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Historic Sites

NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
THERE WAS only so much tea to go around at a sweltering Fourth of July rally that filled Independence Mall yesterday. One participant on a stage set up on the mall, Herman Cain, the Georgia radio talk-show host who is seeking the GOP nomination for president, served up the hot political rhetoric most savored by the tea-party crowd. Supporters of U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, a competitor of Cain's, crowded around the stage with signs for their candidate. One Paul supporter later drew Cain's ire, peppering him with questions about his time on the board of the Federal Reserve Bank in Kansas City.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Mary Foster, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - More than a century after Homer Plessy's railroad ride across Lake Pontchartrain became the basis of the country's Jim Crow laws, descendants of Plessy and the judge who upheld "separate but equal" laws are working together to help stamp out racism. On June 7, 1892, Plessy boarded a white-only railroad car in New Orleans in a well-choreographed, deliberate violation of Louisiana law. The 30-year-old black shoemaker was arrested and a citizens' group that supported his civil disobedience sued, beginning a case often cited as one of the starting points of the modern civil rights movement.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By David Templeton, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
An excavation at a Westmoreland County site once occupied by Monongahela Indians produced abundant evidence of two villages and allowed researchers to piece together the violent end of the later settlement at the hands of invaders who sacked it, massacred its inhabitants, and burned houses and food stores, said William C. Johnson, an adviser to the project. But when Johnson returned last year to the dig, called the Kirshner site, he was stunned. "There is a drill rig and catchment basin sitting on half the village," said Johnson, who earned a doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh and served as senior prehistoric archaeologist for Michael Baker Jr. Engineering Inc. "You have something there - which is better than you get with [excavations of]
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
As tourists visited Philadelphia's historic sites today in an advance of a possible government shut down, other would-be visitors to the city were being urged not to change their plans this weekend if the federal budget impasse remains unbroken. While Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell would be closed in the event of a shutdown, other historic sites and museums in and around Independence Mall will be open. They include the National Constitution Center, the Betsy Ross House, Carpenters Hall, the National Jewish Museum, and the Christ Church Burial Ground, where Ben Franklin and four other signers of the Declaration of Independence are interred.
NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A mansion whose socialite owner inspired a Hollywood movie. A popular venue for weddings that was built for the son of the owner of the country's largest distillery. An entire village that was once the bustling center of Radnor and is now just a busy intersection. What do they have in common? They all played a significant role in Radnor's history but are in danger of becoming lost to development, according to the Radnor Historical Society. "Their historic and aesthetic value is inestimable and their loss would be deeply felt by future generations," the group said in naming these and eight other iconic properties to its first Preservation Watch List.
NEWS
March 18, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mina Cockroft can't wait for the day when Historic Eden Cemetery has the prominence she says the people buried on its 53 acres deserve. The Collingdale cemetery is the final resting place for a host of Philadelphia luminaries. William Still, an abolitionist known as the father of the Underground Railroad, is buried within walking distance of famed opera singer Marian Anderson and not far from Julian Abele, an architect who had a prominent role in designing the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Yet, the cemetery founded to give African Americans a place to bury their dead is just getting by, says Cockroft, Eden's general manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
NOT PLAYING Linda Lovelace may be the best thing that ever happened to Lindsay Lohan . Aside from rehab, that is. Although Tattle was unconvinced the Lovelace biopic "Inferno" was ever going to happen - with or without Lindsay - writer-director Matthew Wilder now says his production team is negotiating with another actress and will make an announcement soon. ( People magazine says Malin Akerman of "The Heartbreak Kid" has agreed to take on the role.) With any casting change there's always oodles of speculation, but casts change in movies that haven't been greenlit more often than Lindsay changes lawyers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk
Saturday-Sunday Sing and shout, Hallelujah! Enjoy a gospel extravaganza featuring Lonnie Hunter & Structure, the Brockington Ensemble, and debuting Voices of Praise, PITC Breast Cancer Survivor Choir. All will perform during Praise Is the Cure, the fifth annual Weekend of Hope, Health, and Healing. The show will be hosted by CeCe McGhee of Praise 103.9. Proceeds will benefit the George E. Thorne Development Center breast cancer awareness program. It will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Mount Airy Church of God in Christ, 6401 Ogontz Ave. Local churches will have events Sunday.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
The Philadelphia School District and two districts in New Jersey have been awarded federal grants to improve their American history instruction, federal officials announced Monday. Philadelphia will receive $966,706, while Camden is slated to receive $497,994 and Bridgeton $498,780, from the U.S. Department of Education's Teaching of American History program. Grants were awarded to improve history instruction by underwriting intensive teacher training, study trips to historic sites, and mentoring by historians and other experts.
NEWS
July 1, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Near the terminus of a dead-end road, on a bulblike hill in the midst of a grassy meadow, a group of Temple University archaeology students and volunteers is excavating what may be one of the most important African American historical sites in New Jersey. It's called Timbuctoo - a once-thriving enclave probably founded by free African Americans and escaped slaves in the 1820s, now abandoned, if not forgotten, for more than half a century. An entire village lies beneath the grassy hill near Rancocas Creek in Westampton Township outside Mount Holly - at least 18 houses, remains of a church, two roadways, an alley, a number of privies and wells, possibly schools, and large parts of a cemetery, where 13 graves of African American troops from the Civil War are marked by headstones - but where six times as many may lie in unmarked graves.
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