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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
About 2,000 Cub and Boy Scouts from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, New York and Virginia participated in the 80th annual Valley Forge Pilgrimage and Encampment over Presidents Day Weekend. Gen. Daniel Morgan was this year's theme person.
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NEWS
June 19, 2015
SO ENDS A week bracketed by strange, conflicting bookends: On one end, the news of a white woman appropriating a black identity. On the other, the news of a white man bent on eliminating black lives in a horrible shooting at a church in Charleston, S.C. And while Rachel Dolezal sparked many conversations, let's call that story what it was : a novelty, an aberration. The other story - the hatred that led to a mass execution of nine black lives who had gathered to study the Bible in an historic black church in Charleston - is, alas, not an aberration.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
THE SHOOTING that killed nine people Wednesday at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., which officials are calling racially motivated, isn't the first tragedy to strike the congregation since it separated from a predominantly white church over a land dispute in 1816. White supremacists burned down the church in 1822 after learning one of its founders was planning a slave revolt. Some parishioners fled north to Philly, to Mother Bethel AME Church on 6th Street near Lombard, the first of many driven out as tensions rose over slavery in the South, according to Mother Bethel's the Rev. Dr. Mark Tyler.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Domenic and Tommy are the closest thing to royalty at the Reading Terminal Market. Domenic M. Spataro, owner of Spataro's cheesesteaks. Tommy Nicolosi, owner of DiNic's Roast Pork & Beef. Some afternoons, the two old friends allow themselves a liquid lunch at the Terminal bar, Molly Malloy's. Who's going to tell them otherwise? Between them, they have about 85 years of experience at the Terminal. Domenic started working weekends and summers at his father's buttermilk stand when he was 8, then went full time the day after graduating from Northeast High.
NEWS
June 10, 2015
THIS WEEK CNN rolls out a documentary on the '70s, following its remembrance of the '60s, a decade regarded as the most revolutionary in American history, aside from the Revolution itself. Wrong. The most revolutionary period in American history is now . The '60s brought a sea of changes to music, movies, fashion and to what had been largely a patriarchal society. (Think "Mad Men. ") It was the beginning of feminism and an attempt to dismantle institutionalized and discriminatory American laws and customs.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The metal detector was beeping, and that meant it was picking up an object in the ground. Was it an artifact from the Battle of Red Bank in 1777? A lead musket ball? A cannonball? A button? Tim Reno of Toms River, N.J., dug about three inches down and carefully extracted a piece of grooved brass shaped like a bow tie. The find in National Park had probably been there 238 years, ever since England's Hessian allies massed for an attack on the Americans at Fort Mercer during the Revolutionary War. Mercer - along with Fort Mifflin on the Pennsylvania side of the Delaware River - had prevented British ships from supplying the Redcoat army occupying Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 7, 2015
I'm Glad I Did By Cynthia Weil Soho. 272 pp. $18.99 Reviewed by Katie Haegele Only real music nerds can tell you the names of the writers behind hit songs, but there are some everybody knows. Take "Don't Know Much," which should be playing in your head, in Aaron Neville's voice, right about now. Or "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," which is, incredibly, the most-played song of the 20th century. Both of these, plus hundreds of others, were written by a woman named Cynthia Weil.
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
ELMONT, N.Y. - All eyes at Belmont Park on Friday morning were on the lookout. A man and a woman together at the rail, each with their own set of binoculars, spotted him first. "He's by himself . . . There he goes. " Eventually, here he came, American Pharoah, taking his last gallop, his final preparation for a bout with history in Saturday's Belmont Stakes, as the colt tries to become the 12th horse to win the Triple Crown, ending a 37-year drought. Trainer Bob Baffert has been right here before, with three horses that had won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness only to fall short – "I think I'm responsible for the drought," Baffert said Friday after American Pharoah returned to the barn.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The planned demolition of an 1890 mansion once owned by a founder of U.S. Pipe may pale in comparison to another razing that took place at the Burlington City site about 100 years ago, after the stately home had been converted to company offices. The mansion, a three-story Colonial Revival-style building on the Delaware River, was occupied by Andrew McNeal and his family until 1899, when he sold his company to the U.S. Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry, according to an application the city submitted to have the building placed on the state and federal Registers of Historic Places.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Sarah Norris couldn't believe her luck. The new Arcadia softball coach was putting together her first recruiting class and things were going well. Then, Norris and the Knights got themselves a steal. They got Jackie Bilotti. "I'm still kind of on cloud nine and wondering 'How did this happen?' " Norris said. Bilotti, a North Penn standout, was the kind of player that wouldn't hesitate before diving off the mound to make a catch. A player that wouldn't avoid a collision if it meant she may be safe.
REAL_ESTATE
May 24, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
So passionate is Rick Baldt about the Jersey Shore that he claims to have spent 63 summers there. He's 62, but he counts when he was in utero. His parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents were all seashore lovers. Rick and wife Beth, who live in Moorestown, had never owned their own place, though. Instead, they had rented, almost always in Surf City on Long Beach Island. Beth Baldt, a speech pathologist, and Rick, a retired executive for an industrial-equipment company, were hoping to buy a Shore house at last.
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