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Historic Sites

NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emmanuel Dungworth must have thought himself blessed when, in 1715, he chose the bank of the Pennypack Creek for his grist mill and millwright's house in the village known as the Billet. There, along an Indian trail, were water to power the mill and patrons to buy the flour. Local lore has it that George Washington stopped by to purchase grain for his militia in 1777. For nearly three centuries, the sturdy stone and wood buildings at Horsham and York Roads in what is now Hatboro have stood as a tangible link to the past.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
State police are investigating a fire that severely damaged 10 historic cottages at the Chester Heights Camp Meeting in Delaware County. No one was injured at the site, which is primarily occupied in the summer. The Chester Heights Fire Company responded at 11:30 p.m. The camp meeting, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, was struck by a serious fire in October, when three cottages and the meeting's two-story tabernacle were damaged. Three people were arrested in connection with that blaze.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A chain restaurant in Wharton State Forest. A Ferris wheel at Liberty State Park. Weddings, flea markets, and corporate events taking over New Jersey's historic sites and scenic lands. That could be the future if the state goes forward with plans to privatize parts of its park system, some warn. "Next thing you know, you have to pay more for everything and the public's access is limited," said Jeff Tittel, director of the Sierra Club of New Jersey. "You'll be getting fee'd to death.
TRAVEL
December 25, 2011 | By Luaine Lee, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
BUDAPEST, Hungary - There's an easier way to see Europe than being crammed into tour buses or crowded hostels. A river cruise is one of the most relaxing and picturesque ways to view the wonders of the Continent up close. While many cruise operators prowl the waterways, one of the most comprehensive is Viking River Cruises, which boasts 19 ships (six more next year) and explores most of the navigable rivers in Europe, plus parts of Asia and Africa. Of these, the eight-day Danube cruise embarks in the historic city of Budapest and weaves its way slowly down the green margins of the Danube, through flamboyant Vienna; fairy-tale towns such as Germany's Regensburg; the lush vineyards of Austria; and, finally, Hitler's favorite city, Nuremberg.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Michael Hill, Associated Press
WATERBURY, Vt. - The floodwaters of Tropical Storm Irene that ripped up roads and washed into living rooms across Vermont took a dramatic toll on quaint old villages - filling white, steepled churches with muck and knocking 19th-century clapboard houses off their foundations. That's a big problem for a small state that cherishes its history. The classic villages of clapboard and stone buildings hugging the state's rivers and streams are the essence of Vermont and a big tourist draw.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Melanie Bavaria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Instead of a courtroom TV drama, Pennsylvanians can tune in to a historic, and real, courtroom scene Tuesday night. For the first time, the Pennsylvania Cable Network (PCN) will televise state Supreme Court proceedings. Adding to the historic tone of the occasion, the session will be held in the Supreme Court Chamber in Philadelphia's Old City Hall, next to Independence Hall, in commemoration of Constitution Week. The court was last in session there more than 200 years ago. "It seems fitting that our historic first televised session will take place in one of our nation's most historic sites - the birthplace of independence," Chief Justice Ronald Castille said in a statement.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
THERE WAS only so much tea to go around at a sweltering Fourth of July rally that filled Independence Mall yesterday. One participant on a stage set up on the mall, Herman Cain, the Georgia radio talk-show host who is seeking the GOP nomination for president, served up the hot political rhetoric most savored by the tea-party crowd. Supporters of U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, a competitor of Cain's, crowded around the stage with signs for their candidate. One Paul supporter later drew Cain's ire, peppering him with questions about his time on the board of the Federal Reserve Bank in Kansas City.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Mary Foster, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - More than a century after Homer Plessy's railroad ride across Lake Pontchartrain became the basis of the country's Jim Crow laws, descendants of Plessy and the judge who upheld "separate but equal" laws are working together to help stamp out racism. On June 7, 1892, Plessy boarded a white-only railroad car in New Orleans in a well-choreographed, deliberate violation of Louisiana law. The 30-year-old black shoemaker was arrested and a citizens' group that supported his civil disobedience sued, beginning a case often cited as one of the starting points of the modern civil rights movement.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By David Templeton, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
An excavation at a Westmoreland County site once occupied by Monongahela Indians produced abundant evidence of two villages and allowed researchers to piece together the violent end of the later settlement at the hands of invaders who sacked it, massacred its inhabitants, and burned houses and food stores, said William C. Johnson, an adviser to the project. But when Johnson returned last year to the dig, called the Kirshner site, he was stunned. "There is a drill rig and catchment basin sitting on half the village," said Johnson, who earned a doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh and served as senior prehistoric archaeologist for Michael Baker Jr. Engineering Inc. "You have something there - which is better than you get with [excavations of]
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