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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
It was written off as just a fad but, like Groove B Chill said, "ain't nothing like hip-hop music. " And now the multimillion-dollar sound can be heard everywhere. Here are some spots to check it out in the city: Saturday at La Tazza there's a record-release party for Department of Rec and Kenneth Masters that has attracted the skills of Low Budget, Kwestion and 103.9's Jay-Ski. Monday, get down with the underground at Fluid's "The Remedy" with Rich Medina and Cosmo. And Wednesday, step into Sugar Mom's for a listen to Seedwest and Shaun Abu. Or return to Fluid on Wednesday for a treat when Lord Finesse - not a misprint, the Parental Advisory rapper also DJs - spins a set.
NEWS
August 24, 2000 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
Hip-hop music suffered a nasty blow on Tuesday when the "2000 Source Awards" were canceled halfway through the ceremony after a brawl erupted. The fight that ended the show at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium involved "so many people you couldn't even tell," according to an eyewitness. It was the second fight of the evening. Philly's own Eve was lucky enough to receive the first award of the evening. The Martin Luther King High School grad was honored with the Best New Artist trophy at the only mainstream awards show specifically for hip-hop music.
NEWS
September 19, 1996
There's a message in the death, life and art of rapper Tupac Shakur for those too offended by his violent, profane and misogynous behavior ever to listen to his work. It bears being heard by parents and all adult members of the Tupac Is a Thug club. They may not realize that rap or hip-hop music is one of the major styles popular among those twenty-something and younger, regardless of race, income or locale. Gangsta rap, Shakur's style, is a subset whose appeal is strongest among young black people in cities but probably will be heard by your child at some point.
NEWS
December 31, 2007 | By Michael Strambler
Movie trailers are great for sparking the imagination. Believe it or not, as I watched the trailer to The Great Debaters, a movie based on a true story of how a debate team from a small black college defeated a top-ranked white debate team, I found myself imagining the merger of debate and hip-hop. Yes, hip-hop. The movie, released on Christmas, stars Denzel Washington as Melvin Tolson, a dynamic debate-team coach at Wiley College who takes his team to unchartered territory - a square-off with Harvard's debate team - and wins.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
I 'M SICK and tired of hearing people equate hip-hop music with murder. I know why they do it, I just think truly intelligent people would never make that correlation. I think with the recent rise of "black on black crime" in Philadelphia, most people think it makes sense to point the finger at the one thing that runs through this community, its love of hip-hop. But the violent nature of some forms of hip-hop is a minuscule factor in black-on-black violence," and may not exist at all. So, why is this violence so prevalent in the African-American community?
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Jenice Armstrong
AT MONDAY'S news conference announcing Jay-Z's Budweiser music festival, a fan shouted out, "You're the best, Hov!" "I agree," he said. I don't. Not to sound like an old fogy, but hits of his such as "99 Problems" may be catchy, but I can't get with all the b-words and other misogynistic lyrics in Jay-Z's music. It felt bizarre to me to see the performer of such awful songs as "Big Pimpin'" and "Girls, Girls, Girls" standing with Mayor Nutter acting like some kind of hero.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bradley Butler, 44, of Camden, a popular DJ who provided music at parties in the region, died Tuesday, Feb. 18, of liver failure at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. The oldest of three children, he was born in Philadelphia and grew up in East Camden. He graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in 1988 and attended Camden County College. As a young man, he held several jobs at home improvement and clothing stores, and later worked for the Camden public schools on the bookmobile.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To become one of the 15 members of Dance Fusion, you've got to know some pretty funky moves. You would have to audition for a spot on the traveling dance squad every year, even if you were previously a member. You would have to memorize high-energy choreography. You would have to practice at least two hours daily. But most important, you would absolutely, positively have to perfect the delicate intricacies of the Hokey Pokey. "We do it before every show" a group of the energetic teenagers yelled in excitement about the childhood game.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
DJ Ross is providing something unique to Philadelphia during his weekly Friday night parties at Cafe Spice in Old City. Ross spins hip-hop with a twist of Indian music. "It's not just hip-hop or 50 Cent. I like the way he mixes the Indian music and plays the regular hit songs, and then mixes them with the Bollywood. It's a good mix of music," says 26-year-old Philadelphian Prashant Joshi. DJ Ross, a Philadelphian by way of New York, blends music from various styles including hip-hop, reggaeton, Indian pop, Bollywood and bhangra.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
When MTV debuted 17 years ago, it offered nothing more than kinetic deejays and 'round-the-clock videos. Now the channel boasts a variety of shows that have become embedded in pop culture - everything from "Beavis and Butt-head" to "Road Rules.' In some recent retooling, the channel's programmers decided the focus had strayed too far from music and dumped buff but superficial deejays Simon Rex and Idalis. A new video-intensive show, "12 Angry Viewers" was born, on which disaffected viewers make their own video picks, and "MTV Live" debuted, featuring deejays with less beauty but more musical knowledge.
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NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bradley Butler, 44, of Camden, a popular DJ who provided music at parties in the region, died Tuesday, Feb. 18, of liver failure at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. The oldest of three children, he was born in Philadelphia and grew up in East Camden. He graduated from Woodrow Wilson High School in 1988 and attended Camden County College. As a young man, he held several jobs at home improvement and clothing stores, and later worked for the Camden public schools on the bookmobile.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Jenice Armstrong
AT MONDAY'S news conference announcing Jay-Z's Budweiser music festival, a fan shouted out, "You're the best, Hov!" "I agree," he said. I don't. Not to sound like an old fogy, but hits of his such as "99 Problems" may be catchy, but I can't get with all the b-words and other misogynistic lyrics in Jay-Z's music. It felt bizarre to me to see the performer of such awful songs as "Big Pimpin'" and "Girls, Girls, Girls" standing with Mayor Nutter acting like some kind of hero.
NEWS
December 31, 2007 | By Michael Strambler
Movie trailers are great for sparking the imagination. Believe it or not, as I watched the trailer to The Great Debaters, a movie based on a true story of how a debate team from a small black college defeated a top-ranked white debate team, I found myself imagining the merger of debate and hip-hop. Yes, hip-hop. The movie, released on Christmas, stars Denzel Washington as Melvin Tolson, a dynamic debate-team coach at Wiley College who takes his team to unchartered territory - a square-off with Harvard's debate team - and wins.
NEWS
September 19, 2007 | By JUSTIN D. ROSS
WHEN IT COMES to sexism and racism in hip-hop, I'm part of the problem. Let me explain. I love hip-hop - have ever since it first came on the scene when I was in elementary school. Over the years, I've bought hundreds of tapes, CDs and downloads, gone to countless rap concerts, even worn my favorite artists' clothing lines. We used to think of hip-hop as just a black thing, but it's not. The largest share of rap music sales in America goes to white listeners. That would be me. So I'm not just sounding off when I say this: It's time for a boycott of all rap music that stereotypes African-Americans or insults and degrades women.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Idle it is not. Wild it is most assuredly. Set in Prohibition-era Georgia, Idlewild boasts yesterday's style, today's music, and the Harlem Renaissance's romanticism. A hip-hop musical that might be dubbed Moulin Noir or Under the Peachtree Moon, it was conceived for and stars OutKast duo Andr? Benjamin and Antwan A. Patton (better known as Andr? 3000 and Big Boi). They are, as might be expected, terrific in the musical numbers and painfully self-conscious in the dramatic sequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2006 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
DJ Ross is providing something unique to Philadelphia during his weekly Friday night parties at Cafe Spice in Old City. Ross spins hip-hop with a twist of Indian music. "It's not just hip-hop or 50 Cent. I like the way he mixes the Indian music and plays the regular hit songs, and then mixes them with the Bollywood. It's a good mix of music," says 26-year-old Philadelphian Prashant Joshi. DJ Ross, a Philadelphian by way of New York, blends music from various styles including hip-hop, reggaeton, Indian pop, Bollywood and bhangra.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
I 'M SICK and tired of hearing people equate hip-hop music with murder. I know why they do it, I just think truly intelligent people would never make that correlation. I think with the recent rise of "black on black crime" in Philadelphia, most people think it makes sense to point the finger at the one thing that runs through this community, its love of hip-hop. But the violent nature of some forms of hip-hop is a minuscule factor in black-on-black violence," and may not exist at all. So, why is this violence so prevalent in the African-American community?
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even after midnight, delegates and well-wishers waited in line to enter the VIP room at Jay-Z's cavernous and swanky sports bar, the 40/40 Club, to press flesh and get face time with Lt. Gov. Michael Steele of Maryland, a rising Republican star. Other GOP stalwarts showed up at the week's only event where hip-hop music played a central role - at least as the sound coming from the speakers - but no hip-hop luminaries were in sight. With the convention being held in the cradle of a hip-hop culture that has recently been pushing to get the nation's youth to become politically active, Republicans this week lived in a mostly hip-hop-free zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
It was written off as just a fad but, like Groove B Chill said, "ain't nothing like hip-hop music. " And now the multimillion-dollar sound can be heard everywhere. Here are some spots to check it out in the city: Saturday at La Tazza there's a record-release party for Department of Rec and Kenneth Masters that has attracted the skills of Low Budget, Kwestion and 103.9's Jay-Ski. Monday, get down with the underground at Fluid's "The Remedy" with Rich Medina and Cosmo. And Wednesday, step into Sugar Mom's for a listen to Seedwest and Shaun Abu. Or return to Fluid on Wednesday for a treat when Lord Finesse - not a misprint, the Parental Advisory rapper also DJs - spins a set.
NEWS
October 6, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
WYCLEF JEAN with special guests Melky Sedak, plus De La Soul and Black Eyed Peas, tomorrow at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue. Doors open at 2 p.m. Admission: $5 (plus service charge if purchased through Ticketmaster. At its best, music can be a first-rate educator and mind expander. So says Wyclef Jean, the world-class musician and "mad scientist" who'll be bringing his ear-opening, conscious brand of hip-hop to the students attending the MTV Campus Invasion/Philadelphia College Festival show at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts tomorrow afternoon.
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