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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tucked into the usual Broadway Playbill for the new hit Shuffle Along at the Music Box Theatre is something that's not the typical size or color: a sepia replica of the show's original 1921 program from the long-demolished 63rd Street Music Hall, evidence of the distant world from which the show comes. Known as the first African American megahit, the 1921 version of Shuffle Along made the careers of songwriters Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle and helped launch Florence Mills, Adelaide Hall, and Josephine Baker.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
LaRose By Louise Erdrich Harper. 384 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Michael Broida Out hunting along the blurred line of reservation land in rural North Dakota, Landreaux takes aim at a buck. By the time he realizes his mistake, it is too late: He has mistakenly killed Dusty, his neighbor's son. Landreaux and his wife, Emmaline, take an old form of justice to their neighbors, Peter and Nola, who is Emmaline's half-sister: "Our son will be your son now. " It is the giving of this boy, LaRose, that forms the solemn linchpin of Louise Erdrich's new novel, LaRose . The tragedy that connects these two families is at once singular and deeply historical, as Erdrich weaves in the history of a land and an Ojibwe people at once divided by tragedy yet unified in their love and adoration for the boy LaRose.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Over the roar of a backhoe and the shriek of power tools, archaeologist Rebecca Yamin stood on the edge of a dusty pit and examined what was left of the western wall of the Van Dyke Building, which stood at Third and Chestnut Streets in the middle of the 19th century. It was the last piece of a puzzle in four dimensions - mapping the site of the Museum of the American Revolution over more than 250 years. "The philosophy behind this work is, if you're going to destroy a site that's historic, we map all the features so at least there is a record," said Yamin, of the Commonwealth Heritage Group in West Chester.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
If you missed this brilliant theatrical commentary on contemporary race relations during last year's Fringe Festival (as I did), don't make the same mistake twice. Underground Railroad Game , reprised at FringeArts - created and performed by Jennifer Kidwell and Scott Sheppard - is both wildly entertaining and profoundly troubling. We, the audience, are cast as middle schoolers; we are about to begin a new thematic unit on the Civil War. Our two teachers have teamed up to make history come alive with the "Underground Railroad Game," whereby little black dolls are hidden in various spots around the school, and students, divided between the Union Army and the Confederate Army, have to transport the dolls to safe houses or else capture them.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When George B. McLaughlin was a student at a small college in North Carolina in the early 1960s, he knew how to share his music. "He was a DJ on the college radio station for two years," his wife, Maryann, said. And although what is now Pfeiffer University was affiliated with the United Methodist Church, his program was named George's Orgy. In the school's town of Misenheimer, even as the Beatles were beginning their tidal wave, Mr. McLaughlin showcased his favorite: Elvis Presley.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Before the mid-'70s, a psychiatrist would have been mad to admit he was gay. Quite literally. At the time, homosexuality was listed as a mental illness in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . Philadelphia psychiatrist John Ercel Fryer, however, did just that in 1972 - and of all places at the American Psychiatric Association's annual conference in Dallas. "I am a homosexual. I am a psychiatrist," he said, opening a now-famous speech. To protect himself - he already had lost a job at the University of Pennsylvania because he was gay - he wore a rubber Halloween mask, calling himself Dr. H. Anonymous.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
A year ago, Carson Wentz, a tall, strong-armed quarterback from North Dakota State whom the Eagles are expected to select Thursday with the second pick in the NFL draft, was just another name on a list that included a dozen other draft hopefuls at that position - and he wasn't very far up the list, either. Things can change quickly, however, and they certainly did for Wentz as he parlayed a title-winning season with a strong performance in the Senior Bowl and impressive showings at the NFL combine and private workouts.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Not even the great Harry Houdini can escape TV's unceasing demand for amateur detectives. Starting 9 p.m. Monday on Fox, the famed magician, played by Michael Weston ( House ), will join Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephen Mangan, Episodes ) in Houdini & Doyle , a Canadian-British period drama that celebrates one of history's more interesting friendships, X-Files style. Doyle, the man behind literature's leading skeptic, is the Fox Mulder in this duo, a man who wants to believe in an afterlife and in communication with the dead.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
They're thinking about it. They have to be thinking about it. How could they not be thinking about it? These are the Washington Capitals. This is the franchise that has lost 10 postseason series in which it held a two-game lead, including one last year. No NHL franchise has lost more, and the Capitals have been around only since 1974. They're younger than Jaromir Jagr. And here they are, having won the first three games of this first-round series against the Flyers, now facing a Game 6 at the Wells Fargo Center on Sunday, and they wouldn't be human, and they certainly wouldn't be Washington Capitals, if they weren't thinking about that history, and if it weren't weighing on them a bit. "I don't think this team has any playoff history.
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