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NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
At 1 p.m. this afternoon the Historic Burlington Preservation Foundation will hold its annual walking tour in Burlington City, with this year's tour to feature the High Street historic district. The theme for the tour will be the people and places of Burlington from 1677 to 1702, with Robert Thompson, the former manager of the High Street restoration program, as tour guide. The tour will start at the Hoskins House at 202 High St. In the latter years of the 17th century, Quakers established the community after purchasing what would become West Jersey from Lord Berkeley for 1,000 pounds.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Dawn Capewell, Special to The Inquirer
James Fenimore Cooper, the early American novelist, was born in 1789 and spent the first 13 months of his life in a home on High Street, Burlington City, that is open to the public. Cooper's parents rented the home before leaving for Otsego Lake in New York, now renamed Cooperstown, according to the Burlington County Historical Society, which owns the Cooper home. A Windsor chair owned by Cooper's father is still in the home, said Margaret Esposito, secretary for the society.
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Buoyed by its successful first year and a half, High Street on Market - the casual sibling of Fork in Old City - plans to open a second location in late summer or early fall in Lower Manhattan. Ellen Yin and chef Eli Kulp have signed a deal at the corner of Hudson and Horatio Streets in the West Village. The concept - ingredient-driven American foods and baked goods served from breakfast through dinner in a cozy cafe setting - will remain. This location is a third larger than the original at 308 Market St.   Que pasa The Garces Group is slinging Mexican food in a Baja beach scene at Buena Onda (1901 Callowhill St., 215-302-3530)
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pop quiz: What do the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island and High Street in Burlington City have in common? All are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 200, 300 and 400 blocks of High Street were placed on the listing in December, but official notification is only now being sent out, said officials at the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office. High Street is the city's second listing on the national register, after the 1975 listing of the historic district between Delaware and Wood Streets, which includes most of the city's oldest homes.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The borough's efforts to spruce up downtown have moved into higher gear with a federally funded project to beautify High Street and clean up an old industrial complex along Delsea Drive. The four-phase Streetscape project, which began last week, will replace the old concrete sidewalks with new brick pavers and add street lamps, trees and trash cans. The first two phases, funded with a $220,000 federal transportation grant obtained with the help of former U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, will improve High Street from Center to Poplar Streets.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Amy Westfeldt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They might not bring in hundreds of people, but at least they're giving customers something to stare at besides an empty window. Business owners in Burlington City's celebrated High Street district cautiously welcomed the addition of two stores last month - a T-shirt and sportswear store and a flower shop - to fill gaping holes on the two-block historic strip of stores, offices and restaurants. "It's better to have them filled up," said Betty Jacob, owner of Petite Innovations, a doll-house shop.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Louis Hau, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After being at loggerheads for nearly a year, city officials and representatives of a planned halfway house for alcoholics on High Street have buried the hatchet. In an agreement reached March 2, the city agreed to drop legal objections to Amity House, and the home withdrew a damage claim against the city. The City Council voted, 3-2, the same day to approve the settlement. Amity House's board of trustees is expected to approve the agreement Tuesday evening. "I did not believe that it was worth the risk of monetary damages," City Solicitor David Serlin said, noting that courts had recently ruled in favor of group homes in similar cases in Audubon and Cherry Hill.
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything in Laurel restaurant is chosen with precise care by chef and owner Nick Elmi. The wall sconces, of mottled brown iron and imperfect glass, were made by sous chef Eddie Konrad. Elmi built each piece of the rustic furniture and painted all the walls a creamy almond. One of the servers provides the fresh flowers that adorn each table. While the porcelain dinner plates weren't made by the staff, they were made especially for the Passyunk Avenue restaurant to Elmi's exacting specifications by a local ceramics studio, Felt+Fat . There's something about knowing the wares were made "just for us," Elmi said, turning a plate over and running his fingers across the Laurel engraved in the porcelain.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
LONG HOTS are to peppers what the Liberty Bell is to American history: iconic, necessary and impossible to live without. Long hots deliver just the right amount of heat along with full-on pepper flavor that turns an average sandwich into an eye-popping culinary bomb. A common accessory in homemade Italian comfort cooking, long hots are generally fried, or roasted with olive oil, garlic and salt and served whole, skin and seeds intact. Because they vary so much in spiciness, the sly little devils play peek-a-boo with the Scoville scale, the accepted way to chart the heat of chili peppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013
  The Yorkshire Alliance Home and Garden Tour takes place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Rain date is May 19. Tickets can be purchased at the Antiques Emporium, 424 High Street, 609-747-8333, and at Phillip's Furniture, 307 High Street, 609-386-7125. Price: $20 per person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 17, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everything in Laurel restaurant is chosen with precise care by chef and owner Nick Elmi. The wall sconces, of mottled brown iron and imperfect glass, were made by sous chef Eddie Konrad. Elmi built each piece of the rustic furniture and painted all the walls a creamy almond. One of the servers provides the fresh flowers that adorn each table. While the porcelain dinner plates weren't made by the staff, they were made especially for the Passyunk Avenue restaurant to Elmi's exacting specifications by a local ceramics studio, Felt+Fat . There's something about knowing the wares were made "just for us," Elmi said, turning a plate over and running his fingers across the Laurel engraved in the porcelain.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | Inquirer Staff
                        Philly's Riley bails from 'The Voice' Philly's reality-TV light was snuffed a bit on Monday night. Famed street singer Anthony Riley , who could be heard belting old soul tunes in Rittenhouse Square, among other environs, has left NBC's The Voice , according to team captain Pharrell . The be-hatted one announced that Riley was leaving the show for personal reasons? During auditions, Riley's golden pipes made all four judges - Christina Aguilera , Blake Shelton and Adam Levine , in addition to the aforementioned "Happy" man - turn their chairs in record time.
FOOD
March 20, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Buoyed by its successful first year and a half, High Street on Market - the casual sibling of Fork in Old City - plans to open a second location in late summer or early fall in Lower Manhattan. Ellen Yin and chef Eli Kulp have signed a deal at the corner of Hudson and Horatio Streets in the West Village. The concept - ingredient-driven American foods and baked goods served from breakfast through dinner in a cozy cafe setting - will remain. This location is a third larger than the original at 308 Market St.   Que pasa The Garces Group is slinging Mexican food in a Baja beach scene at Buena Onda (1901 Callowhill St., 215-302-3530)
SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
MOBILE, Ala. - If the Eagles were to draft Ohio State wide receiver Devin Smith, known for his capabilities as a vertical threat, they might evoke some comparisons to DeSean Jackson. But Smith said yesterday he's more interested in emulating Jackson's successor as the Birds' top receiver. "I watched Jeremy Maclin a lot, especially when he was at Missouri," Smith said after yesterday's North team Senior Bowl practice at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. "He's a very smooth, smooth runner - just sassy when he runs.
FOOD
January 9, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
You have to be one hungry caterpillar to be a restaurant critic. By conservative calculations, I ate 300 meals out last year for Sunday reviews, Good Taste features, Crumb Tracker clue-hunting missions and other stories. That means I tasted somewhere around 2,200 different dishes over the last 365 days, so imagine trying to whittle all those great (and some not-so-great) food memories down to the 15 best bites. Yeah, I know . . . tough work. But it's really hard! It was such a great chapter for Philly restaurants (food carts, cafés, bakeries and cheese shops)
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Abraham Weitzenkorn opened his family clothing store in Pottstown, Abraham Lincoln was president, and stovepipe hats were the new black. Weitzenkorn, a German immigrant who had peddled his wares from a covered wagon, had saved enough to open a clothing shop, marketing his brand of overalls and work boots to farmers in the area. Over a century later, Weitzenkorn's family still owns a men's clothing store on a main street of the Montgomery County borough. Weitzenkorn's, now offering everything from black tie to beachwear, is celebrating its 150th anniversary, still standing after a shifting retail landscape and a decline of Pottstown's manufacturing base squashed other small businesses.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
LONG HOTS are to peppers what the Liberty Bell is to American history: iconic, necessary and impossible to live without. Long hots deliver just the right amount of heat along with full-on pepper flavor that turns an average sandwich into an eye-popping culinary bomb. A common accessory in homemade Italian comfort cooking, long hots are generally fried, or roasted with olive oil, garlic and salt and served whole, skin and seeds intact. Because they vary so much in spiciness, the sly little devils play peek-a-boo with the Scoville scale, the accepted way to chart the heat of chili peppers.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
A year ago, Alex Bois, 26 at the time, was launching his bread program at the new High Street on Market, the kid sister of Fork, baking the squid-ink bialys and moist kaiser rolls and rustic, local-buckwheat-cherry breads that found a cult following. But since this month's Bon Appetit rated High Street its No. 2 new restaurant in the country, citing Bois' phenomenal breads, he can hardly keep a levain on the shelf. Q: A friend of mine said he heard you were such a purist that you wouldn't eat someone else's bread unless you knew the yeast structure.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man died at Cooper University Hospital on Tuesday, three days after he was struck by a van in East Camden, authorities announced Wednesday. Alfredo Siguenza-Trejo, 39, had been in critical condition since the accident on Saturday, around 9:20 p.m. on 27th Street near High Street. Police said Siguenza-Trejo was entering his parked car when a vehicle hit him. The vehicle - thought to be a white van - then fled down 27th toward River Avenue. On Wednesday, a 54-second video, uploaded to YouTube by the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, revealed some details from the incident.
FOOD
June 20, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long a forgettable freebie to take the edge off before the real food arrived, bread is getting fresh-baked respect on local tables. At fine-dining restaurants such as Fork and Avance, bread has been elevated to a "course" - complete with tasting notes - within elaborate prix fixe menus. And more restaurants are recognizing bread's value and charging for it: Petruce et al. puts a price on its hearth-baked sourdough, as does Pub and Kitchen for its whiskey-sage bread with ramp butter.
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