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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
July 18, 2016
Name: History Here. What it does: Provides nuggets of history about thousands of locations across the United States, including famous homes, battlefields, museums, and more. It can be used to prepare for a trip or to discover what's around you on a current trip. You can keep your own to-see list in "My Places. " Available: In the App Store, requires iOS 7.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. In Google Play, requires 4.0 and up. Cost: Free.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
It took them 13 years, but an eclectic crew of volunteers and visionaries has transformed a vacant 19th-century church into the Camden Shipyard & Maritime Museum. Opening Sept. 11 in the resilient rowhouse neighborhood/emerging arts district known as Waterfront South, the architecturally impressive and thematically ambitious museum will showcase the history of the city's shipbuilding and related industries, where tens of thousands of people once worked. Camden's maritime might spurred development of entire city neighborhoods such as Fairview, as well as nearby suburban communities such as Audubon Park and Brooklawn.
REAL_ESTATE
July 17, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
The first real estate piece I wrote for the Inquirer, back in March 1989, was on how to determine your house's age. That was nearly 5,000 articles ago, and it applied specifically to Philadelphia and the older suburbs, but it was inspired by what I went through to determine when and by whom my first two city houses were built. Every old building has a story, though it often isn't until that building is repurposed that you hear it. In April, I wrote about MM Partners' $12 million redo: the A.F. Bornot Lofts at 17th Street and Fairmount Avenue, a mixed-use project with 17 loft-style rental apartments, two for-sale townhouses, underground parking, and five businesses comprising 15,000 square feet.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Howard Gensler, Staff Writer
The magnet on the refrigerator was a saying from football coach Bill Parcells that hung in quarterback Phil Simms' locker: "Blame nobody. Expect nothing. Do something. " Brad Furman's mother put it up when Brad was a boy growing up in Lafayette Hill, 35 minutes from Center City. Both have taken it to heart. Furman, who graduated from Friends' Central School, decided early on he wanted to be in the movie business, moved to L.A., and, through force of determination, made it happen.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Roy Peterson
  Summer is here, and the warm weather has flooded historic Philadelphia with thousands of tourists - everyone from American schoolchildren to international guests. Some locals might scoff at this influx of curious visitors, but not me. Their presence reminds me that I live in a special city. The cobblestone streets that I walk every day were the cornerstones of our nation. And because faith was so important to our nation's founders, it is impossible to explore the City of Brotherly Love without noting the centrality of religious institutions.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Karen Warrington
  I am a grandmother of a 22-year-old college student, a black male. Many times over breakfast, I have tried to get him to read a story in the local newspaper. Sometimes he will give it a glance, but usually his attention is on his phone. Thursday morning, he pulled me into his telephone world. He showed me the story of the Twin Cities police shooting of Philando Castile and his girlfriend's wrenching account of sitting next to her dying boyfriend. The story had not yet made print media, but social media had taken the story around the world in moments.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
When delegates and visitors arrive for the Democratic National Convention this month, it will mark the 12th presidential convention in Philadelphia history. In 1848, the Whig Party nominated Zachary Taylor for president at the former Chinese Museum at Ninth and Sansom Streets. In 1856, the American Party chose Millard Fillmore as its candidate at National Hall, 12th and Market. Ulysses S. Grant was the Republican Party choice in 1872 at the Academy of Music, at Broad and Locust. Just some of the history you can uncover at an exhibit showcasing Philadelphia's presidential convention history, 1848-2016, unveiled Thursday by former Gov. Ed Rendell, chairman of the Philadelphia host committee for the convention, at Philadelphia International Airport's Terminal A-East.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Paper Paging Through History By Mark Kurlansky W.W. Norton. 416 pp. $27.95. Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mark Kurlansky has created a niche writing about things that we take for granted. Cod , his briny and brainy "biography of the fish that changed the world," won a James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing in 1999. He has written about salt and oysters and frozen food, all with a flair that can make the mundane mesmerizing.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
The Rev. John Thomas Denny, 58, of Villanova, an Augustinian friar, priest, and educator on the Main Line, died Monday, June 20, of complications from cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Father Denny was born in Bryn Mawr, one of eight children of Joseph G. and Mary K. Schubert Denny. He graduated from Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill, and earned a bachelor's degree in history from Boston College. Although he initially entered the Augustinian Order in Lawrence, Mass., in August 1980, he withdrew the following March and went to work as a real estate agent and teacher.
SPORTS
June 23, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
FOR THE FIRST time since 1996, the Sixers will be making the opening pick of the NBA draft when they tab their selection on Thursday. This was part of former general manager Sam Hinkie's plan, but now it is being overseen by Bryan Colangelo, who was brought in as president of basketball operations in April - shortly after Hinkie resigned his post amid speculation his role was going to be diminished. Colangelo, who turned 51 earlier this month, will be commanding his 19th draft; he was the general manager in Phoenix for 11 seasons and held the same role for the Toronto Raptors for another seven.
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