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Hilary Koprowski

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NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen Graham Cancer Center at Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | By PETER BINZEN
Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that "an institution is the lengthened shadow of one man," and in West Philadelphia there's a classic illustration of his dictum. The institution is Wistar Institute. The man is Hilary Koprowski. When the acclaimed virologist and immunologist was named its director in 1957, Wistar, the nation's oldest independent biomedical research center, had a staff of about 30 and a budget of little more than $100,000. It was, according to one scientific publication, "a dilapidated museum.
LIVING
November 6, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a cold day in January 1948, Hilary Koprowski lifted a glass beaker in his laboratory at Pearl River, N.Y., and gulped down an oily liquid made with ground-up cotton-rat brain that had been infected with live polio virus. He survived. Two years later, that glop of goo became the world's first oral polio vaccine to be administered to human subjects - 20 boys and girls at a nearby home for retarded children. Ultimately, Koprowski, who went on to become the longtime director of Philadelphia's Wistar Institute, lost the race to get his vaccine licensed in the United States.
NEWS
November 28, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two scientists who have made pioneering contributions in developing new vaccines and grains were awarded the John Scott Award and $10,000 each yesterday. The awards, which are made by the Board of Directors of City Trusts, a public agency, were given to Hilary Koprowski for his contributions to rabies research and Orville S. Vogel for inventing semidwarf wheats, which have helped increase the world's food supplies. Koprowski is director of the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and Vogel is a professor emeritus at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A half-century ago, on Feb. 27, 1950, Dr. Hilary Koprowski administered the first-ever dose of an oral polio vaccine to a child. Koprowski, then a 33-year-old research scientist, would go on to a brilliant career in medicine in Philadelphia, discovering vaccines to defeat German measles and rabies, and producing man-made antibodies to fight cancer. But his development of the first successful oral polio vaccine, even though later vaccines bearing the names of Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin would become more widely used, stands as one of the century's signal achievments.
NEWS
April 28, 2001
Imagine being wrongly depicted as the rat who caused the plague. Imagine being unfairly blamed for infecting 53 million people with a fatal disease. Noted Philadelphia scientist Hilary Koprowski has suffered that fate for nine years because of an erroneous, published theory that tagged him as the father of AIDS. In an emotional letter to The Inquirer last fall, he wrote: "I have but one reputation. It is the sum of all my works and all my accomplishments for the last 60 years.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A panel of scientists has concluded there is little likelihood that Hilary Koprowski, an internationally known Philadelphia medical researcher, accidentally helped launch the AIDS epidemic in the 1950s. The six-member panel was set up by the Wistar Institute to investigate a theory put forward by Tom Curtis, a freelance writer, that Koprowski may have inadvertently spread the AIDS virus to people during trials of an oral polio vaccine in 1957 in the Belgian Congo, now known as Zaire.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, an internationally known scientist who helped develop vaccines against rabies and polio, was awarded the prestigious Philadelphia Award last night. The $25,000 award, which is given annually to a Philadelphian who has set an example by serving the "best and largest interests of the community," was presented to Koprowski during ceremonies at the College of Physicians at 19 S. 22d St. Koprowski, 73, is giving the award to the Wistar Institute, which he has directed since 1957.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wistar Institute and its former director, Hilary Koprowski, have settled a bitter dispute that has racked the Philadelphia biomedical institution for the last two years. Attorneys for both parties refused to discuss details of the settlement, which was announced yesterday morning, minutes before a jury trial was scheduled to begin in U.S. District Court. Wistar officials said that Giovanni Rovera, who replaced Koprowski as director in the spring of 1991, will continue to serve as the institute's top administrator.
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NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
NEWS
September 28, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge Monday listened to the growing rift between renowned 93-year-old vaccine researcher Hilary Koprowski and his employer, Thomas Jefferson University. The scientist was seeking a court order to stop Jefferson from reducing his office space until his discrimination suit is heard. But beneath the squabble over rooms were profound issues of money, aging, progress, and respect. "I don't know where this thing went off track," said U.S. District Judge Berle M. Schiller, after a two-hour hearing.
NEWS
September 27, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Monday listened to the growing rift between renowned 93-year-old vaccine researcher Hilary Koprowski and his employer, Thomas Jefferson University. The scientist was seeking a court order to stop Jefferson from reducing his office space until his discrimination suit is heard. But beneath the squabble over rooms were profound issues of money, aging, progress, and respect. "I don't know where this thing went off track," said U.S. District Court Judge Berle M. Schiller, after a two-hour hearing.
NEWS
August 11, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a dispute with an air of déjà vu, Hilary Koprowski - the brilliant and feisty 93-year-old researcher who developed the first oral polio vaccine - is suing Thomas Jefferson University, where he moved in 1992 after being ousted as director of the Wistar Institute. In legal papers filed Friday in federal court in Philadelphia, Koprowski claims Jefferson has violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by refusing to let him retain - at his own expense - five employees who help him deal with age-related infirmities that "affect his ability to sit, stand, walk, and hear.
NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After testing samples from hundreds of monkeys being sold as "bush meat" in central Africa's markets, scientists have developed the most detailed theory yet for how the AIDS virus entered the human population. HIV-1, the most widespread of the viruses causing AIDS, apparently emerged through a chain of primates eating other primates - humans picking up the virus from chimpanzees, who acquired it from monkeys. The findings are published in today's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About a year ago, three very unusual goats were born. Although they look like any other goats - in fact, they all look the same - Boo, Whoopee and Jackie are genetically engineered to carry genes from a malaria parasite. If the experiment they are participating in continues as hoped, their milk - and that of their genetically modified relatives - will contain material that can be purified and used as a vaccine in the developing world. You wouldn't actually drink the milk. But a herd of goats would act as a sort of factory, producing nearly finished vaccine that could then be packaged into uniform doses.
NEWS
April 28, 2001
Imagine being wrongly depicted as the rat who caused the plague. Imagine being unfairly blamed for infecting 53 million people with a fatal disease. Noted Philadelphia scientist Hilary Koprowski has suffered that fate for nine years because of an erroneous, published theory that tagged him as the father of AIDS. In an emotional letter to The Inquirer last fall, he wrote: "I have but one reputation. It is the sum of all my works and all my accomplishments for the last 60 years.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | By Huntly Collins INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The controversial theory that researchers at Philadelphia's Wistar Institute triggered the global AIDS epidemic when they tested an experimental polio vaccine in Africa during the 1950s has been refuted by four laboratories around the world. In studies published today, the labs report that sophisticated DNA tests showed no evidence the oral polio vaccine was contaminated with the chimpanzee version of the AIDS virus. About one million people in the former Belgian Congo, known as Congo today, participated in the vaccine trials.
LIVING
November 6, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a cold day in January 1948, Hilary Koprowski lifted a glass beaker in his laboratory at Pearl River, N.Y., and gulped down an oily liquid made with ground-up cotton-rat brain that had been infected with live polio virus. He survived. Two years later, that glop of goo became the world's first oral polio vaccine to be administered to human subjects - 20 boys and girls at a nearby home for retarded children. Ultimately, Koprowski, who went on to become the longtime director of Philadelphia's Wistar Institute, lost the race to get his vaccine licensed in the United States.
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