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NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Mo'ne Davis reached into the back pocket of her baseball pants after the game and emptied what was inside. A $5 bill. A pair of ones. A nickel. Pitching with a little money, Davis said, is time-tested good luck. She did it once when she was little, pitched well, and has done it ever since. It worked again Friday afternoon at the Little League World Series at Howard J. Lamade Stadium. The 13-year-old from South Philadelphia allowed two hits, struck out eight, and walked none in a six-inning shutout, sending Taney to a 4-0 victory over Nashville (Tenn.)
NEWS
August 19, 2014
NEVER TRUST a skinny chef. Nor one with a spotless apron. I trust Walter Staib, built like a Black Forest barrel with a winter-frost Vandyke. In a world crawling with skinny chefs, Iron Chefs and nuisance chefs, give me Walter. "I don't have tattoos, I haven't been in jail, I'm an ordinary guy," he says. This ordinary guy has published six cookbooks, his PBS "A Taste of History" series snagged four Emmys in five seasons, he's a mega-consultant who has launched 650 restaurants around the globe.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
SPORTS
July 9, 2012
For Phillies fans in the ill-fated 1964 season, it was easy to believe New York's new Shea Stadium was a magical place. On June 21, 1964, Phils ace Jim Bunning pitched the first perfect game by a National League hurler since 1880. And 16 days later, on July 7, rightfielder Johnny Callison nailed a two-out, ninth-inning three-run home run in the All-Star Game against Red Sox super-closer Dick "The Monster" Raditz. It remains the only walk-off homer in All-Star Game history. But, as the Daily News' Stan Hochman wrote, it wasn't Callison's style to boast.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
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NEWS
August 19, 2014
NEVER TRUST a skinny chef. Nor one with a spotless apron. I trust Walter Staib, built like a Black Forest barrel with a winter-frost Vandyke. In a world crawling with skinny chefs, Iron Chefs and nuisance chefs, give me Walter. "I don't have tattoos, I haven't been in jail, I'm an ordinary guy," he says. This ordinary guy has published six cookbooks, his PBS "A Taste of History" series snagged four Emmys in five seasons, he's a mega-consultant who has launched 650 restaurants around the globe.
SPORTS
August 12, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
They saved Chuck Bednarik's introduction for last. He emerged Sunday onto Franklin Field through a giant, inflatable Eagles helmet. Steadying himself on a walker, the 89-year-old could not reach out to shake hands as he passed the column of current Eagles. So they went to him. Eagles linebacker Connor Barwin leaned in and said a few words. The two stood just a few yards from the spot where Bednarik sat on Green Bay running back Jim Taylor as the clock expired in the 1960 NFL championship game.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buried in the soil outside the Indian King Tavern museum in Haddonfield are remains from more than a century ago. Among things retrieved so far: broken pieces of glass goblets and pottery and an old coin drilled through the middle, all discarded there in the underbelly of a long-gone addition to the building. Those shards of history, inside buried brick walls, lay untouched until last month, when an excavation crew of high school students and other local volunteers as well as professional archaeologists began work on the site.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Thomas Fitzgerald, and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Standing in a beer garden across from the Liberty Bell, the city's leaders vowed Thursday to lure the Democratic National Convention to Philadelphia and announced their slogan: "Let's make history again. " Ed Rendell, the former mayor and governor, would not say whether that was a sly reference to the candidate he supports - Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton, who could be the first woman to win a major party's nomination for president. "You can work on figuring that out," he said with a smile.
SPORTS
August 6, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
THE FIRST time the PGA was held at Valhalla, what unfolded was hardly memorable. But the next time would turn into something historic. In 1996, when it was only a decade old, Valhalla hosted the season's fourth major. The fact that Jack Nicklaus was the designer of the Louisville, Ky., course might have had something to do with that. Of course, the fact that the PGA of America had a 25 percent interest in the club probably didn't hurt, either. The organization that runs this championship eventually became the sole owner, which also explains why the Ryder Cup went there in 2008.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THREE WEEKS before taking the helm of North Philadelphia's Zion Baptist Church, the Rev. A. Carl Prince met with leaders of the small Virginia church he was leaving. On Dec. 18, 2011, he and Mount Hope Baptist Church leaders signed an "Announcement of Retirement" that took effect at the end of that year. Prince asked that "in the interest of the Church and Christian civility, that all litigation and investigations both civil and criminal, present and future, be ceased," the statement said.
SPORTS
July 18, 2014
PHILADELPHIA STARS, 1983-84 Here is a look at the 2 years the Stars played in Philadelphia: 1983 About the Stars (15-3): Coached by Jim Mora after George Perles unexpectedly bolted for the Michigan State job just before the season started . . . Running back Kelvin Bryant was the league MVP, but it was coordinator Vince Tobin's "Doghouse Defense" that led the way in the regular season. Philadelphia allowed less than 12 points per game during the regular season (but 62 in their two playoff games . . . Played at Veterans Stadium where they averaged 18,650 in attendance . . . Overcame seven turnovers and a 21-point deficit with 12 minutes left to stun Chicago in overtime of a playoff game at the Vet. The game was terrific.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just across from the Liberty Bell, another homage to America's roots opened Tuesday afternoon: a beer garden highlighting the country's own brews. Independence Beer Garden, located on the west side of Independence Mall at the foot of the Dow Chemical building, served its first glass just before 4 p.m. Michael Schulson, a 41-year-old chef who also owns Philadelphia's Sampan restaurant, always wanted to open a beer garden. Now, after a few hiccups that delayed the opening, he finally has. With 20 American beers on tap, the "garden" is big - approximately 22,000 square feet.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IN ENGLAND, only two courses are older than Royal Liverpool. Or Hoylake, as it's better known for the seaside town that surrounds it. The club as founded in 1869 and 28 years later hosted the first of what this week will be a dozen Open Championships, as they simply call it everywhere outside the United States. In the modern rotation, only St. Andrews (28), Muirfield (16) and Royal Troon (14) have been the venue more often. It was taken out of the rotation after 1967 not because of the course but rather the notion that it could no longer cope with the logistical issues, such as parking and concession space.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
VICE PRESIDENT Joe Biden celebrated America's 238th birthday at Independence Hall, where he considered the history and future of the nation's freedoms. Speaking to an enthusiastic crowd that gathered yesterday despite an overcast sky and drizzling rain, Biden spoke of the work the Founding Fathers did in Philadelphia in 1776. The event, part of the Wawa Welcome America Festival, focused not just on the signing of the Declaration of Independence but also on the 60th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 1954 that desegregated schools and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
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