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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016
By Steven Conn Though he has lost the nomination, Bernie Sanders still promises a "fundamental transformation" of the Democratic Party when he and his delegates come to Philadelphia next month. In what could prove a nasty convention fight, Sanders will push for "the most progressive platform ever passed by the Democratic Party. " And to prove he's serious, he still will not endorse Hilary Clinton. As he has campaigned, Sanders has cast his smorgasbord of proposals as nothing more (or less)
BUSINESS
June 10, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
It was the presidential election year of 1992 and Tim Lewis, then a young federal court judge in Pittsburgh, was watching a televised debate between Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) and his challenger, Lynn Yeakel. Yeakel went after Specter for the GOP's failure to nominate African Americans to the federal bench. But Specter had a ready answer. "Specter said, 'Well that is not true. There is a young African American judge in Pittsburgh who we are going to put on the Third Circuit,' " Lewis recalled.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Gratz College recently received an endowment gift of $1 million, the largest such gift in the Montgomery County institution's 120-year history, officials said Tuesday. The gift was bequeathed by Berenice Abrams, an alumna from the class of 1936, in memory of her parents, said Joy Goldstein, the college's president. The gift is restricted for the use of the Benjamin and Dorothy Abrams Scholarship Fund, which will aid teachers working in the field of Jewish education. Abrams, 96, died in 2014.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Nearly 300 puppies are safe after they were rescued from what authorities called inhumane conditions in a New Jersey home. The 276 animals were rescued over 15 hours Friday from a residence in Howell Township, Monmouth County, officials said. The pups are safe and receiving care at shelters, the Monmouth County SPCA said. The Monmouth County Sheriff's Office called the conditions at the home "deplorable" and said in a Facebook post that the incident marked "the worst animal hoarding case in the history of Monmouth County.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Sean O'Casey is an iconic figure in Irish drama, and his trilogy about the Dublin of the 1920s - The Shadow of a Gunman , Juno and the Paycock , and The Plough and the Stars - features his most famous plays. The last of the three is the new production of the Irish Heritage Theatre (a coproduction with Plays and Players), commemorating the 100th anniversary of what is known as the Easter Rising, a failed attempt to free Ireland from British rule. All, set in Dublin slums, provoked riots when they were premiered at the Abbey Theatre.
NEWS
May 31, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
How do you distinguish a foreign policy "idealist" from a "realist," an optimist from a pessimist? Ask one question: Do you believe in the arrow of history? Or to put it another way, do you think history is cyclical or directional? Are we condemned to do the same damn thing over and over, generation after generation - or is there hope for some enduring progress in the world order? For realists, generally conservative, history is an endless cycle of clashing power politics. The same patterns repeat.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Roots 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday on History, with simulcast on A&E and Lifetime.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
By William Ecenbarger STEWARTSTOWN, Pa. - Under mouse-gray skies promising rain at any minute, some 100 people gathered over the weekend in a muddy farm field along the Mason-Dixon Line in York County, Pa., and Harford County, Md., and formed a circle around a shallow, elliptical enclosure. Inside was the remaining six-inch stub of a limestone boundary marker placed there by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon 21/2 centuries ago, and next to it was a new four-foot replica of that stone placed there this year by a group of preservationists.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tucked into the usual Broadway Playbill for the new hit Shuffle Along at the Music Box Theatre is something that's not the typical size or color: a sepia replica of the show's original 1921 program from the long-demolished 63rd Street Music Hall, evidence of the distant world from which the show comes. Known as the first African American megahit, the 1921 version of Shuffle Along made the careers of songwriters Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle and helped launch Florence Mills, Adelaide Hall, and Josephine Baker.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
LaRose By Louise Erdrich Harper. 384 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Michael Broida Out hunting along the blurred line of reservation land in rural North Dakota, Landreaux takes aim at a buck. By the time he realizes his mistake, it is too late: He has mistakenly killed Dusty, his neighbor's son. Landreaux and his wife, Emmaline, take an old form of justice to their neighbors, Peter and Nola, who is Emmaline's half-sister: "Our son will be your son now. " It is the giving of this boy, LaRose, that forms the solemn linchpin of Louise Erdrich's new novel, LaRose . The tragedy that connects these two families is at once singular and deeply historical, as Erdrich weaves in the history of a land and an Ojibwe people at once divided by tragedy yet unified in their love and adoration for the boy LaRose.
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