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Higher Education

NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
Terrel H. Bell, former U.S. secretary of education, has called for a "Marshall plan" to revive the nation's public colleges and universities. The plan comes out of a study titled, "To Secure the Blessings of Liberty. " It is the work of a 22-member commission appointed by the board of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, which represents 372 four-year institutions. Bell addressed the AASCU convention concerning the report in Phoenix on Monday. The report arrives with a certain irony.
NEWS
July 12, 1989 | By Ruth Masters, Special to The Inquirer Craig R. McCoy of the Inquirer Trenton Bureau contributed to this story
Since January, local governments and state-financed agencies had anxiously looked north to Trenton watching legislators grapple with ways to close a $500 million gap in revenues and come up with a new state budget. Finally, in the pre-dawn hours of July 1, the lawmakers agreed to new taxes and spending cuts, completing work on a $12 billion budget. The plan consists of a paltry 1 percent spending increase and in many cases cuts state allocations from 1989 levels. Here is how the fiscal fallout is affecting South Jersey: Higher education was slashed, leading to tuition increases and buying deferments at Rutgers University and Glassboro State College.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia high schools - one public and one diocesan - have been chosen to participate in a statewide effort to boost the number of high school graduates attending college, a higher education association announced yesterday. Olney High School and St. John Neumann High School, a boys' school in South Philadelphia, have joined the effort, called Project for Informed Choice, said Sister Matthew Anita MacDonald, president of Chestnut Hill College, who serves on the board of the Pennsylvania Association for Colleges and Universities.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The days leading to the approval of New Jersey's budget in June were chaotic, with fears of a July 1 government shutdown and rumors about what Republican Gov. Christie planned to do with the Democrats' spending proposal. On June 29, amid that din, Christie's office released an order to reorganize government - including a mandate to eliminate the Commission on Higher Education, which oversees the state's colleges and universities. No one seemed to notice. Not the college and university unions that now are outraged.
NEWS
July 12, 2005 | By David Warren Saxe
On Wednesday, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives passed a resolution of epic proportions - an initiative to ensure academic freedom in the Commonwealth's colleges and universities. Our representatives have established a select committee to examine the state of academic freedom and, though the legislation doesn't specifically say so, to discover whether the political left has indeed overwhelmed the great towers of academia and flooded the minds of its captive students with liberal pabulum and propaganda.
NEWS
December 12, 2008 | By Stephen M. Curtis
The financial crisis engulfing us has exacerbated a decade-old issue: the inability of many students to get an affordable higher education. A generation ago, the United States had the best-educated population in the world. Today, our nation ranks 10th among industrialized countries in the proportion of citizens aged 25 to 34 who have college degrees. And Mayor Nutter is one of many voices reminding us that Philadelphia ranks 92d out of the nation's largest 100 cities in college-degree attainment.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public and political sentiment is running high these days to set national education goals for elementary and high schools. That same demand for higher standards and greater accountability is certain to reach colleges and universities, a U.S. Education Department official said yesterday. David Longanecker, assistant secretary for post-secondary education, told an audience of about 200 community college teachers that such notions as national standards for students or teachers - once unthinkable at the college level - are likely to be seriously debated in coming years because of widespread skepticism about the performance of higher education.
NEWS
January 29, 2003 | By William C. Kashatus
Higher fees. Increasing consumerism. Greater influence of government and big business. The necessity to cut costs by compromising quality. Sound familiar? These trends resulted in the privatization of health care in the 1990s. The new frontier is higher education. In Killing the Spirit: Higher Education in America, historian Page Smith argues that the decline of America's colleges and universities is "directly related to the trend toward research and away from teaching. " Often, the "publish or perish" mentality, which fuels the pursuit of tenure, results in useless research and publications.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
You won't find these questions on any college exam: What local industry employs more workers in Philadelphia than Bell Atlantic, Blue Cross, Cigna, Mellon Bank, Peco, PNC and SmithKline - combined? What local industry's combined $5.9 billion annual budget would cover the cost to run the city for two years at a surplus of more than $600 million? What local industry's combined $2.2 billion in salaries and wages would be more than enough to pay city employees for two years?
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | By Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey college students can expect higher tuition, larger classes and fewer course offerings in the fall if Gov. Florio's proposed budget is approved. Florio wants to slash spending for higher education by 8 percent next year - a loss of millions of dollars at each campus. What's more, the budget proposal includes no funding for negotiated salary increases next year. That means college officials must either renege on contract agreements with professors and other unionized employees - and likely invite a legal challenge - or reach into their own pockets to pay for salary increases ordinarily funded by the state.
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