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NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE OLDEST house in Bellmawr, Camden County, sat in the back corner of a sprawling cemetery, mostly unnoticed, for centuries. The Hugg/Harrison/Glover house, as one local historian called the brick home, had additions tacked on over time, paint splattered over paint and covered in wallpaper. The date "1764" painted across the bricks of its west wall were hidden by trees and vegetation. Now the home's age is visible to thousands, day and night, unveiled atop a hill of dirt where South Jersey's busiest highways meet thanks to a Department of Transportation project that could turn it into rubble.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
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SPORTS
January 21, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Penn women's basketball coach Mike McLaughlin originally didn't think his Quakers had a shot at the player he now describes as a game-changer for his defending Ivy League champions. Life works that way sometimes. It's the surprises that can change everything. Sydney Stipanovich, now a sophomore at Penn, was a big-time high school center in St. Louis. Missouri offered her a scholarship early. Her father had gone to Missouri, and her older brother. Her sister now goes there. Her uncle Steve was a star player there before he became the second pick of the 1983 NBA draft.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Even as a toddler, Timothy Denevi showed signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. By sixth grade, his angry tantrums had turned into physical fights with schoolmates. ADHD was not only affecting his mood, but threatening to compromise his academic record. But about 20 years later, Denevi has overcome his symptoms. He graduated from the University of Iowa with an M.F.A. degree in nonfiction and is now a visiting writer at George Mason University. "I'm very lucky," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I'm a 32-year-old woman. I met a guy who on our first date told me had prostate cancer, but that doctors had operated on him and he was now cancer free. We had an OK time and he asked me out again. My friend said I shouldn't go out with him because of his medical history. What do you think?   Mia: Sorry, girlfriend, but you're not giving us enough information. Are you saying you're squeamish just because he had cancer? Or are you concerned about his ability to father children, or even just get and maintain an erection?
SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Surrounded by Fishtown's redbrick sea, Palmer Cemetery is an eerie urban island. Neighbors of the 250-year-old burial grounds insist spirits of the Revolutionary and Civil War veterans interred there sometimes prowl its weathered headstones and foreboding maples. Meanwhile, just a block away, another more tangible neighborhood ghost is stirring to life. At the cramped corner of Tulip and Palmer Streets, a long-abandoned Industrial Age building that, in terms of its baseball pedigree, may now be the most significant structure in Philadelphia is being converted into 30 apartments.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia and history go together like the Fourth of July and fireworks, like pretzels and mustard, like Hall and Oates. Philadelphia and American history, that is. World history? The connection isn't so obvious. But when DK Publishing and the Smithsonian Institution set out recently to tell the story of humankind through 1,000 objects, on the premise that humans define themselves by what they make, they turned to the Penn Museum for much of their material. More than 200 of the objects photographed for the book are from the Penn collection - and many of them are on display for you to see. The red-brick building, in the shadow of Franklin Field between 32d and 33d Streets, houses a world-class assemblage of about a million artifacts, from Egyptian mummies to Chinese statues to pottery fashioned in Central America 2,000 years before the arrival of Europeans.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"YOU COULD get hurt being out here, because there are a lot of weirdos out there. " Robert Palen allegedly gave that warning to a woman he approached on a late-summer night in 2010. Not long after Palen offered that advice, the woman later told police, he allegedly raped her on a park bench in a secluded area. Judging by his criminal record, Palen knows a lot about hurting women. Palen, 38, was hauled back to Philly on Dec. 26 after rotting in a Wisconsin prison for more than a year, police sources told the Daily News last night.
TRAVEL
December 29, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
Unspoiled white-sand beaches, turquoise-blue waters, frolicking green sea turtles, and bays, lagoons, and reefs so idyllic you have to pinch yourself just to make sure they're real - the Grenadines are one of the most spectacular sailing destinations in the world. In this archipelago of sun-splashed Caribbean islands that stretch from Grenada to St. Vincent, there's so much to explore that it would take a lifetime to truly appreciate it all. With only two weeks and a chartered sailboat, my photographer and I did our best to get a taste of this fabled paradise.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - When David Carmicheal was growing up in rural Ohio, he asked his father to build him shelves so he could display his historic artifacts, the Civil War bullets and other objects he collected. Today, he has lots of shelves to manage - several miles of them. Carmicheal took over as Pennsylvania archivist last month, overseeing 220 million documents. Among them is Pennsylvania's hallowed founding document, Penn's Charter, housed for now in a windowless tower next to the State Museum in the Capitol complex.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Ma, For The Inquirer
Graffiti crawl up exterior walls like webs of ivy, bending and twisting around rows of shuttered windows. At some street corners, layers of posters pile unevenly over this graffiti like papier mâché, stitching together urban blocks. When I traveled to Greece this year, my original itinerary focused on ancient history sites: the Parthenon, the National Archaeological Museum, and the Agora. These places all tell valuable Greek stories from centuries past through classical busts, orderly columns, and symmetrical ruins.
SPORTS
December 6, 2014 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
The following is a partial list of changes to the lives of members of the Archbishop Carroll boys' basketball team since 2008, the last time anyone other than Neumann-Goretti won the Catholic League. Accra, Ghana, circa 2010. Ernest Aflakpui, a promising soccer player in the West African nation's capital city, grows four inches. His cousin Michael Jones puts a basketball in his hands. They practice Euro steps on a little hoop in the living room. Aflakpui is raw, but takes to the game well enough to consider playing opportunities in the United States.
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