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Hispanics

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NEWS
April 30, 1990 | By Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writer
Go to the filthy, decrepit parts of North Philadelphia in which most of the city's Hispanic population lives. Listen to their anger, listen to their frustration, listen to their fears. They say they complain again and again about living with trash, rats, drugs, crime, police harassment, decaying housing, ethnic hatred. But nobody helps, they say. Nobody listens, nobody cares. "There is a lack of faith in government institutions, generally speaking," said Israel Colon, assistant to City Councilman Angel Ortiz.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
Was Roberto Clemente Hispanic? Was he black? How about Jose Canseco? Or Fernando Valenzuela? Clemente was both Hispanic and black - Puerto Rican, to be specific. Valenzuela, who is Mexican, is also Hispanic; he is a mestizo. And Canseco, a white Cuban, is a Hispanic too. Defining who is what race can sometimes be clear cut and unambiguous. In other cases it can be a prickly, inexact matter. But one thing is clear: a Hispanic can be of any race. Yet that's something this country is completely confused about.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By John Woestendiek, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Presente el pase al oficial de la entrada. " "Remueva todo articulo de sus bolsillas. " "Proceda por el detector de metal. " The stenciled signs hang above the entry gate to Graterford Prison, and when you do what they say - present your pass to the gate officer, remove all articles from your pockets, and proceed through the metal detector - you can see that Graterford, like prisons and jails across the country, is not as black and...
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | BY HERNAN GUARACAO
Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, Roman Catholic archbishop of Philadelphia, couldn't remain silent anymore. The spiritual leader of a great portion of Christians in one of the most segregated cities in the United States finally decided to speak out, taking a necessary stand on the issue of racism. The cardinal branded racism as "a moral disease, highly contagious," whose "carriers infect others in countless ways through words and attitudes, deeds and omissions . . . "It operates silently," he added in a pastoral letter, "in strategies of self-interest and structured in patterns of discrimination.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
While looking for a movie at a video store the other day, I heard the man behind the counter slowly raise his voice in anger as he spoke on the telephone. "No, no, not here . . . maybe at our second store. It isn't here, ma'am . . . the other store is closed now . . . closed. No, ma'am . . . No! . . . closed. It is closed. " A pause. "Your VCR is being fixed at our other store, and it's closed. Goodbye. " I watched from across the aisle, standing by a tape rack as the man hung up the phone.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | By Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
Black and Hispanic students are being held back at a greater rate than white and Asian students, according to Board of Education statistics released yesterday. The new data show that four of five students from first to eighth grade were promoted last June - the city's highest promotion rate in five years. But the disparity among racial groups has school officials and community leaders concerned. Asian students had the highest promotion rate (89 percent), followed by whites (86 percent)
BUSINESS
July 14, 1995 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
They say some things don't change, but pharmacist Fred Gold means much more to the so-called "Golden Block" than that tired cliche. Thirty years have brought wholesale change to the Hispanic business district and surrounding neighborhood, but Gold has stood his ground, managing the same Cambria Pharmacies Inc. store at 2860 N. 5th St. throughout that time. Gold, 62, will be honored Tuesday by the Fifth Street Business Association for standing by the neighborhood through change that has not always been kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Ruben Blades, salsa singer and star of Crossover Dreams, now filming The Milagro Beanfield War here, regards this film as a crossover dream realized. "It's such a pleasure to be part of a movie that doesn't go for cheap laughs or ethnic stereotypes," says Blades about Milagro, the first big- budget Hollywood film to focus on the political conflict between Anglos and Chicanos. He plays Milagro's sheriff, Bernabe Montoya. "Typically, I get scripts where they want me to play Paco, the baddest drug dealer in Miami's Little Havana.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As a new American citizen, Jose Moreno knows he has to improve his English and get more training to fulfill his dream of a secure job with good benefits. But to study, Moreno would have to cut back his hours as a parking attendant. And he and his wife support a family of six, including three children newly arrived from their native El Salvador. "I'm a little stuck," said Moreno, 46, who lives in suburban Washington. This month's census reports on income and poverty paint a picture of a Latino population in an economic bind, much as Jose Moreno is. The figures show that Latinos lag further behind whites than in previous decades, and by some measures, they trail African Americans.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge has signed an order formalizing an agreement under which the city will pay $45,000 to a group of Hispanic citizens who were rounded up by police after the slaying of a Philadelphia policeman in May. U.S. District Judge Clarence J. Newcomer signed the order by which the city will pay $548.78 to each of the 82 Hispanics who joined in a suit filed against the city by the community group, Spring Garden United Neighbors. The civil rights suit, filed June 6, contended that Hispanics were "detained, questioned, threatened, coerced, arrested and assaulted" by police after the killing of Officer Thomas Trench.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 30, 2014
REMEMBER the last mayor's race, the unforgettable thumping of momentary Republican candidate Karen Brown by incumbent Democrat Michael Nutter? Oh? You forgot. How about 2007, when unknown (millionaire) Tom Knox finished just behind Nutter in the Democratic primary (which picks the mayor because the GOP hasn't won a mayor's race since Jim Gardner was in diapers). That cast of characters also included (in descending vote count) U.S. Reps. Bob Brady and Chaka Fattah and state Rep. Dwight Evans.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
ISSUE | ELECTIONS And they're off Why are the media so obsessed with treating elections as horse races ("Election primer," Aug. 31)? One would think the only thing that mattered was identifying the winner in order to win a bet. Despite a subtitle promising "a look at many of the issues" in the Pennsylvania governor's race, an Inquirer article only reminded me that Gov. Corbett was behind in the polls and hence behind in money-raising. I knew not one whit more about what challenger Tom Wolf is likely to do in office and only a little more of what Corbett has done.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
KENNETT SQUARE The Cinco de Mayo festival in Kennett Square started in a parking lot. Behind the library, a few representatives from local nonprofits sat at tables and pushed their good causes to the few hundred who showed up. On Sunday, 13 years later, at least 15,000 are expected to crowd the Chester County borough for this year's festivities, now held on Kennett Square's main street. The festival, which commemorates the Mexican army's victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, has become a streetscape of colorful costumes, foods, and music, and it is in the throes of a transition, just like the group that organizes it. The members of Casa de las Culturas (House of Cultures)
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IT'S BEEN JUST over a year since Vineland, N.J.'s first Hispanic mayor took the oath, and for some in the sprawling Cumberland County community, that's long enough. Ruben Bermudez, a former City Council member and owner of a formal-wear store in town, upset Vineland's incumbent mayor in a runoff election on Dec. 18, 2012, with his "Moving Forward" slate. But a recall petition is seeking to oust him amid accusations of cronyism, a closed-door atmosphere and flat-out incompetence. "Vineland's not moving forward at all. It's actually gone backward," said Tami Harold, one of the five organizers of the Committee to Recall Mayor Ruben Bermudez.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Music blared at the edge of the Delaware on Saturday as thousands of people swayed and salsa'ed during the 32d annual Hispanic Fiesta at Penn's Landing. There were foods and paraphernalia galore for sale, from arepa flatbreads to empanadas and shorts emblazoned with Puerto Rican flags. Music emanated from the waterfront stage as people sipped piƱa coladas from pineapples and sucked down limber de cocos - a kind of coconut popsicle - to try to stay cool in the heat. Concilio, the nonprofit council of Spanish-speaking organizations that organized the event, said it was expecting 30,000 people to attend the two-day celebration, with a popular Hispanic music act set to perform each night: Tony Tun Tun on Saturday and Tony Vega on Sunday.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S.-born children of Hispanic immigrants are more likely than their parents to identify themselves as Democrats as they integrate into American life, maintaining strong ties to their cultural heritage while casting themselves as liberal on social issues. A wide-ranging study released Thursday by the Pew Research Center lays bare some of the difficulties for the Republican Party following elections in November, when President Obama won with support from 80 percent of nonwhite and ethnic voters.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Juliet Williams and Elliot Spagat, Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Hispanics will become the largest ethnic group in the nation's most populous state early next year, the California Department of Finance said Thursday, marking a milestone in a long-running demographic shift that has already altered the political balance of power, the economy, and culture. The prediction that Hispanics will equal the number of whites in California by the middle of this year and surpass them in early 2014 was disclosed in Gov. Jerry Brown's budget proposal in early January, but the latest numbers offer a more detailed portrait of how the shift will unfold across age groups and geographic regions over the next five decades.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. - Hispanics will become the largest ethnic group in the nation's most populous state early next year, the California Department of Finance said Thursday. The prediction that Hispanics will equal the number of whites in California by the middle of this year and surpass them in early 2014 was disclosed in Gov. Jerry Brown's budget proposal in early January. Whites and Hispanics each now represent 39 percent of the state's population. In 2020, Hispanics are estimated to account for 40.7 percent of the population, and whites will make up 36.6 percent.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
I HAND THE newsstand guy $10 for a pack of gum a couple of weeks ago, and he says, "Want to play the Powerball? It's over $500 million. " I never buy lottery tickets. I don't understand what "box it" means, let alone the side games. I don't have a series of "lucky numbers," except the nine numbers on my Social Security check. That's my personal lottery, and I "win" every month. When friends play the Powerball, I tell them, "My chances of winning are the same as yours, and I didn't even buy a ticket.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - New census data released Thursday affirm a clear and sustained drop in illegal immigration, ending more than a decade of increases. The number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. dropped to an estimated 11.1 million last year from a peak of 12 million in 2007, part of an overall waning of Hispanic immigration. For the first time since 1910, Hispanic immigration last year was topped by immigrants from Asia. Demographers say that illegal Hispanic immigration - 80 percent of all illegal immigration comes from Mexico and Latin America - isn't likely to approach its mid-2000 peak again, due in part to a weakened U.S. economy and stronger enforcement, but also because of a graying of the Mexican population.
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