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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
About a week before the Montgomery County Junior Championship, Tony Leodora made a frustrating phone call to Sam and Dina DiLisio. He told them there would be no Montgomery County Junior Girls' Championship this year. Their daughter Isabella, a two-time winner of the event, was the only golfer to sign up, so there was no one to compete against. But Leodora slept on it and had a solution in the morning. "I'm not one to push people into things," said Leodora, the executive director of the Montgomery County Amateur Championship.
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bits of hand-painted porcelain - likely part of a 19th-century teapot - were pulled from clumps of earth as the archaeologists shifted through the excavation site. A copper knot that may have been part of an earring dropped by a visitor long ago was found, along with a piece of a figurine monkey and the base of a wine bottle. One hundred and thirty-nine years ago, the ground where the artifacts were unearthed was the location of a Japanese garden and bazaar, one of the attractions at Philadelphia's Centennial Exposition in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Lansdowne Avenue, next to two benches and a bus stop, stands a new historical marker, blue with gold letters, 10 feet tall. "Looks nice," said Robyn Young, 61, the woman responsible, seeing it for the first time this week. "Taller than I thought it would be. " She pushed on the pole, kicked at the fresh dirt. "It's in there nice and firm. " Dedicated to archaeologist Tatiana Proskouriakoff, who "published a paper that revolutionized the world's understanding of Mayan hieroglyphs," the marker culminates years of effort by Young.
NEWS
July 22, 2015
I FOUND STU BYKOFSKY'S repugnant traducement of the late Howard Zinn and his literary accomplishment, A People's History of The United States , patently offensive and despicable. This polemic rant is an affront to traditional journalistic diplomacy and tact. Mr. Bykofsky's attack is rife with opinionated and subjective reckoning concerning Howard Zinn, his intentions and his works. He also managed to disparage the substantive benevolence of the efforts from members of our City Council, marginalize the convictions of an entire community of intellectuals, insidiously inject politically polarized conflagrations, and make asinine presumptions about contemporary American history and modern American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
PICTURE A grizzly, swashbuckling pirate who sails the high seas in search of ships to plunder. Now, add a yarmulke. Actually, Jewish pirates who ransacked Spanish ships in Caribbean waters during Colonial times wore more intimidating Cavalier-style hats. But make no mistake: There were Jewish pirates of the Caribbean. "They were pirates through and through," said Sahar Oz, director of programming for the Gershman Y, which hosts a talk about the Sephardic seafarers Thursday, in conjunction with a photo exhibit on Caribbean synagogues.
SPORTS
July 20, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
One of the few benefits for a baseball organization with a long history of failure that has been interrupted only occasionally by brief fits of competence is that it is very difficult to set team records for futility. God bless the Phillies, though. They're taking a run at it. Since the team began playing, a stretch of a mere 133 years, the Phils have won two lonely championships and had only 58 winning seasons. That's a lot of losing. They lost at least 100 games 14 times, including 1941, when they set the franchise mark of 111 losses with a team that had Cy Blanton and Si Johnson in the starting rotation and nothing but sighs coming from the stands.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its legal fight to keep union carpenters out of the building, the Convention Center's lawyers took a walk through the dark side of local labor history this week. Legal briefs filed in the center's civil racketeering federal lawsuit against the Carpenters' union compared its actions to recent headline-grabbing convictions of members of Local 401 of the Ironworkers' union and of Local 30 of the Roofers' union - another racketeering case, dating back 30 years. Tuesday's filing was the latest salvo in the continuing battle between the Convention Center and the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The driver of the car that killed a Northeast Philadelphia mother and three of her children in 2013 had been warned by police about street racing a week before the deadly crash, an officer testified Friday. Manheim Township, Pa., Police Officer Thomas Miles said he visited Khusen Akhmedov at his home in Lancaster after a complaint about Akhmedov's driving was filed by a woman who had copied down the license plate of his silver 2012 Audi S4. Miles was a witness at Akhmedov's nonjury trial in Common Pleas Court in the July 16, 2013 deaths of Samara Banks, 27, and three of her four sons in a Roosevelt Boulevard crash that prosecutors say happened during a late-night drag race with another driver.
SPORTS
July 8, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
When Christie Rampone took the field for the United States in the 86th minute of the Women's World Cup final on Sunday evening, slipping on the captain's armband one last time, the reverberations in Vancouver's BC Place stadium were also the echoes of the cheers that followed the first rock stars of women's soccer in this country, the 1999 national team. Rampone was the final remaining vestige of that team, which was, at least until Sunday, the standard by which all succeeding teams have been measured.
NEWS
July 7, 2015
C. DALLETT HEMPHILL, a professor of American history at Ursinus College for the last 28 years and a leading scholar on Philadelphia, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital-Center City after a prolonged battle with cancer. She was 56 and lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County. Hemphill's academic specialty was the social history of the United States, from the Colonial era into the 19th century. She wrote two books, both published by Oxford University Press: Bowing to Necessities: A History of Manners in America, 1620-1860 , and Siblings: Brothers and Sisters in American History . Hemphill shared the preoccupations of her generation of historians with social history and women's history.
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