair owned by Cooper's father is still in the home, said Margaret Esposito, secretary for the society.
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Buoyed by its successful first year and a half, High Street on Market - the casual sibling of Fork in Old City - plans to open a second location in late summer or early fall in Lower Manhattan. Ellen Yin and chef Eli Kulp have signed a deal at the corner of Hudson and Horatio Streets in the West Village. The concept - ingredient-driven American foods and baked goods served from breakfast through dinner in a cozy cafe setting - will remain. This location is a third larger than the original at 308 Market St.   Que pasa The Garces Group is slinging Mexican food in a Baja beach scene at Buena Onda (1901 Callowhill St., 215-302-3530)
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
LONG HOTS are to peppers what the Liberty Bell is to American history: iconic, necessary and impossible to live without. Long hots deliver just the right amount of heat along with full-on pepper flavor that turns an average sandwich into an eye-popping culinary bomb. A common accessory in homemade Italian comfort cooking, long hots are generally fried, or roasted with olive oil, garlic and salt and served whole, skin and seeds intact. Because they vary so much in spiciness, the sly little devils play peek-a-boo with the Scoville scale, the accepted way to chart the heat of chili peppers.
FOOD
August 26, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
Every Monday at noon on the dot, the intoxicating cooking smells wafting out of the kitchen of American Sardine Bar are met with a little olfactory competition: burning incense. A few feet from the fryer and flattop grill, a small group of practitioners do their part to convert the top floor of the Point Breeze beer bar into a temporary yoga studio, bending and stretching on the hardwood floor per the directions of instructor Maria Cuscavage. Though it charges no admission, it's an exclusive club - open only to the employees of ASB and its sister bar, the South Philadelphia Tap Room, where Cuscavage has worked for the last seven years.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pop quiz: What do the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island and High Street in Burlington City have in common? All are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 200, 300 and 400 blocks of High Street were placed on the listing in December, but official notification is only now being sent out, said officials at the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office. High Street is the city's second listing on the national register, after the 1975 listing of the historic district between Delaware and Wood Streets, which includes most of the city's oldest homes.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The borough's efforts to spruce up downtown have moved into higher gear with a federally funded project to beautify High Street and clean up an old industrial complex along Delsea Drive. The four-phase Streetscape project, which began last week, will replace the old concrete sidewalks with new brick pavers and add street lamps, trees and trash cans. The first two phases, funded with a $220,000 federal transportation grant obtained with the help of former U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, will improve High Street from Center to Poplar Streets.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Amy Westfeldt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They might not bring in hundreds of people, but at least they're giving customers something to stare at besides an empty window. Business owners in Burlington City's celebrated High Street district cautiously welcomed the addition of two stores last month - a T-shirt and sportswear store and a flower shop - to fill gaping holes on the two-block historic strip of stores, offices and restaurants. "It's better to have them filled up," said Betty Jacob, owner of Petite Innovations, a doll-house shop.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After being at loggerheads for nearly a year, city officials and representatives of a planned halfway house for alcoholics on High Street have buried the hatchet. In an agreement reached March 2, the city agreed to drop legal objections to Amity House, and the home withdrew a damage claim against the city. The City Council voted, 3-2, the same day to approve the settlement. Amity House's board of trustees is expected to approve the agreement Tuesday evening. "I did not believe that it was worth the risk of monetary damages," City Solicitor David Serlin said, noting that courts had recently ruled in favor of group homes in similar cases in Audubon and Cherry Hill.
FOOD
June 20, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long a forgettable freebie to take the edge off before the real food arrived, bread is getting fresh-baked respect on local tables. At fine-dining restaurants such as Fork and Avance, bread has been elevated to a "course" - complete with tasting notes - within elaborate prix fixe menus. And more restaurants are recognizing bread's value and charging for it: Petruce et al. puts a price on its hearth-baked sourdough, as does Pub and Kitchen for its whiskey-sage bread with ramp butter.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 26, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
Every Monday at noon on the dot, the intoxicating cooking smells wafting out of the kitchen of American Sardine Bar are met with a little olfactory competition: burning incense. A few feet from the fryer and flattop grill, a small group of practitioners do their part to convert the top floor of the Point Breeze beer bar into a temporary yoga studio, bending and stretching on the hardwood floor per the directions of instructor Maria Cuscavage. Though it charges no admission, it's an exclusive club - open only to the employees of ASB and its sister bar, the South Philadelphia Tap Room, where Cuscavage has worked for the last seven years.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Daniel Block, Staff Writer
Run-down buildings line the borough's pockmarked downtown streets, bordering sidewalks cracked by weeds. Montgomery County is one of the wealthiest in the state, but Pottstown, one of its biggest municipalities, looks more like the town that prosperity forgot. Thus the opening of a newly constructed bank branch on High Street constitutes a major event for a town with high aspirations for revival. "You don't see a lot of brick-and-mortar bank branches being opened these days," said Steve Bamford, executive director of Pottstown Area Industrial Development.
FOOD
July 1, 2016 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
A restaurant may not be able to be all things to all eaters, but there is a new breed of eateries in the city that are giving it a go - offering meals morning, noon, and night. Unlike the traditional diner, these breakfast-lunch-and-dinner restaurants of the moment not only offer more ambitious cooking, but they often visually transform over the course of a day. Hungry Pigeon, a charming storefront in South Philadelphia, starts out as an airy cafe serving morning coffee and biscuits with sausage gravy, then moves to salad and wine lunches.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Joseph R. Polito Jr., 77, of West Chester, a lawyer and civic volunteer so devoted to his home turf that friends called him "Mr. Chester County," died Sunday, June 19, of cancer at Neighborhood Hospice, West Chester. He had been diagnosed in 2011, his family said. Born on Valentine's Day, Mr. Polito was the first son of Giuseppe Rosario Polito, of Monforte San Giorgio, Sicily, and Rose Concetta Terrizzi, of West Chester. He grew up playing in the aisles of his family's corner grocery in West Chester.
FOOD
June 10, 2016
Here is a selection of farmers' markets across the region. For more information, check the two organizations that manage most markets, Farm to City ( www.farmtocity.org ) and the Food Trust ( www.thefoodtrust.org ). Philadelphia Italian Market: S. 9th St. & Washington Ave.; Tue.-Sat. 8 am-4 pm; Sun. to 1 pm. www.italianmarketphilly.org . Reading Terminal Market : 51 N. 12th St.; Mon.-Sat. 8 am-6 pm; Sun. 9 am-5 pm. www.readingterminalmarket.org . Greensgrow Farm Stand : 2501 E. Cumberland St.; Thu. 3-7 pm; Sat. 10 am-2 pm. www.greensgrow.org . Greensgrow West : 4912 Baltimore Ave.; Mon.-Tue.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
Homesick Philadelphians need not go hungry in the Big Apple. Yes, I'm well aware Manhattan has a few nice places of its own. But, sometimes, a person just needs a little taste of the "215" to keep it real. And NYC has options. Some Really Big Philly Names, in fact, are just about to make more noise in the city, with hummus master Michael Solomonov and another Stephen Starr production set for May openings, plus a new Amada that Jose Garces opened last week. It's too early to know how those projects will fare.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, RESTAURANT CRITIC
NEW YORK - Just a few years ago, Philadelphia came into its own as a magnet for ambitious young chefs from around the country who sought their culinary fortunes in a city rich with restaurant opportunity. But the story line has now reversed, as Philadelphia's restaurant stars have begun exporting their brands, especially, at the moment, to Manhattan. These days, New Yorkers can find spicy dandan heaven at a Han Dynasty in the East Village. Or a Hickory Town breakfast sandwich at the new High Street on Hudson in the West Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
For some, the best part of the Broad Street Run (starting 8 a.m. Sunday) is not finishing the epic 10-miler that takes its runners throughout Philadelphia. It's the carbo-loading before the race. Katie Cavuto, M.S., R.D., culinary nutritionist, and dietitian for the Philadelphia Phillies, and Philly.com contributor, suggests having a large meal at lunch and going simple for dinner. Stay away from the booze. Keep that in mind Saturday when perusing these five places to nosh on pastas and breads the day before the big race.
FOOD
March 17, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of March 15, 2016: Craig LaBan: James Beard finalists were announced this week, and Philadelphians are well-represented. Michael Solomonov was named a best chef finalist as one of the top five chefs in the country. Solomonov's book Zahav , co-authored with partner Steven Cook, is also a finalist in the international cookbook category. On the climb, three of the six finalists for best chef in the Mid-Atlantic - Greg Vernick, Rich Landau, and Eli Kulp - were finalists in their home region category.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A fire that ripped through a 19th-century row of houses in Burlington City last week has sparked an outpouring of assistance for 20 displaced residents. "This is just such a supportive community. We pulled 15 people together to help in a matter of hours," says Denise Hollingsworth, president of the Historic Yorkshire Alliance, a nonprofit coordinating grassroots efforts. "Doesn't surprise me at all," says City Administrator David H. Ballard, who is Burlington born and raised. "I love this town, and that feeling is shared.
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