CollectionsHistory
IN THE NEWS

History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The new hobby Edgar Stern had been searching for was there all along. "My grandfather made this in the 1930s, in Germany," the 89-year-old Cinnaminson resident says, holding up a hand-carved wooden plaque, known as a mizrach, of the type often found in Jewish homes. "I was looking for something new to do, and it gave me an idea," adds Stern, who was barely 9 when he and his family fled Hitler's Germany. "Why don't I try woodworking?" Since that inspiration about four years ago, the retired therapist has crafted dozens of decorative objects in his meticulously organized workshop and given most away.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Frank Fox didn't speak a word of English when he immigrated to the United States from his native Poland as a teenager in 1937. But he got into Central High School two years later and spent the rest of his life learning, writing, teaching, and translating. He was fluent in seven languages. Dr. Fox, 92, who lived at the Quadrangle in Haverford, died Tuesday, Aug. 2, of complications of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. "I could spend hours telling you about him," said his son, Julian.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Silk Roads A New History of the World By Peter Frankopan. Knopf. 672 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul M. Cobb I n the year 1238, at the abbey of St. Albans, a serene 20 miles or so northwest of London, a medieval scribe named Matthew Paris recorded some tragic news about fish. In that year, the fishermen and merchants from the Baltic who ordinarily crossed the North Sea to take part in the herring fishing off the coast of England did not dare leave their homes.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITER
Howard H. Lewis, 81, of Devon, a Philadelphia lawyer and philanthropist, died Thursday, July 28, of respiratory failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Lewis was senior counsel at Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads L.L.P., with an emphasis on corporate law, trusts and estates, and real estate transactions. Before Montgomery McCracken, Mr. Lewis was chair of the corporate law department at what is now Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel L.L.P. Early in his career, he was lead counsel when the Reading Co. declared bankruptcy in 1976.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
The Secret War Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas By Max Hastings Harper. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow At first glance, Joseph Rochefort was about as unlikely as a war hero gets. A mediocre (at best) naval officer, he narrowly escaped court martial when a destroyer on which he was the duty officer dragged its anchor in San Francisco bay amid six destroyers. He was transferred to cryptoanalysis when fellow officers noted his penchant for crossword puzzles and bridge.
NEWS
July 30, 2016
Hillary Clinton's hard-fought entry into the history books as the first woman a major party has nominated for president is the culmination of generations of struggles and sacrifices. Women have fought for equal footing with men since the nation's earliest days. Just a year after the colonists met in Philadelphia to declare their independence from England, the states enacted laws prohibiting women from participating in the new nation by voting. Those laws were followed by further statutes and court decisions relegating women to second-class status when it came to owning property, working, and controlling their bodies.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Delegate Janet King is staying at a Marriott in Lansdale, Montgomery County, a good 35 miles from the Democratic National Convention in South Philadelphia. But what's 35 miles when you've traveled more than 8,000 miles through 10 time zones to get here, when you live so far away that at midmorning Thursday here it's already Friday back home? And what is any distance when you are making history, as King is? She is one of 13 delegates from the Northern Mariana Islands, the newest U.S. territory, which is sending representatives to the Democratic convention for the first time.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
I don't need to tell you what to expect Thursday night when history-making Hillary Clinton accepts her party's nod for president. You know you'll hear the same themes, even phrases, of her long campaign; and likely a little women's history since she's the first major-party female nominee. So maybe a reference to Seneca Falls, N.Y., site in 1848 of the first women's rights convention. Maybe a mention that her mother was born on the same day, June 4, 1919, that, she says, "Congress was passing the 19th Amendment" giving women the right to vote.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
The White House photograph has become an icon: President Obama bending low in front of his desk in the Oval Office so a 5-year-old African American boy could touch his hair. "I want to know if my hair is just like yours," Jacob Philadelphia asked in 2009, as he and his family gathered for a picture with the president. "Why don't you touch it and see for yourself?" Obama said, lowering his head. "Touch it, dude!" As Obama arrives in Philadelphia on Wednesday to speak to the Democratic National Convention, the debate on his legacy is well underway.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|