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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
They're thinking about it. They have to be thinking about it. How could they not be thinking about it? These are the Washington Capitals. This is the franchise that has lost 10 postseason series in which it held a two-game lead, including one last year. No NHL franchise has lost more, and the Capitals have been around only since 1974. They're younger than Jaromir Jagr. And here they are, having won the first three games of this first-round series against the Flyers, now facing a Game 6 at the Wells Fargo Center on Sunday, and they wouldn't be human, and they certainly wouldn't be Washington Capitals, if they weren't thinking about that history, and if it weren't weighing on them a bit. "I don't think this team has any playoff history.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Borromeo String Quartet violinist Nicholas Kitchen expands on his thoughts about the intersection of classical music and emerging technology. Do you think it is inevitable that printed music will go away or perhaps become a quaint old rarity?   Let me consider a slightly different question as a prelude to answering the main question: What are the benefits reading music from PDF files instead of paper? Let's just consider that basically most everyone on earth has or is trying to get a computer, tablet, or smartphone, as well as access to the internet.
SPORTS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Mclane, STAFF WRITER
On Second Thought    Only seven quarterbacks have been chosen with the No. 2 overall pick in the draft since the 1970 NFL merger. The Eagles, after pulling off a blockbuster trade with the Browns on Wednesday, will make it eight next Thursday. It will be the second time for the franchise after it selected Donovan McNabb in 1999.    Howie Roseman didn't tip his hand as to whether the Eagles will choose Carson Wentz or Jared Goff, but all signs point to the former with the Rams reportedly set to take Goff at No. 1. Either way, quarterbacks will be taken with the first two picks for the sixth time since 1970.
NEWS
April 18, 2016
Frank Wilson is a retired Inquirer book editor Thanks to those videotaped interviews in which representatives of Planned Parenthood sound to many people as if they're discussing the sale of body parts obtained by means of abortion, Margaret Sanger - the woman behind Planned Parenthood - is being paid attention to again. Why, there's even an online quiz you can take consisting of a set of quotations, some by Sanger, others by Ayn Rand, author of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged . You have to figure out who said which.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
Spain in Our Hearts Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939 By Adam Hochschild Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 464 pp. $30 Reviewed by Bob Drogin The Spanish Civil War (1936-39) is most notable to historians for how it foreshadowed the horrors of World War II. Yet, few distant conflicts are so burned into our culture and consciousness. Ernest Hemingway, who covered the war, made it the setting of For Whom the Bell Tolls . George Orwell, who fought in it, called his popular memoir Homage to Catalonia . Less well known are the 2,800 American men and women who risked their lives to defend Spain's democratically elected government.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Cosmic themes typically aren't the domain of commercial litigators such as David Pittinsky, who practices with Ballard Spahr in Center City. They focus on nitty-gritty factual and legal issues for clients seeking an edge in business disputes. Yet the question emerges from a legal dispute that has its roots in the Aug. 9, 2014, police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and the catastrophic riots that ensued. In November, Pittinsky was hired by a small group of predominantly African American municipalities near St. Louis to challenge Missouri's principal reform measure after Brown's slaying: a law sharply reducing the amount of money the towns could use from traffic fines and other offenses to fund municipal budgets.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
Speaking from across the Delaware River in Camden, Walt Whitman described baseball as "America's game," with "the snap, go, fling, of the American atmosphere. " As the 2016 season starts, consider Shibe Park, onetime home to Philadelphia's Athletics and Phillies, demolished 40 years ago this year. Named after Athletics majority owner Ben Shibe, the stadium was bounded by what are now West Lehigh Avenue and North 20th, West Somerset, and North 21st Streets. Unlike the then-popular wooden and brick "bowls," Shibe Park boasted a skeleton of steel and concrete - baseball's first.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Whether on his own or as part of the long-running rock-soul soap opera that is the J. Geils Band, singer-songwriter-harmonicat Peter Wolf is legendary for his roots. Not tonsorial roots (though he does have good rock-guy hair, especially for a 70-year-old), but his formation in the firmament of classic, ragged R&B, blues and - from the sound of his new album, A Cure for Loneliness - bluegrass. Wolf will be in Philadelphia Saturday to play WXPN-FM's Big Night Out fund-raiser at World Cafe Live.
SPORTS
April 7, 2016
HOUSTON - To win the national title, all Villanova had to do was beat Miami, which was ranked 10th heading into the NCAA Tournament. And Kansas, which was No. 1. Then Oklahoma, which was seventh. And finally North Carolina, which was third. Miami was the only one that hadn't made it to No. 1 at some point. And Iowa, the Wildcats' second-round opponent, reached No. 3 in late January. When Villanova won it all in 1985 as an eight seed, the Wildcats had to beat two No. 1 seeds (Michigan and Georgetown)
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