CollectionsHistory
IN THE NEWS

History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2016
Rakia Reynolds,37 President and founder of Skai Blue Media Growing up, I attended Catholic school, which meant I learned about the Stations of the Cross, catechism and Martin Luther (not the "King"). We knelt and prayed and practiced our handwriting on a regular basis, but comprehensive history was not factored into our seven-hour school days. Black history, in particular, was never a part of the curriculum. However, I was fortunate to have parents who knew the importance of introducing my sisters and me to great Black leaders.
NEWS
February 2, 2016
Black History Month, celebrated each February, routinely draws attention from legislative bodies at all levels. Why, just last week the state House unanimously passed a resolution in recognition of Black History Month, honoring Army Brig. Gen. Charles Hamilton, an African American. Never mind that he's not a historical figure but is very much alive at the Philadelphia Navy Yard as Defense Logistics Agency troop support commander. Still a nice gesture, one of many such measures passed each year.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
Sofiya BallinĀ is an Inquirer staff writer I learned the most about black history in whispered tones while my mother braided my hair, after school when my father listened to talk radio, as my grandmother grated coconut, and at the dinner table set with shades of brown and opinion. In those moments I learned of the rise and destruction of Black Wall Street, the inhumanity of the Tuskegee Experiment, the tales of Angola's Queen Nzinga, the triumph of Queen Nanny of the Jamaican Maroons, and the Haitian revolution.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
When David P. Silverman translated mystical writings on the side of a 4,000-year-old Egyptian coffin recently, he discovered a plea to the earth god, Geb. The long-ago writer sought protection for the coffin's inhabitant, a district governor named Ahanakht. But these days, the words could just as easily mean protection from the trembling earth next door. University City is the site of yet another construction project. This time, it's the demolition of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's Penn Tower complex, in order to make way for a new patient pavilion.
NEWS
January 26, 2016
IT IS NOT so much that the Eagles learned something from Sunday's NFL championship games. They were another affirmation of what the Eagles already knew. The absolute necessity of having a franchise-level quarterback is no secret. It is the most important individual position in any team sport. A legendary quarterback like Tom Brady can establish a dynasty. If an all-world talent like Cam Newton puts it all together, a mediocre team like the Carolina Panthers can register the best regular-season record in the league.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | BY BONNIE L. COOK, Staff Writer
ROBERT A. KLINGER, 70, of Broomall, a chemist and amateur historian, died Monday, Jan. 18, of respiratory failure at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Born to Blanche and Robert Klinger in Norristown, he graduated from Springfield High School in Delaware County in 1963, and later enrolled in Delaware Valley College in Doylestown. He served in the Navy aboard the Du Pont, a destroyer, during the Vietnam War. After his military service, he enrolled at Widener University. He graduated with honors in chemistry and biology.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | BY JENICE M. ARMSTRONG, Staff Writer
I FOUND MYSELF reflecting last week on the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. My husband and I were driving home from Florida and we had made a detour to Birmingham, Ala., a place neither of us knew much about. We were fresh off a relaxing 11-day Caribbean cruise and not at all looking for a history lesson but found ourselves immersed in one as we climbed the steps to the 16th Street Baptist Church, known worldwide for the heinous bombing by the Ku Klux Klan that killed four little black girls back in 1963.
NEWS
January 19, 2016
By Peter Binzen Fifty-one years ago, the Evening Bulletin hired a young black reporter from NBC-TV in Philadelphia for its city staff. The Bulletin had been founded nearly a century earlier, but Claude Lewis was just the second African American reporter to join its newsroom. Lewis started as a general assignment reporter, but, in 1967, George R. Packard, the Bulletin's executive editor, made him a columnist. No Philadelphia daily paper had ever published regular columns by a journalist of color.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, STAFF TV CRITIC
When Josh Radnor makes his first appearance Sunday as a Civil War surgeon in PBS's new drama, Mercy Street , he will be trying to take down more than a gun-waving patient. At 10 p.m. on WHYY-TV12, viewers will hear, "Soldier, this is a place of peace and healing, not a place for guns," but what some may see, at least at first, is Radnor's How I Met Your Mother character, Ted Mosby, in an unironic beard and mustache, playing dress-up. They should give him time. It's not easy being an American in a PBS drama.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|