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High Water

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April 11, 1993 | By Stephen J. Morgan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Everywhere you looked last weekend - from the creeks of suburban Philadelphia north to the Lehigh River and beyond, then west across the mighty Susquehanna and north again to scenic Pine Creek and its superb freestone tributaries, a 440-mile journey - Pennsylvania's trout streams were roily. The high water, the result of steady rains that fell atop a melting snowpack, was thick, brown and uninviting. Water formed pools on croplands and on rural back yards and lawns. At one farm, geese glided across a soggy cornfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Scott McCaughey is feeling sinister. Taking to an outdoor stage on a sunny afternoon at the South by Southwest Music Festival, the leader of the Minus 5 is dressed in black, from cowboy hat down. The frizzy-haired, 51-year-old rocker smiles from behind dark shades and a devilish Van Dyke. The words emblazoned on his guitar strap - Doctor of Evil - suggest he's up to no good. McCaughey (pronounced McCoy) will bring the Minus 5, including R.E.M.'s Peter Buck on bass, to World Cafe Live in Philadelphia on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 22, 2016
There's an official letter on the desk of the character Jeff Bridges plays in Hell or High Water . His name is Marcus Hamilton, he's a Texas Ranger, he's looking at a mandatory-retirement notice. A storied career - chasing down thieves and killers, fugitives and scam artists - and now he's counting down his last days. "He's reaching the end of the line," Bridges says. "And I think that's something that a lot of folks can relate to - giving up what they've done all their lives.
NEWS
May 27, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rescue workers under orders not to enter the turbulent Perkiomen Creek in Montgomery County searched its tree-lined banks yesterday, looking for a Collegeville man and his son presumed to have died while canoeing Wednesday on the waterway. Volunteer fire companies, the Norristown Dive Rescue Unit and the state Fish and Boat Commission scoured the banks near Goodrich Dam in the Oaks section of Upper Providence Township, looking for the bodies of Frederick J. House, 42, and his son Paul, 14. Searchers have said that the two are likely to be found near the lowhead cement dam, located behind the 422 Office Park.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | By Dan Meyers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press and Reuters
First, the enemy was simply the rain. Now there is a new villain: time. Each passing day of the phenomenally long-lived flood in the Midwest gives the water more chances to push and poke, seeking any advantage, relentlessly burrowing under or through the obstacles it cannot surmount. "Time is a real problem," Gary Dyhouse, chief of the hydraulic section for the Army Corps of Engineers' regional office, said yesterday. "When you have high river stages, the river finds weak spots.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | By David Hafetz and Douglas A. Campbell, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Rancocas Creek's swift floodwaters continued to race under the Route 206 bridge in the Ewansville section here yesterday, and currents swirled around the foundations of several dozen homes. Still, the worst had passed, according to the National Weather Service. "Things are getting better," meteorologist Jim Eberwein said in Mount Holly. The Rancocas had fallen to 3.46 feet yesterday afternoon from its high-water mark of 3.6 feet at noon Monday, Eberwein said. Flood stage is a depth of 2.7 feet, measured at a location in Pemberton, a few miles upstream.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Lathrop zeros in on North Wildwood to show off a new tool that predicts where the water will go as sea level rises. Looking at high tide, sections of marsh now flood. With a foot of sea-level rise, water laps at a few streets. Two feet, and some neighborhoods flood. Three feet, and portions of the evacuation route are awash - all at high water. No wonder he calls the future view of New Jersey, as envisioned by Rutgers University's new sea-level mapping tool, "disturbing.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Memories of the record high water of two years ago washed over volunteers yesterday as they sweated on sandbag lines near the point where the flooding Missouri and Mississippi Rivers collide. "We were here in '93 and we're here again in '95 to fight the rivers. Same battle, different year, but we'll do what it takes," sandbagger Bob Thomas said under bright sunshine, with temperatures in the 80s. People in West Alton, Mo., a village bracketed by the two rivers at their confluence, reportedly celebrated at news that the Missouri had crested a half-foot lower than expected, and almost four feet below the 1993 high-water mark.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge opened Aug. 14, 1929, it was supposed to open with a bang. But an afternoon downpour that day dampened the fireworks intended to highlight the ribbon-cutting. So it opened instead with a whistle, provided by the steam siren on the city launch John Wanamaker, which brought Mayor Harry A. Mackey upriver for the ceremony. The bridge put the Tacony-Palmyra Ferry out of business. The ferry was placed into service in 1922, operating between the points where the bridge's shore supports now stand.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Kevin Mcgill, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - All along the swollen Mississippi River, hundreds of thousands of lives depend on a small army of engineers, deputies, and even prison inmates keeping round-the-clock watch at the many floodwalls and earthen levees holding the water back. They are looking for any droplets that seep through the barriers and any cracks that threaten to turn small leaks into big problems. The work is hot and sometimes tedious, but without it, the flooding that has caused weeks of misery from Illinois to the Mississippi Delta could get much worse.
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NEWS
August 22, 2016
There's an official letter on the desk of the character Jeff Bridges plays in Hell or High Water . His name is Marcus Hamilton, he's a Texas Ranger, he's looking at a mandatory-retirement notice. A storied career - chasing down thieves and killers, fugitives and scam artists - and now he's counting down his last days. "He's reaching the end of the line," Bridges says. "And I think that's something that a lot of folks can relate to - giving up what they've done all their lives.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For the last three months, Donald Trump has sailed above the rest of the Republican presidential field like a Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade balloon fueled by bluster and insults instead of helium. Last week's debate, though, could mark the leveling off of Trump's rise and the beginning of his deflation. Candidates stood up to the developer and reality-TV star, landing blows instead of treading lightly as most did in the first debate in August, hoping political gravity would bring him down.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In late April, business partners Tommy Up and Sarah Brown put out an offer: Pitch in to help them open a tiki bar called the Yachtsman in Fishtown, and reap rewards ranging from a private party to your name engraved on a bar stool (plus the right to evict other patrons from said stool). Brown and Up - who is also the owner of PYT, a Northern Liberties eatery that is in the process of franchising its format of wacky burgers and boozy milkshakes - said construction overruns had cleaned them out. So, rather than seek a loan or bring in a partner, they decided to cash in their social capital via Kickstarter, an online crowdfunding platform through which anyone can donate, and funds are collected only if the target goal is reached.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
By the time commuters were getting ready to venture home Wednesday, a colossal traffic jam already was developing - in the atmosphere. A cluster of showers moved into the Philadelphia region at midafternoon, and then, "it just kind of stopped," said Valerie Meola at the National Weather Service in Mount Holly. The result was the region's wettest spring day in 142 years of record-keeping, widespread major flooding along suddenly chocolate-brown waterways, a rash of water rescues, streets more suitable for kayaks than cars, and prodigious cleanup chores likely to lap into the first weekend of May. More than a half-foot of rain - or two months' worth - fell on some areas, and flood warnings remained posted for the Schuylkill from Philadelphia to the Norristown area, the site of major flooding, into Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
By the time commuters were getting ready to venture home Wednesday, a colossal traffic jam already was developing - in the atmosphere. A cluster of showers moved into the Philadelphia region at midafternoon, and then, "it just kind of stopped," said Valerie Meola at the National Weather Service in Mount Holly. The result was the region's wettest spring day in 142 years of record-keeping, widespread major flooding along suddenly chocolate-brown waterways, a rash of water rescues, streets more suitable for kayaks than cars, and prodigious cleanup chores likely to lap into the first weekend of May. More than a half-foot of rain - or two months' worth - fell on some areas, and flood warnings remained posted for the Schuylkill from Philadelphia to the Norristown area, the site of major flooding, into Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities continued the search Sunday for a Washington-area man who disappeared during a tubing expedition on the Delaware River. Anthony Del Prete, 30, was near the end of a four-hour floating excursion Saturday afternoon when he slipped out of his inner tube near Point Pleasant, Bucks County. Rescue boats and divers were dispatched immediately to find Del Prete, who was presumed drowned. Recovery conditions were hindered by high water and low visibility, Point Pleasant Fire Chief Scott Fleischer said.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Matthias Schrader, Associated Press
PASSAU, Germany - Swollen rivers gushed into the old section of Passau in southeast Germany on Monday, as water rose in the city to levels not seen in more than five centuries. The city was one of the worst hit by flooding that has spread across a large area of central Europe following heavy rainfall in recent days. At least eight people were reported to have died and nine were missing due to floods in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the Czech Republic. "The situation is extremely dramatic," Herbert Zillinger, a spokesman for Passau's crisis center, told the Associated Press.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BERNICE APPEL, of Northeast Philadelphia, was already well into her 70s when she told her two grown daughters, "Come hell or high water, I'm going to get my college degree before I'm 80. " Today, less than six months shy of her 80th birthday - "Oct. 30, mischief night!" she said, laughing - the graduating granny dons cap and gown, and proudly gets her associate degree in general studies from Community College of Philadelphia. As Sir Paul McCartney would put it, if he were the commencement singer, it's been a long and winding road.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Lathrop zeros in on North Wildwood to show off a new tool that predicts where the water will go as sea level rises. Looking at high tide, sections of marsh now flood. With a foot of sea-level rise, water laps at a few streets. Two feet, and some neighborhoods flood. Three feet, and portions of the evacuation route are awash - all at high water. No wonder he calls the future view of New Jersey, as envisioned by Rutgers University's new sea-level mapping tool, "disturbing.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Vicki Smith and Stacey Plaisance, Associated Press
BELLE CHASE, La. - Floodwaters from Isaac receded, power came on, and businesses opened Friday ahead of the holiday weekend, the beginning of what is certain to be a slow recovery for Louisiana. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney visited flood-ravaged communities, and President Obama said he would arrive Monday, appearances this part of the country is all too familiar with after Katrina and the gulf oil spill. Meanwhile, the leftovers from the storm pushed into the drought-stricken Midwest, knocking out power to thousands of people in Arkansas.
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