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NEWS
November 30, 2005 | By Paul R. Shelly
America's renown for attracting, to its institutions of higher education, the world's best and brightest students is at risk. Today, we have some significant rivals that include Britain, Germany, Australia, New Zealand and China. In the knowledge-based world economy of the 21st century, few dispute that premier status in higher education will surely be linked with economic might. In July 2002, a group of higher-education leaders from seven Western states gathered in San Diego to talk about this and related concerns.
NEWS
August 20, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this report.)
A University of Pennsylvania official yesterday termed "patently unfair" the proposed new federal tax revision legislation that could cost colleges and universities a bundle in lost revenue. "The question is one of fairness," said David Morse, Penn's director of federal relations. "The bill has been sold as one of fairness and equity. But in this case it is patently unfair. " One provision of the tax-overhaul bill would bar private universities - such as Penn - from issuing more than $150 million in tax-exempt bonds.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By May Va Lor
Thousands of New Jersey college students started classes recently. Even though tuition is soaring, college is a top priority for many families and students because the long-term benefits far outweigh the short-term costs. A college graduate earns more and has better job security and healthier families. Furthermore, higher education for New Jersey's sons and daughters improves the state's economy and public well-being. You would imagine that all these benefits would make funding higher education a top priority for state legislators.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marvin B. Pittman had just come home from his overnight job as a security guard when he turned on the TV to watch a replay of the third and final presidential debate last week. He was hoping, among other things, to get some insight into the candidates' stands on higher education. In the second debate, Pittman heard Vice President Gore mention something about a $10,000 deduction for college tuition and, as the father of two sons in college, he wanted to know more. "I watched the debate and there was nothing there.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | BY DR. JAMES H. MCCORMICK
The most important decision affecting the future of 95,000 Pennsylvania students will not be made in the classroom this fall. At the end of this month, the union representing the 5,500 professors at the State System of Higher Education will conduct a strike vote, threatening the education of students at our 14 universities. If the union decides not to continue good-faith bargaining, our students face delayed graduation. For 16 years, the State System has provided quality education at an affordable cost to more than 350,000 alumni.
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Some students at Burlington County College this year will be a bit younger than average. In fact, 57 of the new enrollees are so young that a few of them may have trouble reaching the water fountains on campus. The new college students, regularly fifth graders at Willingboro's Stuart Elementary School, will spend part of the school year at the community college exploring classes and higher-education opportunities as part of a pilot program sponsored by the college. "This is a way for students to discover just what a college education can mean," said Clarence Whittaker, associate dean of student assistance.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi and Associated Press
TRENTON — Labor unions representing faculty, staff, and others who would be affected by a bill to overhaul higher education in New Jersey have asked lawmakers to tweak the measure so that thousands of current employees are protected. The unions are seeking amendments that ensure collective bargaining rights and contracts, limit the authority of a new Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden governing board, and guarantee no layoffs at University Hospital in Newark by providing financial stability to the money-losing teaching hospital.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Set at a small college with low academic standards, Hammerstone takes a satirical look at higher education while reinforcing a simple lesson: Learn from one another. The play is scheduled to open tomorrow evening at the Spring Garden Mill Playhouse in Newtown. "It's a cynical comedy," said director Mark Cofta. "I'm a college teacher, and it's very truthful about some of the horror stories I've lived, in terms of students not knowing why they're getting an education and teachers not knowing why the students are there.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
America's higher education superiority - once taken for granted worldwide - is in danger of slipping away. Two bipartisan reports, one this week from the National Conference of State Legislatures and another in September from a commission appointed by U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, lament growing gaps in colleges' accessibility, affordability and accountability. They see a crisis brewing, especially for poor and minority students. But more than individual students would lose out. Without diverse, affordable universities, America will be unable to develop a workforce prepared to meet future needs.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett toured a Malvern factory powered by state-of-the-art robotics Tuesday, then hit the automatic-reset button on a replay of the state university tuition wars that dominated the battle over his first budget proposal last year. Corbett insisted to reporters during his tour of the high-tech Siemens Medical Solutions plant that his 2012-13 plan for a steep new cuts in state aid to higher education - including 30 percent less money to state-backed schools such as Pennsylvania State and Temple Universities - could be dealt with by reducing campus operating costs, not by raising tuition.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY BLONDELL REYNOLDS BROWN
  EVERY YEAR since 1987, Congress has designated the month of March to celebrate the contributions and accomplishments of women and to learn about the long road to gender equality paved by the courageous women who came before us. Women continue to break glass ceilings in all areas of life. Consider the amazing achievements of women in the last year: *  Janet Yellen became the first woman to serve as the Chair of the Federal Reserve Board in its 102-year history. * Last summer, it took a 13-year-old woman from Philadelphia to teach the world that girls can throw just as well as boys.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf and Senate Republicans on Wednesday resolved a dispute over a slate of last-minute nominees by outgoing Gov. Tom Corbett. The Senate confirmed 12 of Corbett's original 28 nominees, including former Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley as a Temple University trustee and Corbett's revenue secretary, Dan Meuser, to the State System of Higher Education's board of governors. Four others - including two Bucks County judges - are scheduled for confirmation at a later date.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
With New Jersey continuing its notorious "brain drain" export of more than 30,000 college students every year, much of the focus in higher education in 2014 remained on expansion: breaking ground on new academic buildings, increasing housing options at the state's public colleges, and offering new ways to obtain degrees. There also were leadership changes, a new name for one community college and - of course - political battles. Here's a look back at some of the changes in the higher education landscape last year: 1. Stockton buys Showboat Stockton College made clear it had no plan to stop its explosive growth with the high-profile purchase of the shuttered Showboat Atlantic City, which will house a campus in the resort.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bobby Fong, the president of Ursinus College, died suddenly Monday morning at his home of natural causes, the college announced. His wife of 40 years, Suzanne Dunham Fong, was by his side, according to a statement from the college. Fong, who was 64, one of a few Asian college presidents in the nation and had been at helm of the small liberal arts college in Collegeville since 2011. His death stunned the college community, which learned of his passing by an e-mail. "President Fong was a teacher and scholar before he became an academic administrator and he continued to be so even as a college president," said Lucien "Terry" Winegar, executive vice president for academic affairs and dean.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Former Pennsylvania Education Secretary Ron Tomalis has resigned as a special adviser to Gov. Corbett, amid questions about his duties and allegations that his position amounted to a "ghost job" on the state payroll. Acting Secretary of Education Carolyn Dumaresq on Tuesday announced Tomalis will leave his $140,000-a-year job as an adviser on higher education issues in two weeks. Democrats, however, vowed to keep the controversy alive in the gubernatorial race. Corbett had defended Tomalis after the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette last month reported he had done little since taking the adviser job after resigning as education secretary in May 2013 - while keeping the same salary.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of teenagers gather in downtown Camden each day, sleepily dragging backpacks - voluntarily - onto buses at 7:45 a.m. This is the summer? It is when your summer camp goes beyond theme parks, camping, and an obstacle course. Also on the agenda: homework, learning about slaughterhouses, and a trip to a landfill. Rowan University's Champ/Gear Up summer program isn't your stereotypical summer camp. Then again, it's not supposed to be. With the mission of supporting a path to college, the six-week summer program accepts dozens of middle and high school students from Camden each year, busing them from the city to day camp in an environmental center in Hammonton or the Rowan campus in Glassboro, where academic work is mixed with field trips and other activities that craftily combine learning with fun. "We're guiding you through, but the whole time, we're embedding in your mind the importance of school, the importance of learning," said Derrick Gallashaw, 34, a Champ/Gear Up staffer who helps lead the program.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graduating from the University of Pennsylvania with a strong desire to change the world and an excellent plan for how to do it? A new Penn program may fund you. Penn president Amy Gutmann has created "engagement prizes" of up to $150,000 - $50,000 for living expenses and $100,000 for project execution - for students with the most promising plans to improve local, national, or global conditions in the year after their graduation. "We want to maximize the encouragement we can give our students who do well by doing good in the world," Gutmann said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public higher education in New Jersey badly needs changes to become more affordable, accessible, and successful, legislators were told Wednesday during a hearing at Rowan University. Over 2 hours and 45 minutes, members of the Assembly's higher-education committee listened to students, administrators, and a faculty union president, all of whom agreed it was right for the Legislature to tackle reform of the state's public higher-education system. But their solutions varied, in some cases opposing legislators' proposals or urging caution.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN M. CRISP
AT A TIME when many students still see college as their best hope for a rewarding career, higher education has become more expensive, far outpacing the steady increase in the cost of living. As a consequence, average student debt at graduation is pushing $30,000. In some cases, student debt reaches a disheartening six figures. But falling beyond the reach of these daunting statistics are many capable students who don't accumulate student debt because they can't scrape together the means to go to college in the first place.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
Wednesday's "Love" column incorrectly named the band to whose music the couple walked down the aisle. It was the Avett Brothers' "Forever and Ever Amen. " A story Wednesday gave an incorrect figure for the amount of money the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education took from West Chester University this year. The correct figure is $1.6 million.
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