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NEWS
June 29, 2004
When State Representative John Perzel engineered the takeover of the School District of Philadelphia, the School Board became the School Reform Commission (SRC). Everybody hoped that "reform" would bring "improvement" in our children's education. When Perzel took over the Philadelphia Parking Authority (PPA), he promised up to $45 million a year to the School District. After all those years with increasing the number of the PPA's political patronage jobs, the PPA just gave the School District a measly $4 million.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
Cannon fire had South Philadelphia booming over the weekend during celebrations at Fort Mifflin commemorating the 214th anniversary of the siege of 1777, when British artillery hammered the fort for 40 days. Scores of Revolutionary re-enactors gave guided tours, played 18th-century music, and displayed cooking and medical techniques. They also staged mock drills and skirmishes, although rain canceled yesterday afternoon's skirmish.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | Gifts and Decorative Accessories magazine and Daily News staff reports
Here's a look at how bridal registries have changed through the years, according to Doris Nixon, director of educational services for the National Bridal Service. 1901 - First bridal registry reportedly is started by H.C. Winkle of China Hall Co. of Rochester, Minn., after he ran into difficulty keeping track of brides' purchases or wants. Popular gift items include kerosene lamps, commode sets, hand-painted china and berry sets, pitchers with matching glasses and china. 1930s - More merchants implement bridal registries to encourage sales during the Great Depression.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Television Critic
"Moyers: The Secret Government: The Constitution in Crisis" (10 p.m. on Channel 12) serves as a reminder of many things. It reminds us of the Iran- Contra scandal. It reminds us of Watergate. It reminds us of a whole sorry legacy of questionable actions carried out without constitutional sanction. It reminds us, better than anything else broadcast during this bicentennial year, why we have a constitution in the first place. Perhaps just as important, it reminds us that Bill Moyers doesn't do commercial television any more.
NEWS
September 10, 2004 | By William C. Kashatus
The radical white supremacist group that is scheduled to rally Sept. 25 at Valley Forge National Historical Park to protest the "corrupt dictatorship" of President Bush needs to learn its American history. Jeff Schoep, commander of the National Socialist Movement, insists that the Bush administration's failure to close "America's southern border to illegal non-white immigrants and potential terrorists" undermines the "separatist views of George Washington and the ordinary soldier" at the winter encampment of Dec. 19, 1777, to June 19, 1778.
SPORTS
November 12, 1993 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
They are convinced they are college football's answer to Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis. Meet the Florida State Seminoles, ghostbusters. "Once we snap the ball, there is no history," FSU's standout linebacker, Derrick Brooks, said of tomorrow's long-awaited showdown (Channel 3, 1:30 p.m.) between the top-ranked 'Noles and No. 2 Notre Dame on the hallowed soil of Notre Dame Stadium. "You are out there to win. I don't think there's no mystique in the stadium, all that other superstition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
After Philadelphia Theatre Company's launching of Terrence McNally's Master Class, the world premiere of his new play, Some Men, has been much anticipated. Its 15 scenes range from 1925 to the present day, presenting glimpses of gay relationships as they have evolved toward same-sex marriage. I am, frankly, mystified: What is this play's purpose? Who is its intended audience? On the one hand, it seems to be a stroll down memory lane for homosexual men of a certain pre-Stonewall age. On the other hand, it seems to be a history lesson, a kind of after-school special for those heterosexuals who know about gay men only by the stereotypes that feed prejudice and homophobia and assume they are promiscuous, body-obsessed show queens who adore Barbra Streisand and Judy Garland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Postwar Japan. Tokyo in ruins. U.S. soldiers arriving to take charge. "Let's show them some good old-fashioned American swagger," barks Douglas MacArthur, the five-star general in command of rebuilding the nation he has just destroyed, as he and his officers make their way from the air base to their new HQ. Tommy Lee Jones, in baggy Army browns, puffing on an extra-long corncob pipe, does his best to approximate the storied military man. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
There's going to be a lot of people griping that Ron Maxwell's Civil War epic, "Gods and Generals," feels longer than the war itself, but it's not the film's three-hour, 49-minute running time (with intermission) that makes it such an insufferable experience. It's the way Maxwell has staged the thing. This is a movie that operates at two speeds: Somebody is either giving a fake-sounding, melodramatic speech or fighting in a fake-looking, melodramatic battle. Either way, you're watching a dressed-up simulation that only a Civil War re-enactor or a historian with a tin ear could love.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Carmela Thomas, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Ann Graeme Stedman was surprised to enter her summer kitchen and find a group of strangers, mostly women. She was more surprised to see that the women were not dressed "as women should be. " An audience of about 25 "met" Ann (1726-66), portrayed by Susan Ocksreider, Tuesday at the Hope Lodge in Fort Washington. "An Evening With Ann Graeme Stedman" was hosted by the American Association of University Women in recognition of National Women's History Month. "I hope the neighbors didn't see you come in my kitchen, because it's not proper for a lady to entertain in her kitchen," Ann told the audience as she appeared in the dark room, lit only by a fire in the stone fireplace, a few burning candles and a lantern.
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NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney spent his three minutes in the national spotlight Monday sharing with the world a grim, lesser-known part of Philadelphia's history. In 1844, immigration foes later dubbed the Know-Nothings rioted against Irish Catholic immigrants - Kenney's ancestors. Churches were burned. About 20 people died. It's history Kenney says is repeating. "The Know-Nothings have returned, and last week, in Cleveland they vowed to take their country back this November," Kenney said Monday evening to the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tucked into the usual Broadway Playbill for the new hit Shuffle Along at the Music Box Theatre is something that's not the typical size or color: a sepia replica of the show's original 1921 program from the long-demolished 63rd Street Music Hall, evidence of the distant world from which the show comes. Known as the first African American megahit, the 1921 version of Shuffle Along made the careers of songwriters Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle and helped launch Florence Mills, Adelaide Hall, and Josephine Baker.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Betty Organt, For The Inquirer
As a teacher of history and a child of the Cold War period, I was always fascinated with the events that led to the U.S. embargo against Cuba. The island nation, the Caribbean's largest, was the "forbidden fruit" of travel, which only heightened my desire to visit it. When I learned about the people-to-people tours that allowed travellers to go to Cuba to see what the Cuban government wanted them to see, I quickly made a reservation. After a briefing on what to expect, what not to expect (toilet seats in most places)
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
DESCRIBING a movie as a history lesson is often a way of belittling it. Here's an exception: "Belle," based on the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu Mbatha-Raw), an 18th-century Anglo-African woman fathered by a British aristocrat, brought back to his ancestral estate and raised to receive some, but not all, of the privileges her bloodline confers. Though raised and educated as an elite, she faces prejudice brought on by the circumstances of her birth and also her mixed-race lineage - Belle comes of age in British society at a time when the issue of slavery is hotly debated.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
LA SALLE University's Brother Joe Grabenstein used one word to describe Tom Gola during his eulogy yesterday morning. Genuine. Hundreds of people packed into St. Albert the Great Catholic Church to say goodbye to Gola one final time. Gola's family, plus friends, fans and Philadelphia basketball legends, were at the Huntingdon Valley church to remember Gola as an outstanding man. Gola died Sunday afternoon at age 81. He is still the NCAA's all-time leading rebounder, and is one of only two men to win an NIT, NCAA and NBA championship.
SPORTS
December 15, 2013 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Webb doesn't rank up there with Tampa Bay's Joe Jurevicius in Eagles infamy, but the name brings back painful memories for the Birds. Now a Vikings wide receiver, the former backup has been getting a lot of press this week for his role in a 2010 Eagles loss as the Birds prepare for Sunday's game in Minnesota. Three years ago, the Eagles were 10-4, fresh off an emotional comeback victory over the New York Giants, and two wins from securing a free pass into the second round of the playoffs, along with home-field advantage.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Sparta A Novel By Roxana Robinson Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 400 pp. $27 Reviewed by Abby Frucht   Roxana Robinson's 2008 novel, Cost , tells the story of 22-year-old Jack Lambert's heroin addiction and the cost, both material and otherwise, it exacted on his mother, Julia. Feeling that she needs to "be everywhere, all the time . . . pulse thrumming," Julia follows Jack along the awful spiral of his illness, clinging to the brightness and vitality of his hair even as he takes her to the darkest places imaginable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Postwar Japan. Tokyo in ruins. U.S. soldiers arriving to take charge. "Let's show them some good old-fashioned American swagger," barks Douglas MacArthur, the five-star general in command of rebuilding the nation he has just destroyed, as he and his officers make their way from the air base to their new HQ. Tommy Lee Jones, in baggy Army browns, puffing on an extra-long corncob pipe, does his best to approximate the storied military man. ...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013
NO ONE'S expecting Monday's inauguration to top that bitter cold day in 2009 when Aretha Franklin rocked that gray, big-bowed hat as she belted out that soulful rendition of "My Country 'Tis of Thee. " And nothing will ever match the excitement we felt as the nation's first black president stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol and took the oath of office as his beautiful, young family watched. By the time President Obama gets sworn in again on Monday, it won't be the second but the fourth time he has taken the same oath.
NEWS
January 8, 2013
ANOTHER DAY, another Will Bunch column that name-calls, omits inconvenient facts and expresses his dream of one-party rule ("Best of the Blogs," Jan. 3). This time he has the GOP switching to the Democratic Party in droves, similar to the Democratic-to-Republican transition of the 1960s, because an aid bill for Hurricane Sandy rebuilding was postponed from Jan. 1 to Jan. 4 and Republicans were mad at their leadership. To start, Bunch's citing of an infamous newspaper headline is misleading, because about a month after the October 1975 "Ford to NYC: Drop Dead" headline appeared, President Ford asked for and got Congress to approve federal loans for the bankrupt city.
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