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NEWS
August 1, 2007
BECAUSE the Barnes Foundation is an art collection, people overlook its important history: Matisse visited and designed a mural for it. If any city could appreciate preserving history, you'd think it was Philadelphia. We could move Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell to Washington, making it easier for tourists to see more American history in one place. Maybe it would draw more tourists and money. But it would be just as stupid as moving the Barnes. Wayne Bremser, San Francisco
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
The first Big 5 game in First Union Center history was more than 35 minutes old before a pulse was detected in the building. The game between Villanova and Penn had been over for, say, 20 minutes when Penn's Jeff Schiffner fouled Villanova's Gary Buchanan in the backcourt with 4:46 remaining. The Wildcats had long since clinched only the fourth perfect Big 5 record in school history and the first since 1985, when Villanova coach Steve Lappas was a first-year 'Nova assistant on a team that would go on to some prominence that spring.
NEWS
February 29, 2008
IT WAS A game that will go down with the great ones. 1969: Villanova vs. La Salle, with two of the best ever, Kenny Durrett and Howard Porter. 1986: No. 20 Temple, comes from 20 points back in the second half to beat La Salle. 2008: La Salle goes 16-29 from the three-point line to beat NCAA-hopeful St. Joseph's. All these games were at the Palestra. On Feb. 18, it was hot, sweaty and it smelled. It seemed that the sea of gold owned everything to the east and a wave of maroon occupied everything to the west.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Katz, 75, of Philadelphia, the Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, whose intellectual rigor shaped the school's urban studies program as well as current thinking about the urban poor, died Saturday, Aug. 23, of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Katz's early work at Penn focused on the history of 19th-century American education. He then delved into the history of urban social structure and family organization. In the last decade, he turned his attention to the history of social welfare and understanding poverty.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Here's a quiz for all you history buffs. Which American president called big businessmen "malefactors of great wealth"? a. Jimmy Carter b. Harry Truman c. Franklin Delano Roosevelt d. Theodore Roosevelt The answer, of course, is d. Theodore Roosevelt was no Marxist, but he clearly understood the dangers of unbridled capitalism. That's why he fought to dissolve the railroad trust and other huge monopolies. I wonder whether our current President knows this history.
NEWS
March 5, 2004 | By David B. Brawer
For more than 50 years, Philadelphia has struggled with the question of how we are to survive as a modern metropolis after the manufacturing jobs that fueled the city's growth for 150 years left after World War II. How was the city to prosper as a destination, as somewhere more than a pit stop between New York and Washington? How were we to develop new jobs and a vibrant tourist industry? What, in the end, makes Philadelphia unique? The answer is simple: It's the history. Philadelphia is believed to have the largest collection of 18th-century buildings in North America.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
Graeme Park, a state historical site, is sponsoring a children's summer history program for youngsters in grades 3 through 6. Activities explore the day-to-day routine of colonial life, including cooking in a fireplace and period crafts and games.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | MICHAEL PEREZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Seafaring reenactors exchanged gunfire with pirates yesterday in a day of nautical adventure at Penn's Landing. The two-hour spectacle brought to life the classic book series Horatio Hornblower by novelist C.S. Forester.
NEWS
October 25, 1986
The other day, President Reagan said, "How we vote on Nov. 4 may influence the course of history. " Remember this, and vote for Bob Edgar as the next U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. Help restore dignity and sanity to the Senate. His voting record as a U.S. representative reveals his consistent concern for humanity. Sylvia and Milton Casper Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Margaret Perry became hooked on history when she researched the past life of her house. Now she is chairwoman of the Wrightstown Historic Commission, which is preparing for the township's 300th anniversary this September. To expose her home's history, Perry poked around in the oddest of places. She remembers chipping whitewash off a flat stone that is part of the wall behind her oil furnace. After several hours' work, she uncovered the carving R M 1744. "I was excited," she said.
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SPORTS
November 18, 2014
Sunday's loss in Green Bay represented the fourth-highest points total allowed by the Eagles in a game in team history. Here are the infamous five: Lost, 62 -10, to the Giants on Nov. 26, 1972 Lost, 56 -7, to Cowboys on Oct. 9, 1966 Lost, 56 -0, to Giants on Oct. 15, 1933, first game in franchise history Lost, 53 -20, to the Packers on Sunday Lost, 52 -20, to the Broncos on Sept. 29, 2013
SPORTS
November 16, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
By now, everyone agrees that the story the Eagles and their fans hope is evolving - the rag-arm-to-riches resurrection of Mark Sanchez - is going to be a great one, if only it would actually happen. If Sanchez continues to win in relief of the injured Nick Foles, and keeps the Eagles on course for a postseason run, then, yes, it will be one heck of a story. Not only would it be a feel-good turning point for Sanchez, who exited New York after four active seasons with the Jets as an object of ridicule, but it would certainly add to the growing legend of Charles Kelly, Miracle Man. The only problem with such a comeback and such a story is that the NFL doesn't appear to offer a precedent of anything quite like it ever happening before.
SPORTS
November 8, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The buzz at Joe Hand's Gym that came with Bernard Hopkins' media day last week had simmered. A day later, it was time for the 49-year-old to focus again on Saturday's fight against Sergey Kovalev. The dozen spectators - mostly members of Hopkins' camp - pulled up chairs or sat on the tile floor. They watched in near silence, speaking in whispers, as Hopkins readied to spar at the Northern Liberties gym. Hopkins called his opponent "Iron Fists," a 27-year-old Ukranian who was instructed to mimic Kovalev's fighting style.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Voters in Pennsylvania are poised Tuesday to either make Republican Tom Corbett the first governor to lose reelection in the modern era, or hand him a historic comeback victory against Democrat Tom Wolf. New Jersey voters will choose a U.S. senator and decide the Philadelphia area's hottest congressional contest. Those are the region's marquee races in a midterm election that, nationwide, could shift the balance of power in the Senate and reflect a growing dissatisfaction with officeholders from the statehouse to the White House.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE OLDEST house in Bellmawr, Camden County, sat in the back corner of a sprawling cemetery, mostly unnoticed, for centuries. The Hugg/Harrison/Glover house, as one local historian called the brick home, had additions tacked on over time, paint splattered over paint and covered in wallpaper. The date "1764" painted across the bricks of its west wall were hidden by trees and vegetation. Now the home's age is visible to thousands, day and night, unveiled atop a hill of dirt where South Jersey's busiest highways meet thanks to a Department of Transportation project that could turn it into rubble.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
BRETT BROWN may not be as familiar as he's going to get with Marquis Teague's game, but he certainly is familiar with the makeup of the young man. Brown and Shawn Teague, Marquis' dad, were roommates at Boston University, where the two played for coach Rick Pitino. Shawn transferred to BU from Missouri to play for Pitino and also to play with his brother, John. Jeff Teague, Marquis' older brother, plays for the Atlanta Hawks. In Marquis, whom the team acquired on Friday from the Brooklyn Nets with a 2019 second-round draft pick for Casper Ware, Brown envisions a lightning rod of an offensive player and someone who will have to prove himself defensively in order to see minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Kelley thinks roller coasters and haunted houses have a lot in common. "[They] share the appeal of being something that seems really dangerous, but at the same time you know you're safe," says Kelley, senior vice president and director of public programming at Eastern State Penitentiary. "Haunted houses are like that in that you feel like you're going in somewhere you shouldn't be. " This Halloween, spooky thrills aren't contained within four walls. Festivities throughout Philadelphia cater to the whole family, from date night-worthy scares and beer-boosted tours to kid-friendly excursions.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Deborah Waxman leafed through her mail before unwrapping a small orange, the punch line to a fabled Jewish myth. As it went, a rabbi once teased that a woman rabbi was like an orange on a ceremonial seder plate used during Passover. Neither belonged. The orange was a sly affirmation from a friend, mailed to Waxman as a symbol of the history she made by becoming the first woman and the first lesbian to lead a major movement of Judaism. Waxman, 47, took over in January as head of the Reconstructionist movement and president of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, the movement's seminary.
SPORTS
October 21, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Lost in the shuffle of the Flyers' 6-5 comeback win in Dallas on Saturday night was the fact that Pierre-Edouard Bellemare was part of a historic event. The Flyers' 29-year-old center and his fellow countryman and role model, Dallas' Antoine Roussel, became the first France-born players to face each other in an NHL game, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. "It was special," Bellemare said in his thick French accent. "It felt great. " Bellemare and Roussel went to dinner Friday night, but that their main topic wasn't the history they were about to make.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
Dotty Brown is a former Inquirer editor who is writing a book on the history of Boathouse Row for Temple University Press Every year, thousands of people pound down the paved backbone of the city in the sweaty exuberance of the Broad Street Run. Next weekend, in another extraordinary test of athleticism and determination open to all, the sound will be the beating of oars down a different city artery - the Schuylkill. Rowing out their hearts and lungs in the Head of the Schuylkill Regatta will be more than 80 categories of rowers sorted by age, sex, and ability, from high school teenagers and college freshmen to committed athletes striving for world competition to masters rowers in their 50s, 60s, 70s, and, yes, 80s. Also racing will be gold-medal Olympic champions from New Zealand and top rowers from Norway, Australia, the Czech Republic, and the United States.
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