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Hillerich Bradsby

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NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By George F. Will
I don't want to wax mystical and metaphysical about this, but . . . Stop. I want to wax. If an American boy can't get all worked up about a genuine "powerized" Louisville Slugger baseball bat, what use is the First Amendment's guarantee of the free exercise of religion? When Thomas Aquinas was ginning up proofs of God's existence, he neglected to mention the ash tree. It is the source of the Louisville Slugger, and hence is conclusive evidence that a kindly Mind superintends the universe.
SPORTS
June 13, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like forest sentries protecting the tall trees that stand behind them on this verdant mountain slope, multiflora rosebushes and thorny raspberry vines grab at Jack Norton's pantlegs. Norton pushes on undeterred. He knows these thick northwestern Pennsylvania woods. As a boy, he planted five million Christmas trees one summer in nearby fields. Later, he helped clear ground for the Blueberry Hill Golf Club, a sparsely played course just up the road. Walking slowly now through the 1,000-acre lot his lumber company owns, Norton points out cherry, hemlock and beech trees before he spots his prey - a 75-foot-high white ash, growing tall and straight in a damp, leafy bed of ferns and wild grasses.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dan Majors, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
For close to 50 years, it sat in a corner of an attic, just another dusty, forgotten piece of wood with an obscure name stamped into it: Momen Clemente. That piece of lumber - a Roberto Clemente bat from the seventh game of the 1960 World Series - was among memorabilia auctioned Thursday night at the National Sports Collectors Convention at Baltimore's Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It sold for $41,825. Other items up for bid included a loving cup given to Honus Wagner in 1917 ($44,812.50)
SPORTS
May 29, 2008
THE HEADLINE WAS compelling for several reasons. A mother and father from my hometown of Wayne, N.J., had filed suit against metal bat manufacturer Hillerich & Bradsby and Little League baseball after their son was left brain damaged from a batted ball. Joseph and Nancy Domalewski also named The Sports Authority in their product-liability lawsuit filed Monday in state Superior Court in Paterson (where my mom once worked), recharging a debate over the use of metal bats in youth leagues, and the technology used in making them lighter, faster and possibly more dangerous.
SPORTS
November 28, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bat shines a polished black as the late afternoon sun picks up the barrel's wooden grain, the silver script reading "Louisville Slugger," "Philadelphia Phillies," and the distinctively intertwined "P" and "B" of Pat Burrell's cramped, efficient signature. Lying still in the factory, as if hibernating in November's chill, Burrell's bat seems to glow with potential and the eternal promise of the coming spring's new baseball beginnings. They have been making Louisville Slugger baseball bats along the Ohio River since 1884, when John A. Hillerich handcrafted a bat for Pete "The Old Gladiator" Browning, the star of the Louisville Eclipse.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
A New Jersey teenager left with brain damage after being struck by a line drive off a metal bat while playing in a youth baseball game will receive $14.5 million to settle his lawsuit against the bat manufacturer, Little League Baseball, and a sporting-goods chain. The settlement of Steven Domalewski's lawsuit was announced in Superior Court in Passaic County on Wednesday. The boy, 18, lives in Wayne. His family had claimed the metal bat was unsafe because baseballs could carom off it at much faster speeds than off wooden bats.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's an air of "Mr. Wizard" and "Leave It to Beaver" inside the office of Jeff Di Tullio. High-tech electronics next to model airplanes. A desk swamped in notebooks. A duffel bag filled with baseball bats. Is this a place for work or play? Some days it's both, says Di Tullio, 31, an instructor in aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology here. Di Tullio has come up with an invention - a simple dimple - that could revolutionize America's favorite game.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1986 | By Peter Binzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When New York Mets catcher Gary Carter crouches behind home plate as the National League championship series opens tonight in Houston, he'll be wearing a special hand-sewn leather glove designed by a South Jersey entrepreneur. According to Carol A.J. Stanley, Carter has been wearing her patented mitt for extra protection inside his regular glove since returning to the lineup after he tore a ligament in his left thumb on Aug. 16. The Mets star has thus joined what Stanley hopes will be a growing list of major league baseball players using the Stan-Mill Mitt.
SPORTS
March 27, 1997 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
It must be spring-cleaning time, because lately I've gotten quite a few inquiries regarding obscure collectibles that seem to be turning up. I've compiled a few of the most interesting ones for this column. (I'm always happy to send a personal reply, but I ask that a self-addressed, stamped envelope be enclosed.) Question: I have a small, wooden pencil shaped like a baseball bat. It has the name Frankie Hayes on it and also Atlantic "White Flash. " Do you know anything about this and approximate value?
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Gary A. Warner, Orange County Register
America is full of baseball pilgrimages and road trips. Fenway Park in Boston turns 100 this year. Wrigleyville, the neighborhood around Wrigley Field in Chicago, is the best baseball neighborhood in the country. California has five major-league teams to visit. New York City has two major-league teams and two minor-league ones. Road trippers can enjoy the Pioneer League with stops in Montana, Idaho, and Utah. But for me, a road trip from Louisville to Cooperstown is the quintessential baseball journey.
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NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
A New Jersey teenager left with brain damage after being struck by a line drive off a metal bat while playing in a youth baseball game will receive $14.5 million to settle his lawsuit against the bat manufacturer, Little League Baseball, and a sporting-goods chain. The settlement of Steven Domalewski's lawsuit was announced in Superior Court in Passaic County on Wednesday. The boy, 18, lives in Wayne. His family had claimed the metal bat was unsafe because baseballs could carom off it at much faster speeds than off wooden bats.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dan Majors, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
For close to 50 years, it sat in a corner of an attic, just another dusty, forgotten piece of wood with an obscure name stamped into it: Momen Clemente. That piece of lumber - a Roberto Clemente bat from the seventh game of the 1960 World Series - was among memorabilia auctioned Thursday night at the National Sports Collectors Convention at Baltimore's Oriole Park at Camden Yards. It sold for $41,825. Other items up for bid included a loving cup given to Honus Wagner in 1917 ($44,812.50)
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Gary A. Warner, Orange County Register
America is full of baseball pilgrimages and road trips. Fenway Park in Boston turns 100 this year. Wrigleyville, the neighborhood around Wrigley Field in Chicago, is the best baseball neighborhood in the country. California has five major-league teams to visit. New York City has two major-league teams and two minor-league ones. Road trippers can enjoy the Pioneer League with stops in Montana, Idaho, and Utah. But for me, a road trip from Louisville to Cooperstown is the quintessential baseball journey.
SPORTS
May 29, 2008
THE HEADLINE WAS compelling for several reasons. A mother and father from my hometown of Wayne, N.J., had filed suit against metal bat manufacturer Hillerich & Bradsby and Little League baseball after their son was left brain damaged from a batted ball. Joseph and Nancy Domalewski also named The Sports Authority in their product-liability lawsuit filed Monday in state Superior Court in Paterson (where my mom once worked), recharging a debate over the use of metal bats in youth leagues, and the technology used in making them lighter, faster and possibly more dangerous.
SPORTS
November 28, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bat shines a polished black as the late afternoon sun picks up the barrel's wooden grain, the silver script reading "Louisville Slugger," "Philadelphia Phillies," and the distinctively intertwined "P" and "B" of Pat Burrell's cramped, efficient signature. Lying still in the factory, as if hibernating in November's chill, Burrell's bat seems to glow with potential and the eternal promise of the coming spring's new baseball beginnings. They have been making Louisville Slugger baseball bats along the Ohio River since 1884, when John A. Hillerich handcrafted a bat for Pete "The Old Gladiator" Browning, the star of the Louisville Eclipse.
SPORTS
June 13, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like forest sentries protecting the tall trees that stand behind them on this verdant mountain slope, multiflora rosebushes and thorny raspberry vines grab at Jack Norton's pantlegs. Norton pushes on undeterred. He knows these thick northwestern Pennsylvania woods. As a boy, he planted five million Christmas trees one summer in nearby fields. Later, he helped clear ground for the Blueberry Hill Golf Club, a sparsely played course just up the road. Walking slowly now through the 1,000-acre lot his lumber company owns, Norton points out cherry, hemlock and beech trees before he spots his prey - a 75-foot-high white ash, growing tall and straight in a damp, leafy bed of ferns and wild grasses.
SPORTS
March 27, 1997 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
It must be spring-cleaning time, because lately I've gotten quite a few inquiries regarding obscure collectibles that seem to be turning up. I've compiled a few of the most interesting ones for this column. (I'm always happy to send a personal reply, but I ask that a self-addressed, stamped envelope be enclosed.) Question: I have a small, wooden pencil shaped like a baseball bat. It has the name Frankie Hayes on it and also Atlantic "White Flash. " Do you know anything about this and approximate value?
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's an air of "Mr. Wizard" and "Leave It to Beaver" inside the office of Jeff Di Tullio. High-tech electronics next to model airplanes. A desk swamped in notebooks. A duffel bag filled with baseball bats. Is this a place for work or play? Some days it's both, says Di Tullio, 31, an instructor in aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology here. Di Tullio has come up with an invention - a simple dimple - that could revolutionize America's favorite game.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1986 | By Peter Binzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When New York Mets catcher Gary Carter crouches behind home plate as the National League championship series opens tonight in Houston, he'll be wearing a special hand-sewn leather glove designed by a South Jersey entrepreneur. According to Carol A.J. Stanley, Carter has been wearing her patented mitt for extra protection inside his regular glove since returning to the lineup after he tore a ligament in his left thumb on Aug. 16. The Mets star has thus joined what Stanley hopes will be a growing list of major league baseball players using the Stan-Mill Mitt.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By George F. Will
I don't want to wax mystical and metaphysical about this, but . . . Stop. I want to wax. If an American boy can't get all worked up about a genuine "powerized" Louisville Slugger baseball bat, what use is the First Amendment's guarantee of the free exercise of religion? When Thomas Aquinas was ginning up proofs of God's existence, he neglected to mention the ash tree. It is the source of the Louisville Slugger, and hence is conclusive evidence that a kindly Mind superintends the universe.
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