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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Local arts watchers had to wonder why InterAct Theatre's hands-on boss, producing artistic director Seth Rozin, wasn't directing, or including any of his own plays, in much of his company's 2014-15 season. Few realized that by April, Rozin would be announcing not only that InterAct was leaving its longtime home at the Adrienne Theater but also that it was leading four other theater organizations into a new space in the old Drake Hotel ballroom in September. "Truthfully, when we selected this season, we didn't exactly know we'd be spending the year in lease negotiations, design meetings, and fund-raising mode for a new home," Rozin said April 1, the day he announced the Drake deal.
SPORTS
April 12, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
If you're looking for a way to celebrate National Parks Week, or to challenge your legs on rolling hills - or both - add the Valley Forge Revolutionary Five-Mile Run to your calendar. The April 19 event will be the 10th running of the race, which is more commonly known as the Rev Run. It started as an event to to get people to come to Upper Merion Township, said race director Kirsten Tallman. Together with the Valley Forge and Montgomery County convention and Visitors Bureau and the National Parks Service, they came up with a five-mile run through Valley Forge National Historic Park.
SPORTS
April 10, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Is it really possible for the top-ranked golfer, who's only trying to win his third straight major and complete a career Grand Slam a month shy of his 26th birthday, to come into the Masters flying under the radar? Maybe Rory McIlroy doesn't want to be considered the obvious favorite this week. Too bad. No way it can be Tiger Woods, even though his first sighting in 2 months has driven the price of a tournament badge way up. When asked, Rory suggested defending champ Bubba Watson, who also won a green jacket in 2012.
SPORTS
April 5, 2015
INDIANAPOLIS - You know the world is spinning wildly out of control when Duke is on the undercard and Mark Emmert is on the right side of history. That is the backdrop to tonight's Final Four - college basketball's most successful program of the last 30 years relegated to warmup act for college basketball's most successful program ever, and the NCAA president a voice of reason in the debate around Indiana's capital on the now-revised "religious freedom" law that was devised by minds that needed opening.
SPORTS
April 3, 2015
INDIANAPOLIS - Here are my suggestions as you get set to watch Kentucky try for 40-0 at the Final Four. Ignore the slogans: "one and done," "succeed and proceed," "players' first program. " Forget what you remember of John Calipari at Massachusetts. Don't get caught up in the morality play that some of these players are not really students or at least not for long. Look at college basketball at the top levels in 2015 the way it should be looked at - as a big business. The Kentucky coach recognized that when he got the highest-pressure job in the game and created a model that is built for short-term students and long-term success.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | BY GAR JOSEPH, Daily News Staff Writer josephg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5895
WILLIAM Scott Vare was a vote-stealer and a boodler. It seemed unlikely that his bid for a U.S. Senate seat would win the endorsement of any of Philadelphia's five daily newspapers. So he started his own. The International News Service announced its March 31, 1925, birth this way: "The first edition of the ' Philadelphia Daily News ,' a pictorial tabloid paper, made its appearance on the streets here at noon. A forty page paper was the initial offering of the Philadelphia Tabloid Publishing Company, publishers of the paper.
SPORTS
March 29, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - What do you call it when you enter an inning out of the bullpen and give up five straight hits, record only one out, and see seven runs tagged to your pitching line when it comes to an end? "The worst outing in the history of the world," Jake Diekman said. Diekman, one of the locks for a spot in the Phillies bullpen, got battered by the Yankees' bats in the fifth inning of yesterday's 10-0, rain-shortened Phillies loss. Diekman gave up a double to nine-hole hitter Brendan Ryan and then four straight singles before recording an out. Seven of the eight batters he faced reached base and scored.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though few corners of the classical music world have the cultivated dignity of song recitals, they're also places where a singer's emotions of the moment can't hide behind characters, plots, or costumes. Only an hour or so before singing his all-Schubert joint recital with soprano Susanna Phillips, bass-baritone Eric Owens learned that Tuesday's Germanwings plane crash in the French Alps had killed his fellow Metropolitan Opera Wagnerite contralto Maria Radner, who sang Erda to his Alberich in Das Rheingold . Not until after intermission did he mention it and explain he was so tearful - by way of explaining his need to use a music stand to stay better focused on the program at hand.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of the 22 young women who founded the nation's largest predominantly African American sorority, Pauline Oberdorfer Minor was very much a mystery. The life of the Philadelphia High School for Girls graduate, who founded the sorority with fellow Howard University students in 1913, was a jumble of often disconnected parts. Minor was valedictorian of her college class. She taught school in West Chester, wrote two books, and was an accomplished singer. And yet, Delta Sigma Theta members only recently confirmed, she died as a housekeeper in Philadelphia and was buried in a place seemingly unfit for her accomplishments: with three other bodies in a pauper's grave in Delaware County.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The messages the company received were the usual sort. A few impatient customers asked the company to speed up their orders. One paid off a bill. Another apologized for not having the money just yet. One message demanded the company pay money it owed. What makes the messages unusual - and precious - are the dates on the letters, 1834, and to whom they were addressed, the family of Rebecca Lukens, the nation's first female industrialist. "We're all aquiver because this [letter]
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