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Historic Sites

NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
Real history buffs didn't mingle with the thousands of visitors and tourists who flocked to Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and the National Constitution Center in Old City on Independence Day. Instead, they could be found along a 2-mile strip of Germantown Avenue that runs through Germantown and Mount Airy, enjoying the rich historic sites — including Cliveden, Stenton, Concord School, Johnson House and Colonial burial grounds — while...
NEWS
July 3, 2012
HERE'S A LOOK at three other recent controversial decisions by the city's Historical Commission. 1. Richardson Dilworth House, 223 S. 6th St.: In November 2007, the Historical Commission approved developer John Turchi's proposal to demolish the back half of the house where the former Philadelphia mayor lived from 1957 to 1962 to build a 16-story condominium. Dilworth and his wife moved to Society Hill, then a declining neighborhood, helping to launch the revitalization of the area and bolster the idea of urban renewal.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Should the Episcopal Cathedral of Philadelphia be allowed to destroy two historically recognized buildings it owns, and build a 25-story apartment, office, and retail complex in their place, in order to finance cathedral repairs and expand its ministry? That is the question coming Friday before the Philadelphia Historical Commission, which deadlocked on the issue May 11 when it first arose. The four representatives of the Nutter administration voted in favor of demolition of the properties on the 3700 block of Chestnut Street, while all four independent members opposed the plan.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT - On its towering hilltop perch, the Krak des Chevaliers, one of the world's best preserved Crusader castles, held off a siege by the Muslim warrior Saladin nearly 900 years ago. It was lauded by Lawrence of Arabia for its beauty and has been one of the crown jewels of Syria's tourism. But it has fallen victim to the chaos of Syria's uprising and the crackdown against it by President Bashar al-Assad's regime. Recently, gunmen broke into the castle, threw out the staff, and began excavations to loot the site, says Bassam Jammous, general director of the Antiquities and Museum Department in Damascus.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
America's historic lands are disappearing - and the rate of loss will continue accelerating without quick action, historians and federal officials say. More than 100 "nationally significant" battlefields and historic sites from the American Revolution and War of 1812 are already gone, a survey by the National Park Service has found. An additional 245 are in poor condition or fragmented, and 222 are in danger of destruction in the next 10 years. While Civil War sites have tended to receive protection, many from the earlier wars are at risk.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They say the best time to visit Shofuso, the Japanese house and garden in West Fairmount Park, is when it rains. It's not complicated: You sit or stand on the veranda of the house and quietly look - and listen. The sights and sounds are exquisite - water trilling down the rain chains, rolling cleanly off the roof, slipping silently into the pond. There's a little wind, maybe, some shivering leaves and needles and the tap of crossing branches of the Eastern white pines and Japanese maples.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | By Ken Salazar
By Ken Salazar Most Americans recognize Independence Hall as one of the most famous symbols of Philadelphia, the nation's birth, and the freedom we share as a people. Philadelphians may know it as the top tourist destination in the city, attracting 3.7 million visitors who spend $146 million every year and support more than 2,100 jobs. But we can do more to welcome tourists from across the country and especially around the globe to places like Independence Hall. President Obama wants America to be the top tourist destination in the world, and Philadelphia's history and culture make it a great place to start.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emmanuel Dungworth must have thought himself blessed when, in 1715, he chose the bank of the Pennypack Creek for his grist mill and millwright's house in the village known as the Billet. There, along an Indian trail, were water to power the mill and patrons to buy the flour. Local lore has it that George Washington stopped by to purchase grain for his militia in 1777. For nearly three centuries, the sturdy stone and wood buildings at Horsham and York Roads in what is now Hatboro have stood as a tangible link to the past.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
State police are investigating a fire that severely damaged 10 historic cottages at the Chester Heights Camp Meeting in Delaware County. No one was injured at the site, which is primarily occupied in the summer. The Chester Heights Fire Company responded at 11:30 p.m. The camp meeting, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, was struck by a serious fire in October, when three cottages and the meeting's two-story tabernacle were damaged. Three people were arrested in connection with that blaze.
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