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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's no reason to beat around the bush: Texas Rising , History's five-part mini-series about the Texas Revolution, has to be one of the strangest, most idiosyncratic dramas on TV since Twin Peaks . An odd hybrid between the western and the historical saga, the dramatic and the comedic, Texas Rising is about the bloody war waged in 1835 and 1836 by Texians (as they referred to themselves) to free the territory from the Mexican Empire. Richly textured and enjoyable if wildly uneven, the star-studded series tries to marry the hard-nosed, brutally violent realism of modern TV     to an antique - some would say antiquated - aesthetic of genteel mannerisms and off-the-wall humor prevalent during the first golden age of TV in the 1950s and '60s.
SPORTS
May 22, 2015 | John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
FROM A HISTORICAL perspective, little is unusual about the lacrosse national semifinal matchup between the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University tomorrow at Lincoln Financial Field. Since they first met in 1895, the Terps and Blue Jays have played more than 100 times, and the rivalry between the Maryland institutions is widely considered the greatest in collegiate lacrosse. Still, something is unique about this Hopkins/Maryland meeting - part of this weekend' NCAA Division I Lacrosse Final Four - and it could be the most important event for lacrosse in decades.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Priscilla Ferguson Clement, 73, of Wallingford, a history professor at Pennsylvania State University, died Wednesday, May 6, of pancreatic cancer at her home. Born in Long Beach, Calif., she graduated from Stanford University in 1964 with a degree in history. That same year she married John Stokes Clement 3d. After moving to Pennsylvania, she began teaching at Penn State Delaware County and cofounded a women's studies program for that campus. In 1977, Dr. Clement completed a doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine being given another human being as your 11th birthday present, as happens to Sarah, the heroine of Sue Monk Kidd's 2014 best-seller, The Invention of Wings . Kidd's fact-based story is about the lives of famed early 19th-century Quaker abolitionist Sarah Grimké and the person she was gifted, her maidservant Handful, an 11-year-old born into slavery. The novel vividly brings to life an era when such an event seemed normal; when slavery was considered natural, even righteous.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During summers in the 1960s, William J. Jordan took a break from teaching American history to South Jersey high school students and taught Revolutionary history to tourists in Philadelphia. The National Park Service gave him its uniform, its distinctive flat-brimmed hat, anointed him a seasonal park ranger, and assigned him to tours of Independence National Historical Park. "I know he loved that time in history," daughter Karen Jordan said. "He gave us all copies of the Constitution, his children," she said.
NEWS
April 29, 2015
LAST WEEK was bad for Holocaust deniers. Oskar Groening, the "accountant of Auschwitz," testified he had personally seen up to 1.5 million Jews "murdered in Auschwitz. I was there," he said. Elsewhere, Thursday marked the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, carried out against Armenians (Christians) by someone. Who? Turkey (Muslims) will get mad if I say. Earlier this month, Pope Francis rattled Turkey's cage when he called the slaughter "the first genocide of the 20th century.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
OPPORTUNITIES to be a part of historic events in Philadelphia like the Continental Congress of 1776 and Live Aid have long gone by, but area residents can be a part of the city's next historic chapter by volunteering for the World Meeting of Families and Pope Francis' visit this fall. "I finally have an answer to the question I get asked every day: 'How can I help?' " said Donna Crilley Farrell, executive director of the WMOF. "The answer is volunteer. " At a news conference at the Pennsylvania Convention Center yesterday announcing the opening of volunteer registration, WMOF organizers said they're seeking 10,000 volunteers for more than 100 events from Sept.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Betty Organt, For The Inquirer
As a teacher of history and a child of the Cold War period, I was always fascinated with the events that led to the U.S. embargo against Cuba. The island nation, the Caribbean's largest, was the "forbidden fruit" of travel, which only heightened my desire to visit it. When I learned about the people-to-people tours that allowed travellers to go to Cuba to see what the Cuban government wanted them to see, I quickly made a reservation. After a briefing on what to expect, what not to expect (toilet seats in most places)
SPORTS
April 19, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On the days, separated by seven months, that they promoted Craig Berube to head coach and Ron Hextall to general manager, the Flyers framed each announcement in the manner in which they conduct so much of their daily business - with a reverence for their past that bordered on the pathological. Berube and Hextall had been teammates with the Flyers a generation earlier, and both had worked for the organization after their playing careers had ended. Ed Snider, the Flyers' team chairman, and Paul Holmgren, the team's president, flanked Berube at the first news conference and Hextall at the second, and the stories and anecdotes from the old days flowed like foamy Molson from a just-tapped keg. That was the nostalgic veneer and implicit message of each image: that Chief and Hexy were Flyers once and Flyers forever, and they would stay true to the organization's core principles and practices.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In her book The Battle of Versailles , Robin Givhan whisks readers back to an electric night in 1973 when five emerging American fashion designers bested their French counterparts . The 306-page tome, published by Flatiron Books, recounts how the industry's then-underdogs - Oscar de la Renta, Anne Klein, Bill Blass, Stephen Burrows, and Roy Halston Frowick (simply known as Halston) - surprisingly triumphed in a fashion show competition and fund-raiser that would benefit the crumbling Versailles palace.
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