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NEWS
April 15, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Hundreds of Hindu pilgrims, rushing to cleanse themselves of their sins in the holy Ganges River, were caught in a stampede in which at least 47 people were trampled or to death or suffocated and 39 were injured, authorities said yesterday. The crowd was part of about 4 million people who had flooded Haridwar, 120 miles north of New Delhi, for the climax of the Kumbh Mela, a Hindu festival held every 12 years. District Administrator P.K. Goswami said the stampede occurred at 5 a.m., several minutes after sunrise, near the Har-ki-Pauri bathing ghat, a flight of white-marble steps leading down to the Ganges and the spot considered the holiest location for the immersions.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Eight figures considered to be messengers of peace in the Hindu religion will be brought to life in a musical-dance-drama to be presented Saturday at the Voorhees Middle School. The program, Shanti-Doot (Messenger of Peace) will start with the Lord Krishna, "the first messenger of peace on the earth," according to Lata Pimplaskar, a board member of Arsha Vidya Gurukulam, a traditional Indian school in Saylorsburg, Pa. It will end with Mohandas K. Gandhi, who is considered a significant messenger "because his biggest message was non- violence," she said.
LIVING
May 4, 1997 | By Reena S. Pawar, FOR THE INQUIRER
The setting is a simple, suburban house on a busy street in Langhorne. Inside, a group of about 30 people settle into low-slung chairs in a sunny room for a weekend camp on karma (action), bhakti (devotion) and gyana (knowledge) this recent Saturday morning. In holding the weekend camp at their center, the members of Chinmaya Mission are fulfilling one of the primary aims of founder Swami Chinmayananda: to spread the message of Vedanta, the Hindu "science of life. " The camp aimed to unlock some of the mysteries of the Bhagavad Gita, the sacred Hindu text, by studying portions of it closely.
LIVING
March 6, 1997 | By W. Speers This article contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Post, New York Daily News and New York Times
Pandurang Shastri Athavale, who 40 years ago founded a group based on helping the poor, yesterday won the world's richest prize in any field, the $1.2 mil Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. Athavale, 76, said he'll put the money back into his 200,000-member Swadhyaya movement, which sponsors housing and farming projects in India. It's benefited an estimated 20 million people in nearly 100,000 villages without a single paid staff worker or a headquarters. "I don't want anything from any villager," said Athavale, "not even a cup of coffee.
NEWS
November 10, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After living for five years in a village near Bombay, Dev Cosenzo came back to the United States in 1988 steeped in the traditions of Indian culture. One of those traditions was mehndi, the art of body painting. Indians have been using mehndi for thousands of years as a way of combining the human impulse for self-decoration with their Hindu beliefs. But the practice was largely unknown in the United States, where for many years tattoos have been the preferred method for those interested in adorning the skin.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | By Jonathan Gelb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's not every day that a guru with millions of followers comes to this suburban township of a few thousand residents. But that's what happened yesterday on Conestoga Road when Bangaru Adigalaar, a Hindu-inspired spiritual leader from India, greeted hundreds of followers who waited barefoot in line to pray with him. Adigalaar, whose silvery, spiked hair reached toward the sky, sat on a throne as men, women and children hunched over his...
LIVING
October 29, 1995 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The waitress, a quietly attentive African American woman, brings the dessert - a narrow circle of bread pudding adrift in an amber glaze - and places it in front of Dinesh D'Souza, the writer and social critic. D'Souza, who grew up in Bombay, India, but developed a taste for Eurocentric culture and conservative politics after coming to the United States at 17 as a Rotary Club exchange student, slices off a tiny, pie-like wedge and consumes it with miserly care. D'Souza's critics might observe that here, as with his controversial new book, The End of Racism, the writer apparently wants to have his pudding and eat it, too. He wants his work to be blunt and aggressive, a bare-knuckled, wake-up punch to African Americans and benighted liberals, and at the same time he wants to be viewed as a serious, sensitive intellect with useful things to say about the state of American race relations.
NEWS
October 2, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
Ram Dass, Sixties figurehead turned New Age grayhead, was the man of the hour. The Omega Institute, a New Age retreat center tucked in the hills above the Hudson River, was grand-opening a library in his name. Accolades poured down like rose petals. Speakers praised the pioneering apostle of Hindu spirituality as "a pure soul," "an intrepid traveler of the universe" who displays "an authenticity to his being. " Singers led 300 acolytes and spiritual seekers in rousing devotional chants in his honor.
NEWS
October 26, 1998 | JAY GORODETZER / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Chandrima Ganguly prays during the Kali Puja ceremony at Penndale Middle School in Lansdale. Saturday's Puja, or ritual worship, honored the Hindu goddess Kali, destroyer of evil, seeking her strength against the coming winter. The ceremony was the last celebration of the Hindu autumn festival.
NEWS
December 7, 1992 | Daily News wire services
KABUL AFGHANS RETURN TO CIVIL WAR Rockets and artillery shells exploded across the capital yesterday in a new round of combat between Iranian-backed Shiite Moslem guerrillas and troops loyal to the interim Islamic government. Doctors said at least 20 people died, but that did not include many victims who were buried immediately by relatives. At least 360 people, mostly civilians, were wounded, doctors said. A 3-month-old peace was broken. AYODHYA, INDIA MOSQUE'S RAZING 'ALERTS' A NATION Hindu fundamentalists used pickaxes and crowbars yesterday to raze a 430- year-old mosque they say was built on the site where a main Hindu deity was born.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama has invited India's new prime minister, Narendra Modi, to the White House, squashing a State Department ban that kept Modi out of the United States when he was the Hindu-nationalist leader of business-oriented Gujarat state. Is the new leader a friendly capitalist, or a dangerous sectarian? I asked business leaders and scholars from Philadelphia's rising Indian community. Highlights: "The promise of a competent government and rapid economic growth have trounced the feudal forces of caste and regional interests," says Kris Singh , the India-born, Penn-trained engineer who built Marlton-based Holtec International into a global power-plant supplier.
TRAVEL
February 11, 2013 | By St. John Barned-Smith, Washington Post
I peered over the edge of the Queen's Bath, an immaculate, now-empty pool where the ladies of one of India's great empires once bathed. Then my guide, Kumar, pointed outside. "That's the moat," he said, motioning toward a deep trench ringing the building we were in. "The king filled it with crocodiles so that no one could watch the queen in her bath. " The bath was just one of many amazing buildings that I saw during my visit to Hampi, a small town in the southwestern Indian state of Karnataka.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
R USSELL BRAND and Katy Perry actually went through with it. The hirsute British rascal and the busty U.S. pop star deemed too dangerous for "Sesame Street," were married Saturday at the luxury Aman-e-Khas resort and tiger reserve in northwestern India, an anonymous hotel official said. Although we don't believe that either Russell or Katy is Hindu, a Hindu priest conducted the ceremony, which was attended by family and close friends. Security was strict. Because a London magazine had exclusive rights to the affair, photographers and reporters from other outlets were not allowed on the property.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last year Kitty Bleyler and Alva Mullikin played field hockey for Upper Darby High School, the team won five, lost three, and tied one. Not bad for "the two little shorties" who powered the attack from right and left wing, recalled Mullikin. Though they stood barely 5 feet high, the pair would race down the field, outpacing even their own teammates. "Oh, those were the days," Kitty Bleyler, now Katherine Rann, recalled at a luncheon for centenarians in Delaware County.
NEWS
May 24, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A part of Bhoo Devi was still a tub of mud last week. But as two priests crouched on the floor Thursday, scooping out the mud and shaping it - here a hand, there a foot, now a face - it took on the coarse, dark contours of a goddess: the deity revered by Hindus as Bhoo Devi, or "Mother Earth. " "This is soil from the seven holiest rivers in India," explained Kasiram Dikshith, a priest of the new Bharatiya Temple in Chalfont, where Bhoo Devi was taking shape. Around him, a dozen Hindu priests from across India were busily weaving sacred grass and making intricate yantras, or mandalas, out of colored rice.
NEWS
May 5, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a bucolic Chester County township that values open space, a Hindu sect's request to build a temple about two-thirds the size of a football field has caused a stir. The group, which has been meeting in a West Pikeland Township farmhouse since 2000, says a new complex is needed not for its small congregation but rather for its statues, which become living gods once installed. And those living gods, members say, need their space. On March 16, the township rejected the request for a 35,470-square-foot temple complex, approving a 5,000-square-foot building.
NEWS
December 4, 2008 | By Rick Santorum
Dealing with terrorism in India is being called President-elect Barack Obama's first foreign-policy test. As we saw last week in Mumbai, political and religious divisions in the world's largest democracy make our disagreements seem tame by comparison. So when Obama named economist Sonal Shah to his transition team, the unifier invited division. From India to the United States, Hindus, Muslims and Christians criticized her appointment, alleging that she has links to Hindu militants.
NEWS
November 8, 2008 | By Bryce McDevitt INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many in the Indian community in the Philadelphia area are celebrating Diwali, a Hindu religious festival that is also a secular holiday, a time to take pride in Indian culture and identity. "Anyone can walk in and really get an immersion into Indian culture, and learn about Diwali and what it means," said Jennifer Au, director of grants and international programs for the YMCA of the Upper Main Line in Berwyn. "It's our way of promoting global awareness. " Diwali is the most widely observed holiday in India, Au said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angry comic on meditative path Michael Richards, who was defrocked as a comic last year after he spewed a racist rant during a stand-up gig, has gone Siddhartha: He is on a spiritual journey in Cambodia. "That night, when I was insulted and disrupted, I lost my heart; I lost my sense of humor," Richards said of his night of shame. Richards, 57, who is questing with his fianc?e, Beth Skipp, sometimes hangs with folk from the L.A.-based Nithyananda Foundation, which follows the teachings of 29-year-old Hindu monk Nithyananda, who, his group says, is "on a mission to reestablish the science of inner bliss on planet Earth.
NEWS
June 17, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a century after she lived in a rowhouse on Sansom Street, a chain-smoking mystic and her teachings still attract spiritual seekers and the curious. Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky helped introduce Eastern religions to the West and practiced the occult. She inspired devotion and suspicion, and some researchers say the modern "New Age" movement began with her. Blavatsky was a cofounder of theosophy, which the Concise Oxford English Dictionary defines as "various philosophies professing to achieve a knowledge of God by spiritual ecstasy, direct intuition, or special individual relations, especially a modern movement following Hindu and Buddhist teachings and seeking universal brotherhood.
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