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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the months before his death, the Rev. James A. Benson kept working on exhibits for his museum in Lawnside. "He was sick in the hospital, cutting things out of the newspaper and using the nurses' tape," Benson's widow, Ellen, recalls. "He was always asking, 'What's going on at the museum?' " A retired Lawnside postmaster, she's grateful that her husband - who was 81 when he died of leukemia Dec. 8 - doesn't have to hear the answer to his frequent question. The Benson History Museum he founded, owned, and operated (at no charge to visitors)
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, Erin Bernard was walking past a row of food trucks near Temple University when inspiration struck. "I was like, 'Wouldn't it be great if there was a museum on a truck?' " said Bernard, a graduate student in public history. And not just one that showed up at your doorstep - "but that you helped make what was on it?" With that one big idea - and lots of legwork - Bernard created the Philadelphia Public History Truck, a - ahem - vehicle for documenting the untold stories of Philadelphia residents and communities, one neighborhood at a time.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* TURN. 9 p.m. Sunday, AMC. * SILICON VALLEY. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO. * VEEP. 10:30 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   AMC, fresh off another record-breaking season finale of "The Walking Dead" and a week away from the Season 7 launch of "Mad Men," splits the considerable difference between zombies and '60s admen on Sunday with "Turn," a historical drama about a group of men and women who spied for George Washington during the Revolutionary War....
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
NBA infamy is hovering over the 76ers like a buzzard eying a carcass. A loss to the Detroit Pistons on Saturday at Wells Fargo Center would mark their 27th straight loss. That would give them the record for consecutive losses by a U.S. professional team. Based on this season's previous matchups with Detroit (26-45), a loss appears unavoidable for the Sixers (15-57). Just don't tell that to Thaddeus Young. "I always felt like we can go into any game and beat anybody on any given night," the Sixers power forward said.
REAL_ESTATE
March 17, 2014 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
The trio of Colonials in Queen Village is as charming as a storybook illustration. Indeed, the transformation of the once-tumbledown dwellings is a family saga. Ann Foringer now lives in one of the end houses with husband Scott and daughter, Mai, 17. Previously, the structure was occupied by Ann's parents, Homer and Helen Rhule, who bought it in the mid-1980s. "My father was offered a job in Center City, and my parents decided to relocate" from Westfield, N.J., Ann said. "Mother wanted to restore a house - the older the better.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
For nearly a decade, the complaints against Philadelphia Police Officer Kevin Corcoran just kept coming. There's one for allegedly entering a man's house in South Philadelphia without permission, and breaking his face with punches and kicks. There's another for allegedly slamming a man headfirst into a newspaper box in Old City, beating him bloody after the Phillies' World Series parade. The nine-year veteran has been sued four times for excessive force - with the city twice settling for undisclosed amounts.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Before his 2005 move to Charlottesville, Va., where he died Monday, Feb. 3, at age 90, University of Pennsylvania professor Thomas P. Hughes was a familiar presence in Chestnut Hill, bicycling to and from the early service at the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, or buying crackers and cheese for the intimate gatherings of neighbors and Penn colleagues he hosted at his house on Millman Street. It wasn't just any house. Dr. Hughes' home was that icon of modern architecture known as "Mother's House," designed by Robert Venturi for his mother, Vanna.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Anyone looking for a quick overview of jazz history could take a crash course simply by checking out a few performances in Philly this weekend. Around the city, modern jazz artists are paying homage to a groundbreaking festival and some of the music's most pioneering artists, glancing back while moving determinedly forward. Saturday night at the Painted Bride Art Center, Philadelphia saxophonist and bandleader Bobby Zankel kicks off his three-night "Still the New Thing" festival with a concert celebrating his mentor, Cecil Taylor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
IF YOU'RE the kid of Rosie O'Donnell , what's the best way to piss off your left-leaning, pacifist, no-holds-barred mama? Enroll in Valley Forge Military Academy, of course. O'Donnell's 18-year-old son, Parker , has been a student at the school since 2011, and was recently accepted to the Citadel. "It's the only way he can rebel. If he was getting a tattoo, I would say, 'Whatever, I have four.' 'Want to ride a motorcycle? I can too.' Whatever, I'm gay. I don't care," O'Donnell said, adding that she's proud of her eldest.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOORESTOWN For weeks, the students of Moorestown High School had read about the American Civil War in books. They completed homework assignments and took quizzes. But on Friday, the war came to them in a more personal way - through the uniforms, swords, letters, images, and diaries of Moorestown residents who actually fought it. The Historical Society of Moorestown brought its entire exhibit on "Moorestown During the Civil War" from its headquarters at the Smith-Cadbury Mansion to the school.
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