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NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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SPORTS
September 17, 2014 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
THE PROLIFERATION of networks has watered down the experience of playing prime-time games. For years, there was "Monday Night Football" and nothing else. No Sunday night games, no Saturday playoff games and certainly no Thursday night games. Chip Kelly coached his 19th game for the Birds last night. Counting last year's postseason loss to the Saints, this will be his sixth game in prime time. From 1982-87, the Eagles did not appear on prime time even once - mostly because the team wasn't very good.
REAL_ESTATE
September 7, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Real estate developer and certified public accountant Tom Conway bought what he thought was an ordinary house at Holland and Spring Avenues in Ardmore, close to Haverford College. He figured he would renovate the house and perhaps lease it to students. A Glen Mills native, Conway already owned a half-dozen income properties in Manayunk and thought this section of Ardmore was up and coming. Turned out that previous owners were Russell L. and Cleopatra Nelson, who lived there for several decades.
SPORTS
September 5, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
WHEN YOU'RE ranked fifth in the preseason, you don't expect to drop your first two games. But that's what happened to Villanova a year ago. The Wildcats lost at FBS Boston College, where they could have won, and at Fordham, which ended up getting to the second round of the FCS playoffs. And just like that, they were paddling upstream. After winning their next four, which included a win at No. 3 Towson, the eventual national runnerup, injuries and a bear of a schedule caught up with them and they ended up 6-5. It didn't matter that three of the losses were by a combined six points.
NEWS
September 5, 2014
OFTEN, when I write something that is in the vaguest of terms controversial (as in, we shouldn't change the names of our local train stations), I'll get at least a few emails telling me to consider another "career. " There is the presumption that I'm a journalist, and not a very good one at that. One recent reader took umbrage at a column I wrote on immigration and sent me a not-so-veiled threat. Others have used every four-letter word in their rich vocabularies to tell me how much I'm appreciated.
NEWS
September 3, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a century after a Quaker florist spread spores he imported from England beneath greenhouse benches and sparked mushroom farming in southern Chester County, cultivation of the fertile fungi is a $500 million industry that still provides jobs for hard-working immigrants. Next weekend, nearly 100,000 visitors are expected to flock to Kennett Square, a 1-square-mile borough, for its annual festival celebrating the self-declared Mushroom Capital of the World. "Nobody grows as many mushrooms as us in a concentrated area," said festival coordinator Kathi Lafferty, whose Kennett gift shop, the Mushroom Cap, offers T-shirts emblazoned: "Shiitake Happens.
REAL_ESTATE
August 31, 2014 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
On a Saturday afternoon two years ago, Matt Capucini navigated his 33-foot Formula through Ventnor Heights' back bays, where Shore life is good. From Memorial Day through the warmth of autumn, there's a steady flow of action: swimming, kayaking, paddleboarding, plus parties spilling onto large decks. It was exactly what Capucini and his life partner, Jimmy Ruiz, were looking for. They had traveled from their vacation home in Rehoboth Beach to see a bayfront property for sale.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Deborah Broadnax was starting her course in radio, television and film at Temple University, her professor made a disheartening prediction. Looking around the lecture hall, professor Norman Felsenthal said that out of more than 100 students, "only three of you will actually work in television news. " Deborah said to herself, "Well, I'm going to be one of the three. " And she was. She worked in various capacities in TV news for Fox 29 and KYW Channel 3 for several years before moving into academia for another of her numerous careers.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
TALKING TAXES can be taxing, especially when running for office. Perhaps you recall what turned out to be troublesome tax-talk by Democrat Walter Mondale and Republican George H.W. Bush. Well, we've got similar situations in Pennsylvania's race for governor. Gov. Corbett last week told the Associated Press that he kept the no-new-taxes pledge he signed as a 2010 candidate. Actually, he said, "I'm living up to my pledge the best I can. " Technically, true. Then again, he's presumably doing everything the best he can, which is why he's considered to be the most vulnerable incumbent governor in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
On the day Mark Segal saw the house in Society Hill, he knew instantly that he would buy it - and did, that very day. Few real estate deals happen that way, but this was back in 1994, and Segal, founder and publisher of the Philadelphia Gay News and a national leader in the gay rights/LGBT movement, had a life filled with drama and constant challenge. Segal admittedly needed a sanctuary, and he instantly found it in the 1970s, three-story house with a contemporary look and feel. "Every time I walk into the den, I feel myself decompressing," said Segal, who shares the house with his husband, Jason Villemez.
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