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History Channel

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NEWS
June 29, 2006 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISON CRITIC
"Her and, like, five old dudes in New York rule the roost in pizza," said the young waitress at Nizza La Bella restaurant here, about her boss, Evelyne Slomon. A few of those dudes died a while ago, so Slomon, who is one of the on-camera experts in the premiere episode of the History Channel series American Eats at 10 tonight, may have moved up the list. But you'll never get folks in the pizza game to admit it. Pizza people are passionate. They all think theirs is the only true path to enlightenment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Making a television show about the Depression that is entertaining and informative without being gloomy and depressing is not an easy task. But the History Channel, again demonstrating its expertise and facility with real-life happenings, has done it. The Great Depression will air in four one-hour episodes, tonight through Thursday night at 9, on HIST. The near-perfect host is former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo. He demonstrates his fitness in his opening remarks, as he uses his own experience to illustrate how families so often helped one another through the trying and frightening 1930s: "My father had lost his job as a ditch digger when construction work virtually stopped after the [stock market]
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Lynn Elber, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - As a kid in the 1960s, reality TV king Mark Burnett was thrilled by the special-effects miracle of a sundered Red Sea in The Ten Commandments . "How cool was that?" said the producer of Survivor and The Apprentice , who watched Cecil B. DeMille's 1956 film when it aired on television. Now it's Burnett's turn to wow a small-screen audience with epic Scripture stories: He and his wife, actress Roma Downey, are producing the 10-part docudrama The Bible for the History channel.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
April in the land of television. No holiday tables, but a couple of chestnuts and way too much programming for any single person to keep up with. For a long, long time, most of the new shows came in September, when the days grew short. "Aha," said the cable channels, "we'll counterprogram in the charm of spring, when there's nothing new. " And then there was something new: a TV logjam of monumental proportions. Hot on the heels of Starz's lusty Camelot , which premiered Friday, come three more new big-deal productions on Sunday, all the kind of "event" television that TV execs are constantly touting.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talmadge O. Epps, 94, of Wayne, a World War II aerial gunner and retired electric company foreman, died Wednesday, Aug. 12, of respiratory failure at Coatesville VA Medical Center. In 1942, the Radnor High School graduate was drafted and deployed with the Army Air Force as a flight engineer aboard the B-25 Mitchell bomber. He served with the 500 Bomb Squadron, 345th Bombardment Group, in New Guinea and Australia. Mr. Epps, who had never been on an airplane, fired a gun or traveled more than 100 miles from home, operated a pair of 50-caliber machine guns, either from the top machine gun turret or from the rear of the plane.
NEWS
September 22, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Friedman, 62, of Malvern, a talk-radio host and film expert, died of kidney disease at home Sunday just hours after completing his Mr. Movie program on WPHT-AM (1210). On Saturday nights for the last 10 years, Mr. Friedman joined Steve Ross and Jimmy Murray on their Remember When radio show from 10 to midnight, and then continued with his own show until 1 a.m. Previously, he had stayed on the air all night. He loved that, said his wife, Michell Muldoon, because he could really get into in-depth discussions with callers.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* VIKINGS. 10 tonight, History Channel. * THE RED ROAD. 9 tonight, Sundance TV.   IF WE'VE learned anything in the past few TV seasons, it's that there's a sizable audience that can't get enough of scruffy, violent men and the women who love them (and sometimes fight by their sides). We've seen it with the FX hit "Sons of Anarchy," and we're seeing it again with the History Channel's "Vikings" (which resembles "Sons" far more than it does HBO's "Game of Thrones," to which it's sometimes been compared, generally not favorably)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2006 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
History doesn't need gimmicks. What history does need - especially for a mass audience - is lively storytelling. It gets both in 10 Days That Unexpectedly Changed America, a mini-series premiering tonight at 9 on the History Channel. The result is an eccentric excursion, alternately fascinating and annoying, through the nation's past. The series, which runs with two one-hour episodes a night through Thursday, focuses on 10 events that the History Channel has deemed "influential moments in U.S. history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2003 | By ELLEN GRAY -- Daily News Television Critic
The flood of TV programming leading up to the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination began this weekend, but there's more to come: Today "Men Who Killed Kennedy. " Parts 1, 2 and 3 of a six-hour series on the various theories surrounding the assassination. 8 p.m., the History Channel. "The Kennedys. " Stacy Keach narrates this repeat of PBS' "The American Experience," which begins with patriarch Joseph Kennedy. 9 p.m., Channel 12. "JFK: The Day That Changed America.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington has become, literally and figuratively, a touchstone for the grief and remembrance attached to that conflict. But who knew that the wall would also become a drop-off point for personal mementoes, the simple things of life that remind us of each other? That singular collection has been gathered by the National Park Service, making for one of the most enigmatic and moving of exhibits displayed, in part, by the Smithsonian Institution.
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NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talmadge O. Epps, 94, of Wayne, a World War II aerial gunner and retired electric company foreman, died Wednesday, Aug. 12, of respiratory failure at Coatesville VA Medical Center. In 1942, the Radnor High School graduate was drafted and deployed with the Army Air Force as a flight engineer aboard the B-25 Mitchell bomber. He served with the 500 Bomb Squadron, 345th Bombardment Group, in New Guinea and Australia. Mr. Epps, who had never been on an airplane, fired a gun or traveled more than 100 miles from home, operated a pair of 50-caliber machine guns, either from the top machine gun turret or from the rear of the plane.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
FACE FULLY obscured but voice fully audible, Tom Bee rummages around the compartments of Franky Bradley's host stand, leading a one-man search party for something. Suddenly, his hand pops up like a periscope, waving a yellowed magazine half-shrouded in a black plastic bag. "Is this your Playboy ?" His cousin Mark Bee, owner and primary resurrector of this historic Center City space, shoots it a quick glance and nods. "Oh, yeah. There's a couple really good articles in there.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | David Hiltbrand, The Inquirer
We've entered the most recalcitrant part of the calendar. The nights are long. The windshields are frosty. Football is (almost) over, and baseball season seems like a distant dream. At least TV is stepping up to keep us entertained. Between broadcast, cable, and streaming services, there is a plethora of new shows and returning favorites in the offing. Break out the Snuggies and enjoy. The Americans (FX, Jan. 28) TV's most nuclear family returns for a third season. But the ideological schism between Cold War spies/spouses Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys is growing.
NEWS
October 23, 2014
DOES YOUR TV-watching reflect your politics? Those who buy and place political ads think it does. And, as viewing habits continue to disperse among hundreds of cable choices, political parties and groups behind so-called independent expenditures are increasingly targeting ad buys to specific channels. This is the new TV campaign. Cable is cheaper and offers niche programming. When that's coupled with advances in technology, as in "we know what you're watching," guess what?
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* VIKINGS. 10 tonight, History Channel. * THE RED ROAD. 9 tonight, Sundance TV.   IF WE'VE learned anything in the past few TV seasons, it's that there's a sizable audience that can't get enough of scruffy, violent men and the women who love them (and sometimes fight by their sides). We've seen it with the FX hit "Sons of Anarchy," and we're seeing it again with the History Channel's "Vikings" (which resembles "Sons" far more than it does HBO's "Game of Thrones," to which it's sometimes been compared, generally not favorably)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE is constantly railing on the entertainment industry's desperate need to remake properties that don't need remaking - either because they're perfect the way they were or . . . they don't need remaking. Remakes make sense only if the new technology allows for a better movie or if the first one didn't work. "Psycho"? The first one worked fine. "Sabrina"? Because you're going to improve upon Humphrey Bogart , Audrey Hepburn and William Holden directed by Billy Wilder ?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hot news flash! Barack Obama is not Satan ! At least, not in the smash-hit History Channel series The Bible . Actor Mohamen Mehdi Ouazanni plays the devil in a hoodie, and a bunch of people on the Web thought he looked a little too much like the 44th prez. Charges flew: They did it on purpose! Thousands of tweets and posts! Glenn Beck (it would be him) was among them: "Anyone else think the Devil in #The Bible Sunday on the History Channel looks exactly like That Guy?"
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes, you really want, desperately want, to like a TV show you know is not very good. It's irrational, but you root for the show, its stars, its writers; you suspend your critical faculties the best you can and cheer it on as you would a Little Leaguer who's got heart, but no game. That's the experience - exasperating, a little heartbreaking - of sitting through ABC's Red Widow , a family-melodrama/organized-crime thriller starring the always-capable Australian actor Radha Mitchell, premiering Sunday with a two-episode installment.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lloyd Wallace, 83, a Philadelphia police officer who became an elementary schoolteacher, died Thursday, Nov. 15, of kidney failure at Stapeley in Germantown, a senior living complex. Lloyd Audley Oliver Wallace was born June 26, 1929, in Philadelphia, the son of Uriel Hamilton Wallace and Ivy Booth Wallace. During the Depression, the family moved to New York, returning to Philadelphia in 1939. Mr. Wallace attended Philadelphia public schools, graduating from Benjamin Franklin High School, where he played football, in 1947.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Dylan Lovan, Associated Press
LEBANON, Ky. - Ernie Brown's search for dangerous snapping turtles in a central Kentucky pond ends in a swirl of muddy water and loud whooping sounds, his bare hands clutching one of the angry, armored reptiles. "Wooh, man - they feisty today!" Brown shouts, breathing heavily on a hot day in mid-May. Brown says he has spent four decades turtle trapping, earning him the nickname "Turtleman" around his hometown of Lebanon, which is nestled near the heart of Kentucky's bourbon country.
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