CollectionsHistory Books
IN THE NEWS

History Books

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Like books, quilts can tell a story. You just have to know how to read them. The stories told by African-American quilts sometimes make use of patterns, symbols and techniques that have traveled oceans and survived centuries. These quilts are filled with the lives of the hands that made them, hands that pass on the histories of families and a people from one generation to the next. The quilts also are works of art. If you've ever looked at your grandmother's quilt and wondered how all those squares came together - or why anyone would take the time to sew scraps together by hand, rather than buy a blanket - you'll understand why researchers such as Cassandra Stancil think studying the quilts of African- Americans, who have been quilting since the time of slavery, is important.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
UNLESS Condi Rice plans on taking the Fifth, why shouldn't she testify - under oath - before the 9/11 Commission? Already key members of the Bush administration have appeared before the commission - Secretary of State Colin Powell and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Even President Bush is planning to testify. So why not National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice? The final straw for us was Rice's appearance on "60 Minutes," where she tried to quell the growing controversy stirred by former counterterrorism chief Richard Clarke.
SPORTS
December 11, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Central Bucks West made history last year by becoming the first Class 4-A school to win two championships in the 10-year history of the PIAA football playoffs. Tomorrow at Hersheypark Stadium in Hershey, the Bucks (14-0) will try to rewrite the record book again. No 4-A team has ever won back-to-back titles. The last obstacle standing between the Bucks and back-to-back perfect seasons is West champ New Castle (11-3). Winner of 29 straight games, C.B. West is coming off a 34-7 win over Parkland.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
This is the year that making history finally became a daily event, sort of like making coffee. We got up in the morning, put on the water and counted the number of governments or assumptions that toppled overnight. But making history, it turns out, is more than churning out dates for future students to memorize on their time charts. Making history is also, and in tandem, rewriting the past. In just a few weeks, we've seen Europe updated and backdated with truths. Now we'll find out whose truth will be etched, not only in history books, but in the collective memory.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By JI-YEON MARY YUHFILL
I grew up hearing, seeing and almost believing that America was white - albeit with a little black tinged here and there - and that white was best. The white people were everywhere in my 1970s Chicago childhood: Founding Fathers, Lewis and Clark, Lincoln, Daniel Boone, Carnegie, presidents, explorers and industrialists galore. The only black people were slaves. The only Indians were scalpers. I never heard one word about how Benjamin Franklin was so impressed by the Iroquois federation of nations that he adapted that model into our system of state and federal government.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
My response to the Jan. 19 editorial that said, "Unless the administration changes course soon, 1987 may go down in history books as the year of the arms-control treaty that 'might have been,' " is: If the administration changes course, the late 1980s and early 1990s may go down in history books as the age when the Soviet Union added the United States of America to its roster of happy, peaceful, prosperous countries such as Poland, Afghanistan, Cuba...
NEWS
May 27, 2002
Terrorizing a community was exactly the intention of Bobby Frank Cherry and the other Ku Klux Klansmen who planted the dynamite that went off that Sunday morning in 1963. . . . How completely they misjudged the nation's reaction to the deaths of four black girls preparing for choir in the basement of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. . . . Putting Cherry in prison, even now, sends a message to many places, ranging from the murdered girls' families to the history books.
NEWS
September 26, 1997
Yesterday was the 40th anniversary of the Little Rock Nine. An Arkansan schoolboy who watched that saga unfold on TV is now president. Bill Clinton had to wait for college to attend school with a person of another race - and yesterday he held open the doors of Central High School as the Nine walked through to commemorate what is and what has been. If anything, yesterday's powerful ceremony was about memory. Those of us who were there or watched on TV as the future walked through the door - we should pass on how it looked and felt, what it meant, what it means.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
RE JANE Gilvary's enlightening and gregarious piece of literature ( op-ed, "Cracker History 101," July 26 ): Are you out of your cotton-picking mind? How could you use eight names to minimize what more than 100 million white Christians did to the colored man throughout history? ("Colored man" includes Indians, Vietnamese, Jews and others.) How could you stand there and list just eight men who helped give colored men their civil rights, rights that were theirs from the beginning - but not acknowledged by more than 100 million white people?
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Until this week, history was exactly the way it was written in history books to most Stoney Creek Elementary School students in Whitpain Township. Then they met Mariline Wilkins, great-great-grandniece of abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Wilkins told them stories that are not in the history books. They especially liked the drama of the story about Tubman killing her own brother. Wilkins, a North Philadelphia resident and an aunt by marriage to Stoney Creek second-grade teacher Rita Johnson, brought history to the students on Wednesday, part of the school's observance of Black History Month.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By Jacqueline Bigar, For The Inquirer
ARIES (March 21-April 19) (*****) Zero in on some friends who seem to have the whole Fourth of July routine down. You will witness a lot of fun talk and friends socializing tonight. Toss yourself right in the middle of the whole scene. There is no telling whom you might meet as this party continues until late Sunday, when you need some downtime and vanish ... hopefully not alone. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) (*****) The bull is center stage, and wherever you appear, all eyes turn to you. Whether you are the host or hostess of the celebration is not even relevant: Others cannot get their gaze off you. You seem to be very much in touch with others' needs.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
History books have been kind to Philadelphia - the city William Penn hewed with its rational lines and ordered grid system; the city that gave birth to the Declaration of Independence. Yet historians have all but ignored the rich culture our area enjoyed before Europeans claimed it for their own. So argues "A Lost World," the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment , which tells the story of the Lenape, who called the Delaware Valley home for 13,000 years before Penn made landfall.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In China, Maura Cunningham says, if you're going to hold an online discussion of the Tiananmen Square massacre, you'd better speak in code. Don't mention June 4, the date the tanks rolled against unarmed protesters. Instead, try "May 35th" - a count of that month's 31 days plus four in June. It's a way around the censors and to avoid the lurking presence of the state security apparatus. The game being played between citizen and government isn't exactly cat-and-mouse, said Cunningham, a scholar of Chinese history from Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was arrested that October evening in 1777, Jonas Cattell did not realize his detention would help the patriot cause, much less affect the outcome of a Revolutionary War battle. The 18-year-old was corralled with other suspected rebels by Hessian mercenaries when he overheard talk of an attack on Americans at Fort Mercer in Red Bank, N.J., and he knew what he had to do. Released the next day, Cattell ran 10 miles, bypassing Hessians along the way, to alert fellow colonials who then repelled the larger enemy force, killing hundreds.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deirdre Kelleher spent Wednesday with her head in a hole, arm-deep in dirt. This is the Temple University anthropology doctoral student's second summer orchestrating a "public archaeology" excavation in Old City's historic Elfreth's Alley. Kelleher and a crew of volunteers are searching for clues about the lives of 19th-century immigrants, in one of the first projects of its kind in Philadelphia. "The 19th century is overshadowed by previous history," said Michele Schutte, assistant and curator at the Elfreth's Alley Museum, referring to Philadelphia's fascination with colonial times.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Edmund S. Morgan, 97, a leading scholar of the colonial era who helped reinvigorate the reputations of the Founding Fathers, probed the country's racial and religious origins, and, in his 80s, wrote a best-selling biography of Benjamin Franklin, died Monday in Connecticut. Mr. Morgan died at Yale-New Haven Hospital, where he was being treated for pneumonia, said his wife, Marie. A professor emeritus at Yale University, he was the author of more than a dozen books, including Birth of the Republic , The Puritan Dilemma , and Inventing the People , winner in 1989 of the Bancroft Prize.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
I would like to know how the police commissioner and the mayor can publicly praise the Police and Fire departments for their professionalism and service to the city, but, when it comes to the plaque dedications for the police officers and firefighters, they seem to always have something else to do. When the announcements are printed up for these services, it is always noted that "the mayor or his designate" and "the police commissioner or...
SPORTS
December 8, 2011 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
Throughout the field hockey season, a one-word question seemed to follow Eastern freshman Austyn Cuneo: How? There's too much on the forward's resumé that shouldn't be accomplished by a freshman. Cuneo tied the New Jersey single-season field hockey scoring record, scored the winning goal in the Group 4 state final, and completely distinguished herself from any other freshman ever to take the field for the nation's most storied high school field hockey program. How?
SPORTS
October 8, 2010 | by Vegas Vic
49ERS (-3) over Eagles: Can Doc Halladay step under center in between starts? The Phils wouldn't need him until at least Monday . . . Exactly what is it about the West that has given the Birds fits recently? Going back to the NFC Championship Game in 2008 against Arizona, a 32-25 loss as a 3-point favorite, our hometown heroes are (if you include Dallas, which is west of the Mississippi) 0-4 against the spread. They have covered only one of the previous seven overall and looked lousy against Washington Sunday.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
RE JANE Gilvary's enlightening and gregarious piece of literature ( op-ed, "Cracker History 101," July 26 ): Are you out of your cotton-picking mind? How could you use eight names to minimize what more than 100 million white Christians did to the colored man throughout history? ("Colored man" includes Indians, Vietnamese, Jews and others.) How could you stand there and list just eight men who helped give colored men their civil rights, rights that were theirs from the beginning - but not acknowledged by more than 100 million white people?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|