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Historic Sites

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NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By Theresa Sullivan Barger, Special to The Inquirer
In anticipation of a bill that is expected to go before the state House of Representatives in September, the Springfield Planning Commission, together with local historians, plans to work on an ordinance designed to preserve historic buildings. At a commission meeting Tuesday night, four of the nine members heard a proposal by Marie Kitto of the Springfield Historical Society to draft an ordinance to protect individual historic sites. House Bill 1308, which Kitto urged the commission to support, would allow municipalities to designate specific landmarks as historic under state guidelines, she said.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
A housing development and an office park, both on historic sites, have been proposed in West Whiteland. During the Planning Commission's meeting Wednesday, Blair & Son of Bryn Mawr submitted a sketch plan for a 170,000-square-foot industrial park on the site of the Thomas Marble Quarry, which was built in 1833 and supplied marble used in such buildings as Girard College in Philadelphia. The commission made several suggestions for the industrial park proposed for the northeast section of Whitford and National Roads, which would include warehouse space and light-industrial firms such as a painting contractor.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Josephine Hull spends Wednesday afternoons in a one-room schoolhouse that was built in 1759. She sits in a corner by the front window, leafing through the faded pages of an 18th-century almanac or arranging stacks of souvenir postcards. It is a lonely job. "Some weeks it's so slow, I could practically fall asleep here," Hull said. "If we get five or six people in here, we're doing pretty good. " On this particular day, a half-dozen people had come to tour the Old School House in Mount Holly before Hull closed its door, ending her three-hour volunteer shift and the site's weekly visiting hours.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | BY WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
Philadelphia is a city with a past. But the ability to preserve its distinguished history in bricks and mortar is being threatened by insufficient funds, insensitive public policy and the quest for modernization. Earlier this summer, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the country's largest preservation organization, placed Independence Hall on the 1991 list of "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. " Together with the other sites that comprise America's most historic square-mile, the birthplace of our nation is in disrepair.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Visit historic sites decorated for the holidays during Candlelight Christmas in Chadds Ford, from 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday at locations in the Brandywine area. Three historic farmhouses in East Marlborough Township will be open for this self-guided tour: the Job and Abigail Peirce House, a Quaker homestead built in 1830, at 733 Beversrede Trail; the Inn at Folly Hill Vineyard, an 1837 home at 700 Folly Hill Rd.; and Fox Quarry Farm, a 20th-century house built on an 80-acre farm at 640 N. Walnut Rd. Visitors can also stop in at the Barns-Brinton House, an 18th-century tavern and home on Route 1 in Chadds Ford, where costumed interpreters will prepare colonial fare, and the Brandywine Battlefield Park Visitor Center, also on Route 1, where a 1777 Christmas will be re-created with festivities and refreshments.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Philadelphia was the cradle of liberty, you could say that Albany was where the infant United States first showed it could stand on its own. In the fall of 1777, British Gen. John "Gentleman Johnny" Burgoyne had a date for Christmas dinner in Albany. But coming down from the north with an army whose mission was to seize control of the vital Hudson River and thus split the colonies in half, Burgoyne ran into a patriot roadblock at Saratoga, just north of here. The American victory at Saratoga, which forced Burgoyne and his army to surrender, convinced the French to throw in with the colonists.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two prominent Bucks County historic sites will soon be able to renovate and expand their buildings, collections and programs thanks to $3.8 million in state funds. At a news conference at the foot of the steps of Pennsbury Manor, the summer home William Penn built in 1683, Lt. Gov. Mark Schweiker looked out onto the Delaware River and, on behalf of Gov. Ridge, announced a $3 million grant to Pennsbury Manor and a $785,000 grant to Washington Crossing Historic Park in Upper Makefield.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Revolutionary War hero didn't get paid for his efforts, he moved into a boarding house on Pine Street and tried to get the federal government to loosen its purse strings. That boarding house - now the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial at 3rd and Pine streets - has been closed since Jan. 1. You guessed it. More than 200 years later, again there were no federal funds for Kosciuszko. The boarding house was one of seven historic buildings that were closed to more than 49,800 tourists who have visited Independence National Historical Park since January.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Sharon Hill's centennial celebration is coming to a close, but borough officials will carry on one important activity with history in mind: the establishment of historic districts. Last month, the Borough Council passed an ordinance to form a five-member historical commission that will investigate and identify properties that might be considered historic. The commission also will coordinate applications for state and federal funding for the properties. Borough secretary Mildred Enderle said the commission would be made up of one council member, a real estate agent, a borough Planning Commission member, an architect and a resident.
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NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Staff Writer
The lost 19th-century graveyard established by Richard Allen, founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and utilized heavily by the city's black community until shortly after the Civil War, has been named a National Historic Site by the federal government. The existence of the graveyard had been forgotten until rediscovered by a historian a few years ago and designated a city landmark in 2013. Bethel Burying Ground now joins a handful of city graveyards - Christ Church Burial Ground, Old Swedes' Church Cemetery, Mikveh Israel Cemetery, the Woodlands - on the national register.
NEWS
December 23, 2015
CHESTER COUNTY Historic site to be preserved A historic 553-acre swath of land in Chester County will be preserved after a yearlong project to keep it from development. The Warwick Furnace Farm, along the French Creek in Warwick and East Nantmeal Townships, will be turned into a nature preserve and conserved through a joint effort involving the French and Pickering Creeks Conservation Trust. "It's hard to overstate the value of this property and its preservation," Cary Leptuck, French and Pickering board president, said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As the clock tower at Independence Hall struck 3 on a Thursday afternoon, Continental Army trooper Robert Hare stood next door in Signer's Garden, enlisting volunteers for the impending Revolution. The new soldiers, some missing front teeth, others waving flags taller than they were, headed down Fifth Street to the beat of Hare's drum. Historic Philadelphia's twice-a-day reenactment of a military muster is just a small part of its successful Once Upon a Nation program, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this summer.
TRAVEL
February 16, 2015 | By Philippa J. Chaplin, Inquirer Travel Editor
A travel guide should be easily organized, so readers can quickly find what they're looking for. It should be written in a friendly tone, and provide background and supplemental information that might not be readily available at historic sites. And it should offer guidance on where to turn for present-day comforts. A new book by Larissa and Michael Milne - Philadelphia Liberty Trail: Trace the Path of America's Heritage - does all of that. The authors' names might sound familiar.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  With their collars up against the cold, about 25 people, including new immigrants, trooped behind a colorful guide on Independence Mall Friday. "Philadelphia is ground zero for the making of America. Many answers to the U.S. citizenship test can be found right here," said Ed Mauger, stopping at the nation's first executive mansion, where he quizzed the group on the length of a U.S. presidential term and asked for another way to describe George Washington. "Four years. . . . The founding father," piped up Elizabeth Wang, 24, who was born in China and who came to the city for post-graduate study at the University of Pennsylvania law school.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marine Capt. Jason Dequenne came running down the sidewalk Wednesday toward the site of Tun Tavern in Old City. Barely out of breath, he slowed to a stop on the spot where the Marine Corps was founded in 1775. But he wasn't just out for a jog, and it was no coincidence he was on South Front Street. The Marine Corps turns 239 on Monday, and Dequenne, 41, is honoring its birthday by running 239 miles on a two-week-long journey from Washington to New York. On Wednesday, he ran through Philadelphia, bringing his mileage to 174.2.
NEWS
April 15, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In their last desperate moments, with winds howling and waves crashing around them, crew members rushed below decks and frantically pushed blankets and bedding into the leaking hull. They hoped to keep the steamer Robert J. Walker afloat long enough to make land near Absecon Inlet Light, but were overwhelmed by the rushing waters of the Atlantic in 1860. More than a century and a half later, the Walker is still pointed toward the lighthouse and the blue wool blankets the crew used are still lying in the bow, in a murky, emerald green world 85 feet down.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TODAY, THE libations for what may have been the nation's oldest privately owned African-American cemetery that was not part of a churchyard will be heaven-sent, rather than man-made. A prayer and libation ceremony to honor some 5,000 people buried at the rediscovered Bethel Burying Ground in Queen Village that had been set for today has been postponed - but supporters of the burial ground continue to fight for the honor they believe the sacred site deserves. "This is probably one of the most important African-American memorials or monuments we have in this town," said Joe Certaine, spokesman for the Friends of Bethel Burying Ground.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the National Constitution Center, the government shutdown is turning out to be good for business: Attendance is up 57 percent. Elfreth's Alley drew a bigger weekend crowd, Christ Church got an initial bump, and attendance is up slightly at the tours and attractions run by Historic Philadelphia Inc. It appears that the shutdown that closed Philadelphia's biggest historic sites, the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall, may be diverting visitors...
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