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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE, N.J. - There is a cycle of inevitability in nature - of birth, growth, evolution, and, eventually, death - that hasn't escaped the eye of Pat Witt. Renowned for capturing the beauty of the changing seasons in the swampy bogs of South Jersey, Witt, 88, is beloved for teaching four generations of children and adults to look deep beyond the mechanics of painting and drawing. Thousands of students have passed through the doors of her Barn Studio of Art since she opened it in 1962, a place that has been called a sanctuary for creativity on the bottom floor of a converted hay barn and florist shop in a wooded glen off Whitaker Avenue.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WALL, N.J. - The five-story satellite dish made history nearly six decades ago, early in America's space race with the Soviet Union. It tracked the first U.S. space launch, Explorer 1, that year, and received the first hurricane data from the TIROS 1 satellite in 1960. Then the dish was mothballed in the late 1970s as more modern equipment came into use, and eventually was relegated to the status of science relic, part of the museum collection of the InfoAge Science Center at Camp Evans, a historic former Army Signal Corps center in Monmouth County.
SPORTS
February 13, 2015
THE EAGLES found themselves being widely ridiculed on social media yesterday when a number of people and media outlets, including TMZ and Deadspin, noticed that the 2015 team calendar features a photo of wideout Riley Cooper illustrating February. February is Black History Month. Cooper, of course, made headlines in the summer of 2013 when video footage surfaced of him using the "N-word" during a dispute at a Kenny Chesney concert. He ended up apologizing to fans and teammates. "We do not oversee the production of the annual team calendar," the Eagles said in a statement released yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Many events will mark this year's 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. One of the most poignant occurred last month, when Holocaust survivors returned to Poland to commemorate their release from the Auschwitz concentration camp. The horrors they suffered are recounted in a new HBO documentary, Night Will Fall , which, like Selma, the theatrical film depicting a seminal moment in the civil rights movement, should be seen by a much wider audience. Night Will Fall includes footage of Holocaust victims being freed and details the depravities of their Nazi captors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 39 years ago that President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized February as Black History Month "to honor the too-often-neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history. " The month's mandate since then has broadened to encompass all elements of diaspora, heritage, issues, and achievement. The region has launched a month of art and exhibitions, theater, film, and events that celebrate and illuminate black history past, present, and future.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
PHILADELPHIA real-estate developer Shawn Bullard is the first black man to court love on television whose name is not Flavor Flav . Bullard is the focus of "Match Made in Heaven," WeTV's foray into the reality love game, premiering Wednesday at 8 p.m. The twist is that he'll get romantic input from Indianapolis Colts spiritual adviser Pastor Ken Johnson and his mother, Maggie Bullard . Bullard's small place in television history...
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands flock to Western Pennsylvania each year for a spectacle involving top hats and a furry celebrity - a tradition that forecasts whether to brace for more weeks of bitter cold, or instead expect spring's relief. But in one Gloucester County town, Groundhog Day doubles as a chance to taste a slice of local history. And some sausage. The Harrison Township Historical Society's Ground Hog Day Dinner is a revival of a town tradition once hosted by a local church. Members of Richwood United Methodist Church men's Bible class held the dinner early in the 1900s on every Groundhog Day in their farming community, which included many German families.
SPORTS
January 21, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Penn women's basketball coach Mike McLaughlin originally didn't think his Quakers had a shot at the player he now describes as a game-changer for his defending Ivy League champions. Life works that way sometimes. It's the surprises that can change everything. Sydney Stipanovich, now a sophomore at Penn, was a big-time high school center in St. Louis. Missouri offered her a scholarship early. Her father had gone to Missouri, and her older brother. Her sister now goes there. Her uncle Steve was a star player there before he became the second pick of the 1983 NBA draft.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Even as a toddler, Timothy Denevi showed signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. By sixth grade, his angry tantrums had turned into physical fights with schoolmates. ADHD was not only affecting his mood, but threatening to compromise his academic record. But about 20 years later, Denevi has overcome his symptoms. He graduated from the University of Iowa with an M.F.A. degree in nonfiction and is now a visiting writer at George Mason University. "I'm very lucky," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I'm a 32-year-old woman. I met a guy who on our first date told me had prostate cancer, but that doctors had operated on him and he was now cancer free. We had an OK time and he asked me out again. My friend said I shouldn't go out with him because of his medical history. What do you think?   Mia: Sorry, girlfriend, but you're not giving us enough information. Are you saying you're squeamish just because he had cancer? Or are you concerned about his ability to father children, or even just get and maintain an erection?
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