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Historic House

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NEWS
February 8, 2005 | By Barbara Silberman
In 1858, an intrepid band of ladies, led by Ann Pamela Cunningham, bought George Washington's home, Mount Vernon. It was a defining event in America's historic-preservation movement. Unfortunately, 150 years later, saving historic properties by converting them into historic house museums still is the most common method of preservation. Today, virtually any house that is more than 50 years old may be eligible for preservation. Often the oldest home in a township, or the home of a prominent citizen is preserved as a house museum.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
To win approval to build townhouses on a site in the Haverford section of Lower Merion Township, a developer has agreed to move a historic, three-story house on the property, officials said Monday. The township commissioners' Building and Planning Committee approved a plan for seven housing units on the site at the intersection of Booth Lane and Lancaster Avenue. The plan will require the developer to move the late 19th- century house 50 to 70 feet to the front of the one-third-acre lot. According to township planning director Charles L. Guttenplan, the house is owned by the estate of John T. Mahoney of Bryn Mawr, who died recently.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A historic house on State Road that was to be demolished yesterday has won a reprieve of at least two weeks through the intervention of three local political leaders. About 8:15 a.m., a demolition crew hired by developer Claude de Botton started to tear down the garage at 421 N. State Rd., with plans to demolish the adjacent house, as well. De Botton purchased the 2.6-acre property and the buildings on it for $695,000 in January from Charles P. Sexton Jr., Springfield Republican chairman, aiming to combine it with an adjacent, undeveloped 64-acre parcel he already owns.
NEWS
August 15, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first surprise came in February, as they inspected the stucco on a Haddonfield house before repainting it. They removed pieces around the windows and discovered beautifully preserved red brick. Over the next few months, Mark Welsh and his son Ted knocked off 10 tons of stucco, revealing a side of a historic house that hadn't been seen for centuries. Out of its shell emerged the stately home of Thomas Redman, a prominent Quaker businessman who settled in town in the 1730s and owned a portion of the colonial-era building that houses the Indian King Tavern.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last 222 years, this solemn stone house in Germantown has been a private home, a meeting place, a witness to war and a refuge for slaves. For such a legacy, and for its broad gables and eaves, the historic Johnson House - on the corner of Germantown Avenue and Washington Lane - is cherished by many in this extraordinary mosaic of a neighborhood. But lately, neighbors are complaining that while the inside of the Johnson House is treated with the care and reverence it deserves, the outside is literally going to seed.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
A glass-enclosed porch sweeps around the first floor of the stone house at the northwest corner of Woodbine and Narberth Avenues. Another open porch is cut out of the shingled gable roof on the second floor, and above it, a dormer window is set into another level of sloping, shingled rooftop. The house, which was built in 1908 by David Knickerbacker Boyd, a major architect at the turn of the century, has fallen into disrepair over the years, but members of a newly formed historic preservation committee say they believe the house, which was built for Dr. O.J. Snyder, can be restored to its previous glory.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the new tenants who signed a lease to rent a historic house owned by Upper Darby Township had a rude awakening when she visited the 200-year-old house this week. Vandals had visited the two-story Hill House sometime Monday and ripped up nearly one-quarter of the wooden roof. "They had to have a crowbar," said tenant Marie Steele. Steele, and her fiance, Joseph Romanelli, took possession of the house Aug. 19 after a 9-0 vote by the Upper Darby Council to approve the lease.
NEWS
January 10, 1999 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The screens on the back porch of the historic Jaggard House are torn and waft in the wind that blows over the 18th hole of the adjacent Indian Spring Golf Course. Inside, the wallpaper peels off layer by layer, as do the chips of paint that cling to the low, beamed ceiling. There are cracks in the masonry, and the woodwork that frames the rooms is damaged by more than two centuries of exposure to moisture. But the house will soon be getting a face-lift. The township is preparing to preserve it with a $400,000 bond that will transform it into the new home for the Center for the Arts, which will use the space for a gallery and art studio.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
A fund-raising drive is being planned in Collingswood to refurbish the historic Collings-Knight House, which has been closed since the summer of 1988 because of potentially unsafe conditions. "The kitchen floor is sagging, and the chimney is leaning," said Arlene Smith, chairwoman of the Collings-Knight House Committee, a nonprofit group that administers the borough-owned house. "These things need to be fixed before we can open it again. " An architectural expert visited the house last year, Smith said, and estimated that the major repairs, as well as other necessary refurbishments, including painting, plastering and a new roof, would cost about $250,000.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Residents protesting the threatened demolition of a historic building in Phoenixville have won reprieve. Emotional pleas from architects and historic preservationists preceded the Borough Council's 8-3 vote Tuesday night to put a hold on the demolition application submitted by St. Ann's Church for the McCallum House on Main Street. "The largest number of historic buildings are right here in Phoenixville," said Barbara Cohen, an architect, pointing to a map of the immediate area.
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NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Like a Colonial-era militia, an assortment of people wearing a hodgepodge of uniforms marched through the heart of Bellmawr on July 4 carrying a "Save the Historic Hugg-Harrison House" banner. The borough's annual Independence Day parade along Browning Road took this earnest band of history lovers past the 18th-century structure, which played a noteworthy role in the Revolutionary War - but may nevertheless be torn down for the I-295 and Route 42 Direct Connection project. "Our point is not to be against the freeway.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Tricia Thurm describes it as "a midlife crisis. " Seriously, husband Arthur says, buying an 1841 fieldstone manor house in Upper Makefield nine years ago from the Heritage Conservancy in Doylestown satisfied a need "for a little more green space" and "room for the dogs. " The Thurms traded a house they built in Cherry Hill and lived in for 25 years for a long-vacant dwelling that needed work. They restored the exterior, redid the kitchen with high-end touches nine years ago, and carved a wine cellar from a well house.
REAL_ESTATE
June 14, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Don Rossi wanted country living with easy access to major roads. His wife, Marian Rossi, wanted a historic house. It was 1991, and the couple, recently married, were relocating to the Philadelphia area from upstate Pennsylvania for Don's job. So, the two spread out a map, pinned the most desirable areas, and happily settled on what they've christened Terra Sanctum, a circa 19th-century house nestled on a wooded wonderland in Exton. The one-acre property was once part of a larger tract owned by William Penn.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pastor assured the crowd that his congregation wanted the same things as the residents who are worried about a plan to build a new church in the Hatfield Township neighborhood. "You want open space. We want open space. You want walking trails, we want walking trails," John Cope, pastor of Keystone Fellowship in Montgomeryville, told the standing-room-only audience at the township building. "Softball fields, baseball fields. We want that. " But many neighbors don't want an expansive new building - church or otherwise - in the middle of it all. That difference of opinion is at the core of the church's effort to change the zoning on a 43-acre property it owns, known as the Bishop Tract, to let it build a 75,000-square-foot facility on Orvilla Road.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
L AURA BLAU, 59, of Bella Vista, is principal of BluPath Design, an architecture-and-design firm she co-founded with her husband, Paul Thompson, in 2003. The firm specializes in designing simple, elegant and sustainable spaces. The granddaughter of a prominent Connecticut builder and architect, Blau was a painter and sculptor before she became an architect herself in 1995. Q: What distinguishes your design method from others? A: I try not to dictate design to clients.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2013 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Looking at the 19-century redbrick house in Washington Square West, you may wonder why it took 20 years to renovate a 932-square-foot space. When you hear that every detail had to be a compromise between two married housing architects - the ones who live there - then it becomes immediately clear. "Ever since we bought the house in 1994, we looked at it as a mock-up, a chance to try out different ideas before they were built and [to] perfect our profession," said Anthony Miksitz, who heads his own architectural firm.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
Samuel Powel was nicknamed the "Patriot Mayor," but was he? Powel has the distinction of being the last mayor of Philadelphia under British rule and the first after American independence, but new research is calling into question his early commitment to the cause. Samuel Powel, born in 1738, was a lifelong Philadelphian. In 1759, he graduated from the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), inherited his grandfather's Philadelphia properties (making him one of the wealthiest young men in the colonies)
REAL_ESTATE
December 16, 2012 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
It's a perfect place for celebrating the holidays, which is one of the reasons Stacey and AJ Jordan love their Moorestown home. It's no wonder that the house, which was featured on the 50th anniversary Cooks Tour this month, was the inspiration for Thornton Wilder's play, Our Town , after the Pulitzer Prize-winning author stood as best man at his older brother Amos' wedding there in 1935. Throughout the years, the dwelling, built in 1923, has kept its original splendor, while also gaining contemporary and stylish elements to suit a modern, active family.
NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission, concerned about a potential collapse, Friday approved demolition and reconstruction of the crumbling east side of the Spring Garden house once owned by abolitionist Robert Purvis. Last month, a commission panel recommended denial of the project, arguing that the developer's plans were vague and that the engineering drawings were out of date. Preservationists attending that hearing also expressed concerns about the owner's financial resources. The developer, Miguel Santiago, whose family has owned the corner rowhouse at 1601 Mount Vernon St. since the 1970s, insisted he had the financing to proceed.
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