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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | Robert P. George
Robert P. George is the McCormick professor of jurisprudence at Princeton University.  Early in 1998, as the Clinton White House was trying to discredit Monica Lewinsky, a rumor began to circulate that Lewinsky had in her possession conclusive evidence of her affair with Bill Clinton - a stained blue dress. Clinton propagandists were initially terrified. Proof that the president had carried on a sordid affair with a 21-year-old White House intern would not only destroy their campaign to depict Lewinsky as a liar, a fantasist, even a stalker; it could bring down Clinton's presidency.
SPORTS
September 15, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On Oct. 9, 2010, in the fourth quarter of Vanderbilt's 52-6 victory over Eastern Michigan, Jordan Matthews caught a pass from a quarterback named Jared Funk. It went for 35 yards, and it was the first of Matthews' 262 receptions at Vanderbilt - the most of any player in Southeastern Conference history. On Sunday, in the fourth quarter of the Eagles' 29-10 victory over the Browns, Matthews caught a pass from a quarterback named Carson Wentz. It went for 16 yards, and it was the latest of Matthews' 159 receptions with the Eagles - the most of any player through 33 games in franchise history.
SPORTS
September 10, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Facts and Figures The teams played every year from 1900 through 1931, then from 1935 through 1992. From 1903 through 1970, all but six games were played in Pittsburgh, counting Pitt Stadium and Forbes Field. The teams also met for three straight years at Three Rivers Stadium from 1974 through 1976. Pitt won 14 straight games from 1922 through 1938. Starting that run in 1913, the Panthers held a 20-1-2 record in that period over Penn State. Penn State's longest winning streak in the series is 10, 1966 through 1975.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Richard R. Beeman, 74, a University of Pennsylvania historian and a trustee of the National Constitution Center, who revered America's founding document and spent decades teaching its creation and complexities, died Monday, Sept. 5, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Beeman, of Moylan, was the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History at Penn, where he was a faculty member for 43 years. "It has been my great privilege during those years to teach thousands of bright Penn undergraduates and graduate students the subject I love - the history of the American Revolution and Constitution," Dr. Beeman wrote on his website.
SPORTS
September 7, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
YOU GOT THE idea that the conversation was not a long one, when Doug Pederson called Chase Daniel to tell him Sam Bradford had been traded, but that this did not mean Daniel would become the Eagles' starting quarterback. Pederson didn't bring up 1999, he said - that being the year Andy Reid brought Pederson to Philadelphia to be his starting QB until Donovan McNabb was ready. Back then, Pederson was looking to prove he could be somebody's long-term starter, use the year as a platform to make his case with another team, and he thought he'd get more than nine games to do that.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
As Philadelphians honor the contributions and achievements of the American worker on Labor Day, consider the story of the International Typographical Union, one of the oldest such organizations in the country. Many early settlers counted the new world's lack of the printed word as a benefit. "I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing. . . . God keep us from both," professed William Berkeley, a colonial governor, in 1671. For these logophobes, Philadelphia was no respite.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
These days, we take it for granted that a big outdoor show such as this weekend's Made in America Festival or an arena spectacle such as Barbra Streisand's recent "The Music . . . The Mem'ries . . . The Magic" will land with lots of high-tech eye candy. Think huge video close-up of the artists visible a half a mile away, plus abstract art flashed on LED screens. And woe to the flimsy pop darling or the electronic dance music DJ if the video system crashes. The "excitement" would deflate faster than a popped party balloon.
SPORTS
September 2, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
When Temple kicks off its football season Friday at Lincoln Financial Field against Army, the opponent will provide a nostalgic moment for fourth-year head coach Matt Rhule and fourth-year starting quarterback Phillip Walker. It was Army that provided the first win for both coach and quarterback. The Owls were 0-6 entering a home game on Oct. 19, 2013. Like any first-year coach, Rhule was frustrated by the losing. He made several changes to his lineup. "We started putting in the young players, pulling out their redshirts and said, 'If we are going to lose, let's lose with kids who are going to listen to us,' " Rhule recalled this week.
NEWS
August 30, 2016
By Grant Calder What figures in American history do you find the most appealing and why? That's the first question I'm going to ask my 11th-grade American history students this year. We will share our lists and talk about where and why we overlap, or don't. Mine will include four people who lived in Philadelphia for some or all of their lives: James Forten, Sarah Grimke, Thomas Paine, and Ben Franklin. The lists will reveal much about us individually, about our era, and about how our historical views are powerfully shaped by the present.
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
A cache of 15,000 photographic negatives that nearly got tossed into the trash is offering Cinnaminson and its police department fresh pictures of a largely forgotten past. Who knew that routine photos of fender-benders, burglaries, and men in blue on their beats during the late 1940s through the mid-1970s could illustrate the evolution of a once-rural South Jersey suburb? Paul M. Seymour, who saved the black-and-white negatives and is making images from them, knew. So did his fellow township police officer, Thomas Lillagore, 49. He utilized more than a dozen of the photos to finish a job his late father started.
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