CollectionsHistoric Sites
IN THE NEWS

Historic Sites

NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Behind the cream-colored doors of a small wooden building rest a dozen phones, three switchboards, telephone linemen's tool kits and photos of operators with clunky headsets - all dating from the turn of the century. The Vincentown Telephone Museum is one of 10 historic sites throughout Burlington County that will greatly expand hours starting this weekend. The sites, usually open sporadically or by appointment, will be accessible the last weekend of every month through October.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Sari Harrar, Special to The Inquirer
In the beginning were Rodmantown and Chestertown - dusty neighbors on a rutted dirt road, where farmers bounced with wagonloads of crops from the rich farms of the West Jersey Colony. Those old villages are gone. Today, on their spot in southern Burlington County is Moorestown, where white-collar professionals zip to work along paved, crowded Main Street and new homes grow up on old farms. Between colonial times and the latter days of the 20th century, the story of 300 years of change and growth is clearly preserved in the varied architecture of Moorestown's homes, schools and businesses.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Gersil N. Kay, FOR THE INQUIRER
The lightning bolt that struck Loudoun mansion in Germantown in June, sending flames to the top two floors and destroying 10 to 20 percent of its meticulously preserved 19th-century furnishings, is but the latest in a series of fire disasters at historic sites. What can we learn about preservation and restoration from these misfortunes? In the last few years, three major historic sites in England have been hit by catastrophic fires. One was Uppark, a favorite great house owned by the National Trust of England.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Michael Hill, Associated Press
WATERBURY, Vt. - The floodwaters of Tropical Storm Irene that ripped up roads and washed into living rooms across Vermont took a dramatic toll on quaint old villages - filling white, steepled churches with muck and knocking 19th-century clapboard houses off their foundations. That's a big problem for a small state that cherishes its history. The classic villages of clapboard and stone buildings hugging the state's rivers and streams are the essence of Vermont and a big tourist draw.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The early days of Pennsylvania are brought to life at several historic sites in the area throughout the year. On Sunday, admission will be waived to those sites administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Hope Lodge and Graeme Park in Montgomery County and Pennsbury Manor and Washington Crossing Historic Park in Bucks County are all participating in Charter Day, the statewide celebration of the birth of Pennsylvania. Charter Day commemorates that day in 1681 when King Charles II of England signed the charter granting William Penn land in the colonies.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the enterprising years of the 1950s and '60s, a mild-mannered artist named Henry T. MacNeill quietly tried to prove that progress wasn't tearing down old buildings and replacing them with something new. To MacNeill, progress was looking to the past and preserving its treasures. MacNeill, a Philadelphia native who had moved in 1946 from Narberth to the community of Whitford, north of Downingtown, was trained as an architect, with a deep knowledge of the Colonial Revival style.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hidden in the vast Pine Barrens and all over South Jersey are old treasures waiting to be unveiled. These morsels of local history have often been overshadowed by nearby monumental landmarks such as the Liberty Bell and the Statue of Liberty. But even in the Pinelands, the most sparsely populated section of the most densely populated state, there are sites reflecting the American Revolution and the advances of the Industrial Revolution. Many are undiscovered, others open only sporadically or by appointment because of a shortage of volunteers and financing.
NEWS
November 30, 2008 | By Kia Gregory INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whether it was a refueled sense of patriotism, the urge to avoid holiday shoppers, or the desperate need to do something with family still visiting for Thanksgiving, the city's notable sites yesterday saw a steady stream of people looking to tour history. "I wanted to have a historical weekend," said Jacob Kelly, standing with his wife, Kristin, at the entrance of the "Headed to the White House" exhibit at the National Constitution Center. The Kellys, from Bloomsburg, came to celebrate Jacob's 24th birthday.
NEWS
March 13, 2005 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Happy birthday, Pennsylvania. Today, the state celebrates its founding and invites everyone to the party. Admission is waived at 26 historic sites and museums, including two in Bucks County: Pennsbury Manor in Falls Township, and Washington Crossing Historic Park. The celebration marks the granting of the charter to Pennsylvania founder William Penn by King Charles II of England in 1681. "We see that as a great reason to celebrate all things Pennsylvania, and for Pennsylvanians to recognize their own heritage," said Linda Ries, archivist with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, which administers the 26 sites.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A little steamroller is inching its way up the edge of the Delaware Canal, covering a bumpy path of grass and dirt with a smooth trail of crushed red stone. It is a cosmetic fix stretching 60 miles along Bucks County's historic towpath, a project that state officials see as the opening act in the canal's restoration after a half-century of neglect. But the coating has stirred the passions of preservationists, who see the mahogany trail as a betrayal of the county's historic district.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|