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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
COMPENSATION for private-college presidents has continued to drift upward, while the number crossing the $1 million barrier - a signal of prestige, and a magnet for criticism - has held steady at 36, according to a new survey. The latest annual compilation by the Chronicle of Higher Education covers data from 2010, due to lag time in the release of federal tax information. That year, median compensation for the 494 presidents in the survey - leaders of institutions with budgets of at least $50 million - was $396,649, or 2.8 percent higher than in last year's survey.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Eastern University has selected Robert G. Duffett, a veteran in Christian higher education, as its next president, officials announced Monday. He replaces David Black, who led the university for 15 years. Duffett, most recently the president of Dakota Wesleyan University, has worked in Christian higher education for 27 years. He starts at Eastern, a 4,400-student university in St. Davids, on July 1. - Susan Snyder
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | BY GEORGE LEEF
RALEIGH, N.C. - For many years, the conventional wisdom in the United States has been that the more people who graduate from college, the better off we'll be. It's time to challenge that "wisdom. " The evidence says it's wrong. In his first major address early in 2009, President Obama set forth a national goal of becoming first in the world in the percentage of college-educated citizens. Supposedly, that would make our economy more productive and competitive. The notion that the economy can be pulled up by processing more young people through college has lots of allure at the state level as well.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SPOKANE, Wash. - Young voters helped pass laws legalizing marijuana in Washington and Colorado, but many still won't be able to light up. Most universities have codes of conduct banning marijuana use, and they get millions of dollars in funding from the federal government, which still considers pot illegal. With the money comes a requirement for a drug-free campus, and the threat of expulsion for students using pot in the dorms. "Everything we've seen is that nothing changes for us," said Darin Watkins, a spokesman for Washington State University in Pullman.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's colleges would need to meet performance-based targets to win new state funding under a recommendation by Gov. Corbett's commission on higher education. The proposal calls for "performance scorecards" that would take into account measures such as controlling tuition costs, opening access to low-income students and other underserved groups, and tailoring programs to meet workforce needs. Among other measures recommended for consideration are closing achievement gaps, on-time graduation rates, and contributions to the state's economic development.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
Pennsylvania higher education officials took a contentious pay cut off the table in contract talks with state university faculty Friday, but the union said it intended to press ahead with strike-authorization votes next week. The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties said the sides remain at odds on issues including compensation for temporary instructors, health-care benefits, and online education. During talks Friday in Harrisburg, negotiators for the State System of Higher Education withdrew a proposal for a 35 percent salary cut for temporary, or adjunct, faculty.
NEWS
November 3, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly a year ago, Pennsylvania State University began its darkest chapter when former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was indicted for raping and molesting young boys. Now, the man who ran the university - former President Graham B. Spanier - has been indicted on allegations that he failed to stop Sandusky when he had the chance. Spanier, once among the nation's most respected university presidents, faces the prospect of ending his career as a felon. While there was widespread speculation for months about Spanier's being indicted, Thursday's announcement was no less chilling for those who had admiringly watched Spanier - once a child victim of physical abuse at the hands of his father - build a sterling career at Pennsylvania's flagship university.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Following a denied request for binding arbitration from the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, the union representing the faculty Saturday approved a strike authorization vote at its leadership meeting in State College Saturday. The leadership of the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties (APSCUF), meeting in State College, agreed to ask its members to take a strike authorization vote. The union's 6,000 members on all 14 campuses will take the vote in November.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
New Jersey voters have two ballot questions to consider, one would give a boost to higher education, and the other would require judges to pay more for employee benefits. Voters should say YES to a $750 million bond issue for the state's public and private universities. The state hasn't approved a bond issue for higher education in nearly a quarter-century. Meanwhile, state funding for colleges has been slashed. The bond money would be used to expand classroom and lab space. Community colleges as well as state universities and private colleges would benefit.
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