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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The messages the company received were the usual sort. A few impatient customers asked the company to speed up their orders. One paid off a bill. Another apologized for not having the money just yet. One message demanded the company pay money it owed. What makes the messages unusual - and precious - are the dates on the letters, 1834, and to whom they were addressed, the family of Rebecca Lukens, the nation's first female industrialist. "We're all aquiver because this [letter]
SPORTS
March 21, 2015 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Familiar foes Martin Luther King and Roman Catholic are set to square off in the PIAA Class AAAA boys' basketball final, with the winner making history. The Cahillites have beaten the Cougars in the District 12 final three straight times. But King barely fell short of the crown the last two times, falling by 58-55 last year and 58-57 last month. "We just have to make a few more plays," said King's third-year coach, Sean Colson. "I don't think much separates the teams. " With considerably more at stake this time, Roman (28-2)
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Introduced as interior designer for the 152-room SLS LUX Philadelphia Hotel, the iconic Phillipe Starck found it easy to strike the right chord with his audience of city movers and shakers. Turning to Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, the Frenchman thanked the recording impresarios for giving him "the kind of music that has allowed me to make good projects. " "This is my opportunity," Starck said of his first Philadelphia project, "to be able to pay my debt to you and your music," to which he listens as he designs.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The worn and delicate newspaper under careful watch inside Deptford Township's municipal building - an inked record that has survived since the presidency of George Washington - does not mention the Gloucester County town. Yet those who know the events of Jan. 9, 1793, understand that a small story tucked inside, about a "majestic" hot-air balloon flight, has Deptford written all over it. On that day 222 years ago, Frenchman Jean-Pierre Blanchard left Philadelphia for the sky in a spectacle that attracted the nation's first commander-in-chief and future Presidents John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrons of the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia founded the historic school in the mid-19th century so their students would be prepared for the day when equality arrived. But graduate Octavius V. Catto couldn't wait that long. The civil rights hero took what he learned at the school that would become Cheyney University and used it to speed up the process. So did many of his classmates - but with much less attention paid to them. A new digital history project at Villanova University aims to change that.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Shanghai, Qingjia Edward Wang never thought he would one day write a book about chopsticks. To him, chopsticks were just eating utensils. But when Wang, now a history professor at Rowan University, was teaching his then-5-year-old son, Maxwell, how to use chopsticks, he decided to look for information about them. To his surprise, little was available in English. Wang, whose research focuses primarily on historiography, the study of how history is written, decided the topic was worth pursuing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The songs that flügelhornist Hugh Masekela and singer-guitarist Vusi Mahlasela performed at the Annenberg Center on Saturday night were the sound track to the apartheid era, and thus dealt with grim themes: racial segregation, violence, imprisonment, and struggle. But the mood these two South African icons conjured was buoyant and celebratory, a vivid illustration of the role music played in lifting the spirits of South Africans during decades of oppression. The lighthearted mood could be summed up in Mahlasela's gallows humor, as he introduced a "very short song" called "Jailbreak," written by a friend during his prison term - then proceeded to scrape the strings of his guitar to simulate a sawing sound.
TRAVEL
February 23, 2015 | By Robert Carden, For The Inquirer
DUBLIN, Ireland - In town for a few days, and not looking for roots or relatives, I'm here for the whiskey and beer. I am, however, accompanied by an intellectually curious and well-bred woman who is my wife, along with our college-age kids. And while she's a pretty good sport, having indulged most of my bad habits for more than 20 years, asking her to spend her only time in Dublin holed up in saloons is a bit much. So to make the trip work, I had to steel up and at least try to generate a healthy interest in museums, churches, and the like.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE, N.J. - There is a cycle of inevitability in nature - of birth, growth, evolution, and, eventually, death - that hasn't escaped the eye of Pat Witt. Renowned for capturing the beauty of the changing seasons in the swampy bogs of South Jersey, Witt, 88, is beloved for teaching four generations of children and adults to look deep beyond the mechanics of painting and drawing. Thousands of students have passed through the doors of her Barn Studio of Art since she opened it in 1962, a place that has been called a sanctuary for creativity on the bottom floor of a converted hay barn and florist shop in a wooded glen off Whitaker Avenue.
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