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High Tide

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NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Engineers tried to determine yesterday what caused the bulkhead in front of two houses on Ludlam Bay in Sea Isle City to collapse over the weekend, rendering three structures uninhabitable. The disintegration of the bulkhead - wood-and-steel walls built to prevent erosion - occurred during an unusually high tide in a deep section of the bay near the mouth of Townsend's Inlet. The water pulled docks, fence and building materials, including a first-floor deck, from two bayside dwellings on Sounds Avenue near 82d Street.
SPORTS
January 2, 1993 | by Dick Weiss, Daily News Sports Writer
The Tide rolled into the Louisiana Superdome. And the University of Miami was swallowed up by the undertow. Alabama's Crimson Tide found a way to turn down the volume on the boisterous, trash-talking Hurricanes in the Sugar Bowl last night, silencing them, 34-13, before a sellout crowd of 76,789. The victory was the Alabama's 13th in an undefeated season and assured the Crimson Tide of their first national championship since 1978-79 season under Paul "Bear" Bryant. It also snapped No. 1 Miami's 29-game winning streak.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's something about the beach, the waves, the terns and gulls that brings out the romantic in people. Good poets and bad poets have wandered along such shores, musing about love and life as the mist sprays their souls and the wind flaps their J. Crew anoraks. So it's little wonder that Theresa Osborne (Robin Wright Penn), a news researcher with the Chicago Tribune who's just gone through a lousy divorce, takes to the sands of Cape Cod after depositing her son with her ex and his new wife.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not for nothing do people call high tide at the Jersey Shore the "meet your neighbor" tide. And so don't mind if Cathy Lusby, 55, of West Berlin, N.J., gets a whiff of the sunblock used by the guy sitting next to her on the tide-shrunken 40th Street beach and has something to say about it. "It smells like a tropical fruit," she informed the heretofore stranger. "It makes you want to eat. " The guy, Stephen Mitzel, 18, of Bristol, took it well, displayed his sunblock for the ladies, and kept his arm still while Lusby's friend Randee Italiano, 54, strained to read the writing under his tattoo.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lucky. The word crops up over and over again when coastal towns assess the effect of Saturday's fierce storm. With the Shore barely dug out from the ravages of the December storm, the coast braced for the worst. But the worst never came. Erosion and beach loss from the storm was minimal, erosion experts and municipal authorities said, with much of the damage restricted to sand dunes. "We skated through with this one," said Stewart Farrell, a coastal geologist at Stockton State College, in Pomona.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Heather had a bad night. Things had gone wrong for the 56-foot commercial fishing vessel even before it ran aground in Atlantic City in the wee hours Monday. Based on preliminary reports, here is what police and emergency responders said happened after the boat left port in Atlantic City: First, a crew member had to get back to shore because of a medical emergency in his family late Sunday. Then, with the boat on autopilot, the captain reportedly fell asleep. That's when the boat ran aground on a popular beach near Missouri Avenue, about 200 yards from the Pier at Caesars.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hurricane Isabel yesterday spiraled toward the fragile Outer Banks of North Carolina and some of the nation's most rapidly developing coastal communities, triggering mass evacuations and threatening millions of inland residents with flooding and high winds. "They're going to get the full force of that hurricane," Max Mayfield, the director of the National Hurricane Center here, said of Outer Banks residents. Last night, the center was predicting a storm surge of 7 to 11 feet when Isabel makes landfall today, probably around lunchtime.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | By Pam Belluck, William H. Sokolic and Jacqueline L. Urgo, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Lisa Suhay and staff writers Daniel LeDuc and Anthony R. Wood contributed to this article. It also contains information from the Associated Press
A fierce storm turned streets into rivers and ripped houses apart along the Jersey Shore on Friday, leaving what some were calling the worst damage since a northeaster ravaged the coast 30 years ago. Hundreds of people were evacuated, at least temporarily, by police boats and National Guard trucks. Ninety-mile-an-hour winds that exceeded hurricane force tore off roofs, downed power lines and snapped trees and street lights like toothpicks. Bridges and sections of highways were closed, flooded by two to four inches of rain.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | For The Inquirer / DAVID M. WARREN
A tow truck pushes through knee-deep water on Rio Grande Avenue in Wildwood. Flooding continued yesterday on the Shore as tides stayed high, boosted by a new moon and a storm about 500 miles offshore. In Ocean City, officials said low-lying spots received two more feet of water during yesterday morning's high tide. More flooding is expected today from a storm front approaching from the Carolinas.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Along the barrier islands, the storm seemed like deja vu, at least until it changed over to all snow around 4:30 and cast an odd wintry glaze over the chopped up dunes, piled up sand, blocks of ruined belongings and broken up dune fencing. Around high tide, there was flooding in the usual places, including Chelsea Heights, Brigantine's North End, and portions of Ventnor Heights. Water rose up around couches and mattresses still waiting for pickup, even as Ventnor and Atlantic City brought in large vehicles to collect the discarded belongings ruined in Sandy's flooding.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The boardwalk looked like a ghost town Tuesday, but except for some high surf, minor street flooding, scattered power outages, and wind gusts that topped out at 55 m.p.h., it appeared like any other chilly, gray December day in this Jersey Shore resort. But barricades had been placed along some low-lying streets, emergency management personnel kept a close watch on the beachfront, and local schools here and in other Shore towns were closed for the day because of "heavy rains, high winds, and tidal flooding.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jessica Heather had a bad night. Things had gone wrong for the 56-foot commercial fishing vessel even before it ran aground in Atlantic City in the wee hours Monday. Based on preliminary reports, here is what police and emergency responders said happened after the boat left port in Atlantic City: First, a crew member had to get back to shore because of a medical emergency in his family late Sunday. Then, with the boat on autopilot, the captain reportedly fell asleep. That's when the boat ran aground on a popular beach near Missouri Avenue, about 200 yards from the Pier at Caesars.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With 60 percent of the Delaware River navigation channel now at or deeper than 45 feet, steamship lines and port officials say the dredging will do two things: Put more cargo on ships currently coming into the ports of Wilmington, Philadelphia, and South Jersey, and allow larger ships from Asia to sail the river when the Panama Canal expansion is completed in 2015. It's been 30 years since Congress directed the Army Corps of Engineers to investigate the feasibility of deepening the channel from 40 feet to 45. Since the project began in March 2010, 42 miles of the 102-mile channel from Camden to the Atlantic Ocean have been deepened.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Lathrop zeros in on North Wildwood to show off a new tool that predicts where the water will go as sea level rises. Looking at high tide, sections of marsh now flood. With a foot of sea-level rise, water laps at a few streets. Two feet, and some neighborhoods flood. Three feet, and portions of the evacuation route are awash - all at high water. No wonder he calls the future view of New Jersey, as envisioned by Rutgers University's new sea-level mapping tool, "disturbing.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
High winds, rain, even thunder and lightning lashed New Jersey's coastal counties Wednesday afternoon as a powerful nor'easter pounded a region still recovering from Hurricane Sandy. A high-wind warning, meaning gusts in excess of 60 m.p.h., had been issued by the National Weather Service, and forecasters were proved correct, as power lines were downed from Monmouth County south through Cape May County, leaving about 50,000 homes and businesses without electricity in the four coastal counties, utility officials said.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | Associated Press
PACIFICA, Calif. - Crews removed an 82-foot yacht from a Northern California beach early Tuesday after authorities say three people stole it, stocked it with pizza and beer, then drove it a little more than 20 miles before running it aground. The luxury vessel "Darling" was pulled from the sand at Pacifica State Beach, where it was stuck for nearly a day. Pacifica police arrested Leslie Gardner, 63, Dario Mira, 54, and Lisa Modawell, 56, on suspicion of grand theft and conspiracy.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - At the north end of town, a 309-foot dredge operated by Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. of Oak Brook, Ill., has been operating 24 hours a day for several days, in a project that will pump 1.8 million cubic yards of sand from the ocean floor onto the beaches. There's no such whoosh of beach-rebuilding at the south end, leaving homeowners there puzzled and upset, especially since Sandy left their shoreline in even worse shape. City officials said that the north-end project was in the works even before the storm struck and that they are unsure what federal aid might be forthcoming to do more right away.
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A wayward dolphin that meandered into a polluted urban canal, riveting onlookers as it splashed around in the filthy water and shook black gunk from its snout, died Friday evening, marine experts said. The deep-freeze weather hadn't seemed to faze the dolphin as it swam in the Gowanus Canal, which runs 1.5 miles through a narrow industrial zone near some of Brooklyn's wealthiest neighborhoods. Marine experts had hoped that high tide, beginning around 7:10 p.m., would help the dolphin leave the canal safely.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
No one at the Coast Guard Air Station in Atlantic City had any doubt the night of Oct. 29 that Sandy would be as close to a perfect storm as they were likely to see. Mayday calls came in early and heavy, and at first light the next day, Lt. Andrew Zuckerman piloted his MH-65 Delta helicopter, with Lt. Skylar Swenson in the copilot seat, out of Brigantine and rotored north toward New York City. "It was eerie," said Swenson, 34. "Big waves coming in, high tide, destruction, and chaos.
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