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Hip Replacement

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SPORTS
November 19, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Paterno and two doctors agree that if Paterno has hip-replacement surgery the day after Saturday's regular-season finale, the Penn State football coach could recover in time for the Nittany Lions' likely Jan. 1 bowl game. "I'm going to be back," Paterno said yesterday during the weekly teleconference. "But how it's going to affect me? I don't have an MD after my name yet. Maybe when I retire I'll go back to medical school. " Two hip-replacement specialists, speaking in general medical terms, said Paterno likely would recover well.
SPORTS
March 11, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
More than 90 percent of hip-replacement surgeries succeed initially, but there is no guarantee an artificial hip will last indefinitely, according to the American Medical Association. But a New York orthopedic surgeon says Bo Jackson might be able to return to baseball as a designated hitter if he has modern surgery that does not rely on bone cement to hold a prosthesis in place. Jackson, the two-sport star who played football for the Los Angeles Raiders and baseball for the Chicago White Sox, decided yesterday to undergo hip- replacement surgery because irritation and inflammation of his hip joint have worsened since he was injured in January 1991 playing football.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
If Jennifer Childs, 43, traveled back in time, her destination would be vaudeville. The actress, playwright, director, and cofounder of 1812 Productions is a history-of-comedy "nerd" whose holiday shows are Philadelphia classics. Her troupe is named for 1812 Pine St., where Childs lived in 1998 when it began. This holiday's show is a fresh spin on 1812's staple, This Is the Week That Is. Pint-sized in every way but talent - "Trust me, I know more short jokes than you do" - Childs is a Lutheran pastor's daughter.
SPORTS
March 9, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Bo Jackson's agent said yesterday that hip-replacement surgery was among the options being considered, but that no course of medical treatment had been decided on for the hobbling designated hitter. "There's one thing that's an absolute certainty - that Bo will remain with the White Sox and continue to play baseball," the agent, Arn Tellem, said from Los Angeles. "The White Sox and Bo are looking for ways to preserve a long-term relationship. "The only thing ruled out is retirement.
NEWS
September 15, 2009 | By Inquirer Staff
Lower Merion police have lowered the boom on Bobby Rydell, the onetime teen idol whose 1969 Bentley wreaked a bit of havoc in Narberth last month. Rydell, 67, was charged with driving under the influence after tests determined his blood-alcohol level was more than double the legal limit when his car jumped a curb and swiped a decorative pole, shrubbery, and a landscape wall outside a yoga salon on Montgomery Avenue. No one was injured. Rydell told 6ABC the day after the accident that he had had a "couple of drinks at lunch.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She spends every day of every spring making fudge. Her license plate and kitchen apron scream: "Oh Fudge!!" And this month she met a career goal of five tons - five tons - of dark, decadent chocolate fudge. So it seems rather ironic that Margaret Schifter can't stand the stuff. "Don't like it - really never have," said Schifter, 78, as she stood splatter-free in her kitchen adding butter to yet another six-pound batch of brown gooey mush. Schifter, instead, feels obligated to fudge.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1992 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Lou Maguire, the last straw came in May, when he tried to walk from a distant parking lot to the Spectrum to watch a playoff game between the Philadelphia 76ers and the Chicago Bulls. Even with a cane, he could not ignore the agony in his hip. By the time he and his wife got to their seats, he was in tears. "I told my wife, 'I can't live this way,' " he said. And so it was that Maguire, 50, an educational researcher and one-time marathon runner from Churchville, Bucks County, entered an innovative program that physicians hope will mean fewer trips to the operating room - not to mention lower costs - for hip-replacement patients.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Ask a surgeon - especially a bone man - precisely what he does and it becomes apparent that he's mostly a craftsman, a mechanic. "Yes, I'm a carpenter, stone mason and plasterer with a medical degree," orthopedic surgeon Dr. Marvin E. Steinberg says with a laugh. Hammers, saws, high-speed drills, chisels and screwdrivers are all tools of the trade in the hip replacement game. So it should be no big surprise that when Steinberg had an idea for a new surgical instrument, he visited hardware stores searching for something similar.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1995 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, columnist Liz Smith, Inquirer music critic Dan DeLuca, USA Today and Reuters
Elizabeth Taylor's body still isn't working right. Beset by years of physical problems, she has a serious limp because of her second hip replacement. Liz is planning to have another operation next month. Taylor told her doctor that one of her legs is now shorter than the other, placing a strain on her back and first hip replacement. "I will not be a cripple," Taylor told columnist Liz Smith. "I will not use crutches or a walker. I will get over this and get on with my life.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Seneca Covington, 38, says that when she's driving, she often ignores a "Do Not Enter" street sign to save time near her home on Calumet Street near Cresson. So when a 66-year-old school-crossing guard tried to stop her from bucking traffic at the intersection on Oct. 26, 1994, she was upset. Covington's car struck the guard's right hand. Then Covington drove off, said Assistant District Attorney David Augenbraun. The guard continued working. A few minutes later, Covington, a mother of two, came back to complain that the guard, Mary Pickersgill, had deliberately hit the car. When Pickersgill began to take down Covington's license plate number, she was pushed to the ground, the prosecutor said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 28, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jillian Bernstein eats dinner with her parents in Haverford, the conversation runs to the kinds of topics you might expect with a ninth grader. You know, the tennis team, band practice . . . cost transparency for hospital procedures. Jillian Bernstein, you see, just had research published in a medical journal. "It's kind of the family business," said the daughter of a nurse and physician. But still - a published author at age 14? "Very, very unusual," said Robert Steinbrook, editor-at-large of the journal in question, JAMA Internal Medicine.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By David Sell and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steve Lorenz works as a foreman at a cement company near his home in Whitehall, Pa., and has been active all of his life, but that life has been different since he had both hips replaced. "Sitting with him, watching TV, he would drive me crazy because he is always moving," Pat Lorenz said of her husband's discomfort. "He often said it felt like he was sitting on marbles. " Pat Lorenz is scheduled to speak Wednesday at a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel hearing in suburban Washington.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012 | By Jenny Kuan, For The Inquirer
We hadn't had a vacation since my husband had a hip replacement in fall 2010. Everyone we know had been talking about cruise vacations, so we decided to follow the crowd. Cruise travel is perfect for senior citizens, especially a handicapped one. There's no need to trudge long and far, and it offers freedom from the chores at home. We went to a AAA travel agent and booked a trip in late September to New England/Canada on Caribbean Princess Cruise. It was quite exciting. The cruise was spacious, beautiful, and luxurious.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
If Jennifer Childs, 43, traveled back in time, her destination would be vaudeville. The actress, playwright, director, and cofounder of 1812 Productions is a history-of-comedy "nerd" whose holiday shows are Philadelphia classics. Her troupe is named for 1812 Pine St., where Childs lived in 1998 when it began. This holiday's show is a fresh spin on 1812's staple, This Is the Week That Is. Pint-sized in every way but talent - "Trust me, I know more short jokes than you do" - Childs is a Lutheran pastor's daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
Never can say goodbye to Regis. When the Philbin nut steps away from his frothy chat show in a few weeks, it will be with a viselike grip on the Guinness World Record for most hours logged on U.S. television. He's passed 70,000, and counting. And don't for a minute think that dropping Live! with Regis and Kelly means that he's retiring. What's he going to do? Sit at home with Joy all day? Get a grip, will ya? The man is only 80 years old, for Pete's sake. He's just catching his second wind.
NEWS
June 2, 2010 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thelma Causey walked out of the hospital Monday night, several hours after a ricocheting bullet struck her leg, without so much as a Tylenol from the doctors. She rode home in her own car, too, because she was afraid she would get charged for another ambulance ride. She stayed home Tuesday from her job checking in students at the West Philadelphia High School cafeteria, but she plans to go to work Wednesday "if my daughter don't raise too much Cain. " "Miss Thelma" is 86 years old, and being hit by a stray bullet doesn't appear to have slowed her one bit. Causey, watching television Monday night in her Kingsessing home, went outside for some fresh air during a commercial around 9:30 p.m. She saw a young man running across the street, but she never saw the gunman firing at him. "I heard, 'Pow!
NEWS
September 15, 2009 | By Inquirer Staff
Lower Merion police have lowered the boom on Bobby Rydell, the onetime teen idol whose 1969 Bentley wreaked a bit of havoc in Narberth last month. Rydell, 67, was charged with driving under the influence after tests determined his blood-alcohol level was more than double the legal limit when his car jumped a curb and swiped a decorative pole, shrubbery, and a landscape wall outside a yoga salon on Montgomery Avenue. No one was injured. Rydell told 6ABC the day after the accident that he had had a "couple of drinks at lunch.
SPORTS
November 19, 2008 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Paterno and two doctors agree that if Paterno has hip-replacement surgery the day after Saturday's regular-season finale, the Penn State football coach could recover in time for the Nittany Lions' likely Jan. 1 bowl game. "I'm going to be back," Paterno said yesterday during the weekly teleconference. "But how it's going to affect me? I don't have an MD after my name yet. Maybe when I retire I'll go back to medical school. " Two hip-replacement specialists, speaking in general medical terms, said Paterno likely would recover well.
NEWS
June 30, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last of two parts. Fed up with the constant pain in her hips, Katrina McKenzie took her surgeon's advice and had them replaced with experimental implants. The 31-year-old from Galloway, N.J., who agreed to participate in a clinical study, knew there was a risk that her new hips could fail. But she didn't know that the manufacturer financing the study, Smith & Nephew, was also paying her surgeon tens of thousands of dollars a year as a consultant. In recent years, such payments to doctors from medical implant manufacturers and drug companies have become increasingly controversial.
NEWS
June 30, 2008 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fed up with the constant pain in her hips, Katrina McKenzie took her surgeon's advice and had them replaced with experimental implants. The 31-year-old from Galloway, N.J., who agreed to participate in a clinical study, knew there was a risk that her new hips could fail. But she didn't know that the manufacturer financing the study, Smith & Nephew, was also paying her surgeon tens of thousands of dollars a year as a consultant. In recent years, such payments to doctors from medical implant manufacturers and drug companies have become increasingly controversial.
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