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Hiroshima

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NEWS
May 16, 1988 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
As President Reagan prepared for a fourth summit with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel yesterday called for yet another meeting between the two world leaders. This one would be held in Hiroshima, to address the nuclear holocaust that devoured the Japanese city Aug. 6, 1945, when the United States dropped the bomb that effectively ended World War II. Speaking at 125th commencement exercises for La Salle University, at the Civic Center, Wiesel, a survivor of the World War II death camp at Auschwitz, called on the President to meet with Gorbachev in Hiroshima, where nuclear war is more than just the subject of arms-control talks.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
With determination in her eyes, peace activist Beth Centz draped the multicolored ribbon across the main entrance to General Electric's Re-entry Systems facility at 32d and Chestnut Streets yesterday, then continued along the front wall on her way to wrapping the entire building with ribbon. With scissors in his hands, a security guard deftly clipped only that part of the ribbon that blocked the steps, then hustled down the sidewalk with the newly severed strand and handed it back to Centz.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
RE THE photos and stories on the possible invasion of Iraq (Feb. 26): The picture of the nuclear bomb blast and the inference that Iraq is the next Hiroshima was upsetting. Whatever happens regarding Iraq and Saddam, I like to believe that a nuclear bomb would never be one of the solutions. President Bush and his Cabinet have never alluded to this as a solution. We Americans remember the pain and horror that the bomb brought about, and the situation we are faced with now is in now way like World War II. The people of Iraq deserve our help in freeing them from their oppressive regime, not murder and destruction because of their leader.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By MARTIN HARWIT
We lack a national consensus on what to say about Hiroshima and Nagasaki - the two Japanese cities on which the United States dropped atomic bombs 49 years ago. Next August, on the 50th anniversary, Americans will commemorate these pivotal events, but how? Two divergent but widely held views define our dilemma. One view sprang up as soon as the bombs exploded and the war ended. Its proponents are united on the many details that need to be included in their story. Properly told, it appeals to our national self-image.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Shohei Imamura's eloquent and deeply moving Black Rain is built on the argument that - in the case of a nuclear holocaust - there might be a fate worse than death. The tragedy of survival. It is a tragedy that can assume many forms. After Hiroshima is incinerated in a searing flash of light on Aug. 6, 1945, a little boy staggers through the ruins. He is burned beyond recognition - so far beyond recognition that his older brother doesn't know him when they lurch into one another.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
T HESE ARE THE remarks I would like to hear from President Obama when he visits Hiroshima on Friday:   We gather in this place draped in death and sorrow to respectfully remember those who perished here almost 70 years ago. Speaking for the United States, we have regrets. We regret that, 75 years ago this December, Japan killed more than 2,400 Americans in an unprovoked attack against the United States in Hawaii. That's my home. I regret that the United States was pushed into a war we did not seek and for which we were militarily unprepared.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
When a TV movie confronts the issue of the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima, and does it from the Japanese point of view, it should be pretty compelling television. It's unfortunate to report that "Hiroshima: Out of the Ashes" isn't, because its producers clearly made such an earnest effort. The new made-for-television movie, which airs at 9 tonight on Channel 3, takes the politically correct stance on the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing and the devastation that followed. The theme: It was a horrible thing; innocent thousands died and suffered; we should all work to ensure it never happens again.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By David Corn
The atomic flash at Hiroshima that killed tens of thousands of Japanese civilians began a process that has claimed the health and lives of tens of thousands of citizens of the United States. Hiroshima ushered in the atomic age. Nuclear warfare, no matter how ghastly, was now a legitimate, justifiable enterprise. Weapons were developed, tested and built, and at the core of each bomb was some of the most lethal material that exists on the planet. To meet this need, the United States constructed a nuclear infrastructure that has extracted its own toll in the five decades since Hiroshima's flash.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was August of 1945, and although Marty Zapf could not swim, he jumped from the burning plane anyway, splashing into the calm waters of the Sea of Japan. Zapf was an Army Air Corps radioman for a B-29 that had just finished bombing the steel mills in the city of Yawata. But after banking out and heading back, the plane's right wing was hit by anti-aircraft flak and the fire grew. As Zapf bobbed and floated in his one-man raft with his comrades scattered about him, the 19-year-old had no idea the city of Hiroshima had been leveled by a big bomb called Little Boy. That a firestorm erupted in a searing white heat, instantly devouring an estimated 100,000 people.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By PETER D. ZIMMERMAN
Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we are told, balanced the moral scales for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. That argument is simplistic and wrong. Even if one sets aside the rape of Nanking, the concentration camps at Singapore and the Bataan death march, the scales are out of balance. American use of nuclear weapons to end the war in the Pacific would balance Pearl Harbor only if Japanese hands were not also contaminated by atomic arms. Right up until the day of surrender, Japan had an active nuclear-weapons development program, one that is amply documented but conveniently overlooked, allowing the Japanese to paint themselves as the innocent first atomic victims.
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NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
T HESE ARE THE remarks I would like to hear from President Obama when he visits Hiroshima on Friday:   We gather in this place draped in death and sorrow to respectfully remember those who perished here almost 70 years ago. Speaking for the United States, we have regrets. We regret that, 75 years ago this December, Japan killed more than 2,400 Americans in an unprovoked attack against the United States in Hawaii. That's my home. I regret that the United States was pushed into a war we did not seek and for which we were militarily unprepared.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Lower the nuclear threat I welcome President Obama's decision to be the first sitting U.S. president in the nuclear age to visit Hiroshima, the site of the first use of nuclear weapons ("Obama to make history with visit to Hiroshima," Wednesday). Remembering the horror and destruction wreaked by a relatively small nuclear weapon compared with today's nuclear weapons is crucial to generating the global will to move toward abolishing such weapons worldwide. The last nuclear reduction treaty was in 2010, between the United States and Russia.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA At ground zero, plot the end of nukes President Obama's visit to Japan will show how far we've come since World War II ("Obama to make history with visit to Hiroshima," Wednesday). Japan is the leading U.S. ally in East Asia. The visit will provide an opportunity to begin to chart the future beyond nuclear weapons. Just as the United States was first to develop nuclear arms, we should take the lead toward a world free of this menace. Obama has reduced the nuclear threat with the START deal with Russia, cutting weapons equally, and the Iran deal, removing most of that country's uranium fuel.
TRAVEL
August 3, 2015 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
HIROSHIMA, Japan - At 8:15 a.m. local time, on Thursday, Aug. 6, 1945, Little Boy exploded above that country's 10th-largest city, flattening it with the force of 15,000 tons of TNT. So dawned Day One of the Nuclear Age. Coming up on the 70th anniversary, we stood as tourists in Hiroshima, my wife and I, just yards from ground zero for the first atomic bomb - one of two ever to be used in warfare, with the second dropped three days later on Nagasaki....
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Enid Lynne Shivers, 73, of Germantown, a college teacher, nonviolence trainer, and prolific writer, died Tuesday, Feb. 3, of a heart ailment at Wyndmoor Hills Health Care & Rehab Center. Known informally as Lynne, Ms. Shivers was an idealist and lifelong Quaker who put her words and pacifist values to work as an instructor in nonviolent passive resistance. While teaching English at Community College of Philadelphia, she led training sessions on nonviolent protest in various countries.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Rubby Sherr, 99, a Princeton University physics professor who helped develop the atomic bomb and witnessed its first test, died Monday, July 8, at the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, where he lived since 1998. The test took place near Alamogordo, N.M., on July 16, 1945. The United States dropped the first atomic bomb in wartime, over Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. "His major contribution," son-in-law Robert Hess said, was "the portion of the device positioned at the center of the bomb, designed to spread the nuclear chain reaction rapidly throughout the fissile plutonium material.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Wayne Miller, 94, a photographer who captured some of the first images of the destruction of Hiroshima, Japan, after it was struck by an atomic bomb during World War II and who created an indelible photograph of the birth of his son, died Wednesday at his home in Orinda, Calif. Mr. Miller had more than 100 assignments for Life magazine, when it was a leading showcase of photography, and in the 1940s took a memorable series of images of African American life in Chicago. In 1955, he helped assemble one of the most monumental photographic exhibitions of the era, "The Family of Man," which was curated by his mentor, Edward Steichen, one of the most prominent photographers of the early 20th century.
NEWS
April 27, 2013
George Bunn, 87, a leading figure in the field of arms control who helped draft and negotiate the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons worldwide, died April 21 at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He had spinal cancer, said his son Matthew Bunn. In 1945, while serving in the Navy, Mr. Bunn was on a ship bound for Japan when atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki brought an end to World War II. "He was convinced that the atomic bomb saved his life," his son said Thursday.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Norman Mayor, 91, of Dresher, a chemist and World War II veteran who helped the U.S. military build the atomic bomb, died Friday of natural causes. Mr. Mayor was drafted into the Army in 1944, thinking he was going to be sent to Bellingham, Wash., and eventually to the Pacific Theater, his daughter Alisa Mayor said Sunday. Instead, after completing training in Texas, he and a group of other chemists were told to report to Knoxville, Tenn. "Then they were told to wait on a certain corner and a certain street," Alisa Mayor said.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
By K.C. Cole August is a great month for celebrating human stupidity. On Aug. 6, 1945, we all but disappeared Hiroshima with a single atomic bomb, and then did it again, three days later, at Nagasaki. And now we barely seem to care. The sad truth is that we are incapable of understanding exactly what these seemingly ancient events mean - right now, for all of us, today. The August anniversaries are a stark reminder that the brains we inherited from our ancestors simply may not be up to dealing with much of the modern world we (they)
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