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Historical Marker

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NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Driving straight from 3901 Henry Ave. in East Falls down to the Schuylkill, particularly at dusk, when the river settles like glass, with three single scullers rowing right out of an Eakins, it's not hard to see why John B. Kelly built his family home there. The neighbors - not to mention fans of Grace Kelly, Princess of Monaco, around the world - have always known that the 21/2-story brick Georgian home at Henry and Coulter Avenues was the Kelly family home. Now, everyone who passes by will also know, with the addition of a blue state historical marker outside the home commemorating the Kelly family.
NEWS
April 24, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Self-reliance is the Fine Road to Independence. - Motto of the Provincial Freeman; Mary Ann Shadd Cary, publisher. The name Mary Ann Shadd Cary may not ring too many historical bells. But thanks to two local women, Penny Washington and Robyn Young, her story will be highlighted in brief on a historical marker erected by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission soon. The marker will be placed at High and Barnard Streets in West Chester. "Mary Ann Cary was a dedicated woman with strong convictions about ending slavery in our country.
NEWS
October 12, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In her day, Alice Paul was a hunger-striker, a march leader and suffragist whose political activism landed her in jail on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Paul lobbied all her life for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, which she wrote but never saw added to the U.S. Constitution. As Paul grew older, her nephew - fearful of associating the family name with such radicalism - even shielded her from visitors. Things are much quieter today, in the years since Paul passed away in 1977 at a Moorestown nursing home at the age of 92. The right of women to vote now goes unquestioned, and the women of the Alice Paul Centennial Foundation here aren't about to shield Paul's legacy from anyone.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE STONE staircase, sandwiched between rowhouses and connecting Water Street and Front Street on an Old City block, seems like any ordinary set of old steps. Residents store their trash cans on them, and fallen leaves line the treads, which dip a bit in the middle from the masses that have climbed up and down them. But neighbors of the Wood Street Steps in Old City say they are a historic treasure, the last remaining steps of about a dozen such staircases William Penn in 1684 ordered be built to ensure public access to the increasingly congested Delaware River waterfront.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During a tour last year of the township's historic downtown, Susanne McKee noticed few tangible reminders of the municipality's past. "We walked around several blocks of downtown Williamstown," McKee said of the tour sponsored by the Monroe Township Historical Society, "and nearly every building or place mentioned no longer existed. You had to imagine what the place was like, and, if you weren't on the tour and were passing through town, you'd never know what once was here. " For McKee, a member of the society, that episode sparked an idea to erect markers at the sites of old buildings - both extant and razed - as a way of keeping alive memories of yesteryear.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just past the busy intersection of Germantown and Butler Pikes, inside the stone-walled art studio where Roy Wilson and his wife, Ann Hopkins Wilson, now sculpt and paint, Frederick Douglass, a former slave, once spoke. In a space that came to be called Abolition Hall, Lucretia Mott enjoined local residents to enlist in the antislavery movement. Composer Stephen Foster and publisher William Lloyd Garrison told of slavery's evils. Though it may not look it today, the late-1700s carriage shed-turned-political-meeting place has been deemed of statewide and national significance by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
NEWS
October 16, 1995 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It used to be that few in Philadelphia remembered Eddie Lang. Soon, it will be hard for anyone to forget him. In the latest tribute to the South Philadelphian known as the father of jazz guitar, his nephews, Ed and Tom Massaro, unveiled a historical marker yesterday that will soon be planted at Seventh and Clymer Streets in their uncle's honor. More than 50 people gathered on the breezy street corner in Bella Vista across from the Saloon as the Massaro brothers prepared to remove the dark blue cloth covering the marker from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jill Anna Greenberg
A historical marker was unveiled Saturday at the site of Camp William Penn, the site where black Union soldiers were trained during the Civil War. The site in LaMott was the nation's largest, and the state's only, training camp for black soldiers.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
A historical marker is dedicated at Simon Gratz High School to honor Dodger great Roy Campanella. What? The Phanatic a Dodgers fan? The Phanatic yesterday helped Garrett Bagley, dean of students, with the unveiling. Campanella, after all, was a Philadelphia native. He got his first taste of stardom at Simon Gratz.
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NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Howard Sullivan remembers riding on construction equipment at Broad and Oxford Streets when he was 10, as workers broke ground at Progress Plaza and his father's dream became reality. The shopping center, which opened in 1968 in the heart of North Philadelphia, was the brainchild of the Rev. Leon Sullivan, a civil rights icon who fought apartheid in South Africa and encouraged black economic development at home. Sullivan Progress Plaza, as it is now known, was the first shopping center in the country that was developed, owned, and operated by African Americans.
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
AS YOU MAKE the way into Xfinity Live! from the Wells Fargo Center, you pass a statue of Gary Dornhoefer scoring the Flyers' first-ever overtime goal, against the Minnesota North Stars in Game 5 of a first-round playoff series in 1973, and propelling the franchise to its first playoff series win. There's Kate Smith in the middle of "God Bless America," the Flyers' good-luck charm during their Stanley Cup runs of 1974 and 1975. There's also one of Julius Erving, ball high above his head in his right hand, legs bent and ready for flight.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state historical marker will be installed in front of the Curtis Center at 11 a.m. Wednesday honoring artist Maxfield Parrish, who attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in the 1890s. The Curtis Center, at Sixth and Walnut Streets, is home to Parrish's celebrated Dream Garden , an enormous glass mosaic created in collaboration with Louis Comfort Tiffany, and the subject of one of the city's most contentious preservation battles. The 15-by-49-foot mural was designed as the crown jewel of Cyrus Curtis' 1910 headquarters, where such magazines as the Saturday Evening Post and Ladies Home Journal were published.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred years ago, on April 7, 1915, one of the 20th century's greatest singers was born in Philadelphia. The name on the birth certificate was Elinore Harris, born in Philadelphia General Hospital on Curie Boulevard in West Philadelphia, a tax-supported municipal hospital that ministered mostly to indigent patients. She became known to the world as Billie Holiday, a transcendent singer with a tragic American life. Fans of jazz - of music, period - will observe her centenary worldwide.
SPORTS
May 22, 2014 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
THEY CALLED Eddie Gottlieb "The Mogul" because of the ability and power he had to get things done. In the early days of the NBA, he was the man who got the league moving in the right direction. Heck, he was putting the schedules together by hand in the 1970s. A lot of that same persistance and determination have been the impetus behind installation of a historic marker that will be unveiled today at South Philadelphia High School. Gottlieb, founder of the Philadelphia SPHAs and former coach and owner of the Warriors, who is enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., was a 1916 graduate of South Philly High, and it is where he discovered basketball.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE STONE staircase, sandwiched between rowhouses and connecting Water Street and Front Street on an Old City block, seems like any ordinary set of old steps. Residents store their trash cans on them, and fallen leaves line the treads, which dip a bit in the middle from the masses that have climbed up and down them. But neighbors of the Wood Street Steps in Old City say they are a historic treasure, the last remaining steps of about a dozen such staircases William Penn in 1684 ordered be built to ensure public access to the increasingly congested Delaware River waterfront.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Driving straight from 3901 Henry Ave. in East Falls down to the Schuylkill, particularly at dusk, when the river settles like glass, with three single scullers rowing right out of an Eakins, it's not hard to see why John B. Kelly built his family home there. The neighbors - not to mention fans of Grace Kelly, Princess of Monaco, around the world - have always known that the 21/2-story brick Georgian home at Henry and Coulter Avenues was the Kelly family home. Now, everyone who passes by will also know, with the addition of a blue state historical marker outside the home commemorating the Kelly family.
SPORTS
September 12, 2012 | Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - A fan of Muhammad Ali has acquired an important piece of memorabilia: the boxing great's boyhood home. Las Vegas real estate investor Jared Weiss closed on the property earlier this week, a Louisville realtor told the Associated Press on Tuesday. Realtor Dave Lambrechts said Weiss paid $70,000 for the small white house with a sagging front porch overhang at 3302 West Grand Ave., in a neighborhood of neat, modest homes. "The guy's a huge Ali fan, and that's what kind of spurred this," Lambrechts said.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Ira Tucker Jr. used to think that going to Sister Rosetta Tharpe's house was like going to Hollywood. Even if all he did was cross Broad Street into Yorktown. But here, on the east side of North Philadelphia, was where many African American role models lived - the schoolteachers, lawyers, and doctors who mowed the lawns in front of their homes and parked late-model cars in their garages. "You'd see these people and think, 'I might be able to get here someday,' " Tucker said Monday.
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