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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
SPORTS
July 9, 2012
For Phillies fans in the ill-fated 1964 season, it was easy to believe New York's new Shea Stadium was a magical place. On June 21, 1964, Phils ace Jim Bunning pitched the first perfect game by a National League hurler since 1880. And 16 days later, on July 7, rightfielder Johnny Callison nailed a two-out, ninth-inning three-run home run in the All-Star Game against Red Sox super-closer Dick "The Monster" Raditz. It remains the only walk-off homer in All-Star Game history. But, as the Daily News' Stan Hochman wrote, it wasn't Callison's style to boast.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
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SPORTS
July 18, 2014
PHILADELPHIA STARS, 1983-84 Here is a look at the 2 years the Stars played in Philadelphia: 1983 About the Stars (15-3): Coached by Jim Mora after George Perles unexpectedly bolted for the Michigan State job just before the season started . . . Running back Kelvin Bryant was the league MVP, but it was coordinator Vince Tobin's "Doghouse Defense" that led the way in the regular season. Philadelphia allowed less than 12 points per game during the regular season (but 62 in their two playoff games . . . Played at Veterans Stadium where they averaged 18,650 in attendance . . . Overcame seven turnovers and a 21-point deficit with 12 minutes left to stun Chicago in overtime of a playoff game at the Vet. The game was terrific.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just across from the Liberty Bell, another homage to America's roots opened Tuesday afternoon: a beer garden highlighting the country's own brews. Independence Beer Garden, located on the west side of Independence Mall at the foot of the Dow Chemical building, served its first glass just before 4 p.m. Michael Schulson, a 41-year-old chef who also owns Philadelphia's Sampan restaurant, always wanted to open a beer garden. Now, after a few hiccups that delayed the opening, he finally has. With 20 American beers on tap, the "garden" is big - approximately 22,000 square feet.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IN ENGLAND, only two courses are older than Royal Liverpool. Or Hoylake, as it's better known for the seaside town that surrounds it. The club as founded in 1869 and 28 years later hosted the first of what this week will be a dozen Open Championships, as they simply call it everywhere outside the United States. In the modern rotation, only St. Andrews (28), Muirfield (16) and Royal Troon (14) have been the venue more often. It was taken out of the rotation after 1967 not because of the course but rather the notion that it could no longer cope with the logistical issues, such as parking and concession space.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
VICE PRESIDENT Joe Biden celebrated America's 238th birthday at Independence Hall, where he considered the history and future of the nation's freedoms. Speaking to an enthusiastic crowd that gathered yesterday despite an overcast sky and drizzling rain, Biden spoke of the work the Founding Fathers did in Philadelphia in 1776. The event, part of the Wawa Welcome America Festival, focused not just on the signing of the Declaration of Independence but also on the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 1954 that desegregated schools and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dania Sargenc often joked that the neon sign above Benash Liquor Store, with its bold yellow lettering, rusty red background, and arrow pointing toward the door, would one day be hers. The sign went up in 1948, when her uncle opened the store along Route 38 in Cherry Hill. Soon her father worked there, and even through ownership changes during the next 66 years, the sign remained. Then, last week, it came crashing down. What was one man's misfortune - accidentally toppling the sign with a red pickup truck - was Sargenc's chance to reclaim a part of her family's history.
TRAVEL
June 30, 2014 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
UMIKOA, Hawaii - We begin on a rutted, red-dirt trail in this tiny hamlet populated by ranch hands and their families, some 3,500 feet up Mauna Kea, the dormant volcano that - measuring 31,100 feet from its oceanic base to the top - is the world's tallest mountain. Guide Richard Lindberg is driving a taxi-yellow Kawasaki Terra-X, an all-terrain vehicle that looks like a golf cart on steroids. He stops at a gatehouse, gets out and signs a clipboard. "This way if we don't come back, they'll come looking for us," he explains.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
The stock market keeps stretching to new highs. Is it a bubble? And if it is, when will it burst? Bubbles don't announce themselves clearly, so a look back at the history of bubbles is instructive. Booms, burst bubbles , crashes, and other economic upheavals have been going on forever. Harvard Business School offers a collection of case studies on U.S. busts back to the Panic of 1837 and including the famous stock-market bubble of 1925-29 that preceded the Great Depression. It also details the less-well-known real estate bubble that came just before that 1920s market boom and saw empty building lots in Miami being sold 10 times per day. If we only had learned . . . "Whatever else you might say about today's stock market, it is nowhere near as overheated as it was 14 years ago," Mark Hulbert wrote in this MarketWatch post in April, where he compared the market this year with the tech bust of spring 2000.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Dan Snyder has been forced to circle the wagons in his greedy defense of the controversial Washington Redskins trademark. And few outside of Cleveland would be surprised, or dismayed, if the Indians' overtly racist logo - the toothy Chief Wahoo - soon vanished. The supporters of these anachronistic sporting symbols see them as worthy, innocent, and long-standing traditions. But to believe that, you've got to overlook the disturbing history from which they arose. There was a time in American sports, predominantly in early 20th-century baseball, when deformed or degraded mascots were the norm.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
ISSUE | COMMUNITY Studying history where it happened We should all be ashamed of the callous and cavalier attitude taken by some Haddon Heights residents who objected to the installation of memorial plaques to enslaved African Americans ("Slavery markers stir a local debate," June 10). According to Mayor Ed Forte, "The slavery issue seems to have upset people. " Forte also suggests that a library might be a more fitting place to acknowledge this history. But I humbly submit that the American people are not willing to move the Martin Luther King Jr. statue or the Lincoln Memorial or Philadelphia's President's House from their historic locations.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
ISSUE | HISTORY With cramming, decades can get lost As a former university professor of education, I agree that many students are ignorant of historical facts - but it's not because children don't study history ("Well-informed citizenry must know history," June 6). In fact, students study too much history at any one time and, as a result, don't learn or remember much. It would be better to teach history over several years, with each segment devoted to building an understanding of key ideas, making personal and emotional connections, and concentrating on key facts.
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