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NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Kelley thinks roller coasters and haunted houses have a lot in common. "[They] share the appeal of being something that seems really dangerous, but at the same time you know you're safe," says Kelley, senior vice president and director of public programming at Eastern State Penitentiary. "Haunted houses are like that in that you feel like you're going in somewhere you shouldn't be. " This Halloween, spooky thrills aren't contained within four walls. Festivities throughout Philadelphia cater to the whole family, from date night-worthy scares and beer-boosted tours to kid-friendly excursions.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Deborah Waxman leafed through her mail before unwrapping a small orange, the punch line to a fabled Jewish myth. As it went, a rabbi once teased that a woman rabbi was like an orange on a ceremonial seder plate used during Passover. Neither belonged. The orange was a sly affirmation from a friend, mailed to Waxman as a symbol of the history she made by becoming the first woman and the first lesbian to lead a major movement of Judaism. Waxman, 47, took over in January as head of the Reconstructionist movement and president of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, the movement's seminary.
SPORTS
October 21, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Lost in the shuffle of the Flyers' 6-5 comeback win in Dallas on Saturday night was the fact that Pierre-Edouard Bellemare was part of a historic event. The Flyers' 29-year-old center and his fellow countryman and role model, Dallas' Antoine Roussel, became the first France-born players to face each other in an NHL game, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. "It was special," Bellemare said in his thick French accent. "It felt great. " Bellemare and Roussel went to dinner Friday night, but that their main topic wasn't the history they were about to make.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
Dotty Brown is a former Inquirer editor who is writing a book on the history of Boathouse Row for Temple University Press Every year, thousands of people pound down the paved backbone of the city in the sweaty exuberance of the Broad Street Run. Next weekend, in another extraordinary test of athleticism and determination open to all, the sound will be the beating of oars down a different city artery - the Schuylkill. Rowing out their hearts and lungs in the Head of the Schuylkill Regatta will be more than 80 categories of rowers sorted by age, sex, and ability, from high school teenagers and college freshmen to committed athletes striving for world competition to masters rowers in their 50s, 60s, 70s, and, yes, 80s. Also racing will be gold-medal Olympic champions from New Zealand and top rowers from Norway, Australia, the Czech Republic, and the United States.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Barbara Solem wrote the book she wanted to read about the pioneering South Jersey settlement where industry made history. Batsto Village: Jewel of the Pines (Plexus Publishing) is the author's lively chronicle of an unusual company town, later a gentleman's farm and, more recently, a visitor destination, in Wharton State Forest. While a number of local histories include chapters about Batsto, Solem's is the first commercially published, book-length treatment of a subject that has long fascinated her. "I love research.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2014 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ABOARD THE M/V VIKING IDI - Johann Strauss notwithstanding, the Danube is not blue - rather, a dull gray-green - but this chromatic error takes none of the romance and majesty away from Europe's greatest river as it winds through spectacular reminders of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance history. We - that, is my 168 fellow passengers and I - cruise past terraced vineyards that have been producing wine for a thousand years, red-roofed villages visited by Charlemagne and Napoleon, ruined castles built in the 13th century to repel Mongol invaders, and the remnants of Roman walls that resonate with centuries.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago. The lone reminder of the city's crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to "his master's voice. " Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
CHEF Brian Oliveira and restaurant-business partner Christian Mora hope to make history by giving their employees a living wage, health care, sick leave and vacations at their soon-to-open Girard Brasserie & Bruncherie in Fishtown. Living wage/no tips would have meant no hassles for Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean "Shady" McCoy, who was virally tackled on social media recently after leaving a 20-cent tip on a $60 tab at a Northern Liberties burger joint. And living wage/no tips would have meant no staffer lawsuits against Chickie's & Pete's that cost the restaurant chain a reported $8.5 million in settlements.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Tom Russo is so incredibly human and warm it's hard to accept that he's passionate about machines. So passionate, in fact, that in his own time and with his own money, Russo, of Garnet Valley, has established a museum - believed to be the only one of its kind and scope in the country - devoted solely to the evolution of business technology through the centuries. The setting of this temple to early technology is an ordinary, three-story commercial building on a highway in Wilmington that's loaded with 3,000 items showing the history of everything from primitive counting and adding devices to cash registers.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
LARRY ROBIN wants to dig deeper into Philadelphia's role in the Underground Railroad. Robin, director of Moonstone Arts Center, and formerly of Robin's Bookstore, designed the center's upcoming Hidden History Program, "The Underground Railroad in Philadelphia. " The events will run from Sept. 29-Oct. 26. The program will kick off Monday with a showing and discussion of the film "The Underground Railroad: The William Still Story," at 5:30 p.m. at Walnut Street West Library. Moonstone Arts Center is offering nine free showings of the film throughout the program.
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