CollectionsHistory Teacher
IN THE NEWS

History Teacher

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Inga Sandvoss, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jack McCormack of East Goshen was awarded Delaware County Community College's Gould Award on May 20 during the college's commencement exercises. The Gould Award, established by the late founding trustee Jerry Gould, recognizes faculty whose commitment and achievments inspire both faculty and students. A $750 honorarium accompanies the award. McCormack, who first began his career at DCCC in 1967, teaches Western civilization and American history. He developed the college's popular Irish History and Civil War courses out of his own interest and extensive research.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Antoinette "Toni" Andreadis Pasles, 57, of Holland and formerly of Upper Darby, who was a telephone operator, history teacher, law librarian and employee of a tax-preparation firm, died Thursday at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. She had been fighting cancer for six years. "While in high school and later in college, she had been an operator for Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania and at a Woolworth's store," said her husband of 34 years, Aris Pasles. "Her parents were from a small community in Greece, and she was the first person in her family to attend college.
NEWS
December 15, 2010
William C. Grant Jr., 68, of Glassboro, a former high school history teacher in the Philadelphia School District, died of heart failure Friday, Dec. 10, at home. After graduating from Millersville University in 1965, Mr. Grant started teaching history at Strawberry Mansion High School. He later transferred to University City High School, where he retired from teaching in 1995. Mr. Grant "really cared about his students" and made history fun for them, said Dolores Murzyn, a longtime friend.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During summers in the 1960s, William J. Jordan took a break from teaching American history to South Jersey high school students and taught Revolutionary history to tourists in Philadelphia. The National Park Service gave him its uniform, its distinctive flat-brimmed hat, anointed him a seasonal park ranger, and assigned him to tours of Independence National Historical Park. "I know he loved that time in history," daughter Karen Jordan said. "He gave us all copies of the Constitution, his children," she said.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Z. "Flip" Fylypowycz, an Olney High School history teacher who lived the creed of family first and self second, died Monday of a heart attack. He was 46 and lived in the city's Spring Garden section. Joe taught 11th and 12th grades at Olney for nearly 20 years. He was good at his job because he loved history and loved kids. He had been an only child, coming to this country from the town of Lviv in the Ukraine at the age of 7 with his parents, Joseph and Josefa. Raised in the Spring Garden section, he graduated in 1961 from La Salle High School, where he had been a standout fullback.
NEWS
November 6, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy R. Jones, 73, of Mount Laurel, a former Lenape High School history teacher and school board member in two districts, died of cancer Tuesday, Nov. 2, at her home. "Community was Nancy," said Mount Laurel School Board President Ronald Frey. Mrs. Jones was one of Mount Laurel's biggest cheerleaders. She had lived there for 50 years, and her children and grandchildren went to area schools. She was elected to the Lenape School District board in 1980 and served for three consecutive three-year terms, all while working full-time as a property manager, raising a family, and taking night college courses.
NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Firpo R. Sjogren, 80, of Willingboro, a 20-year Army veteran who went on to teach American history in the Willingboro School District, died Friday, Oct. 1, at Care One Harmony Village in Moorestown. After teaching sixth grade for a year in his native Canal Zone, Mr. Sjogren joined the Army in 1953. He was stationed in Germany for several years and in various U.S. cities, and then served in the Vietnam War, said his son Cesar. He retired from military service in 1973 with the rank of chief warrant officer.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg and Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
After studying colonial times, fourth graders at the Shipley School learned firsthand how the colonists made their clothes. Using a spinning wheel she built from a kit, upper school history teacher Julia Murphy demonstrated how yarn is spun from a sheep's wool. She first showed students how wool looks after it has been shorn from a sheep, how is it combed and cleaned, and how it is dyed, using natural materials such as flowers and weeds. Murphy also told the 48 children that the word "spinster" was coined during colonial times to describe a 25-year-old woman who was unmarried and spun yarn to earn a living.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two young but experienced Russian ballet dancers plan to move to the township to teach in the classic style of their homeland. They have teamed with a college history teacher who wants to turn an old furniture store on a depressed strip of Long Lane into a performing-arts school. . She said she hoped to transform it this year into a studio not just for ballet but also for jazz and tap dancing, acting, modeling, aerobics and martial arts. "I think there might be a market and a desire for that in the area," Singer said.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For three weeks now, Mary Campbell's been practicing her buzzing. Every night right after dinner that's all she does. Sits in front of the TV and practices buzzing. Buzz, buzz, buzz . . . Sometimes she uses her fingers. Sometimes her knitting needles. Whatever will help her get a quick buzz. Campbell knows a slow buzz could mean a fast exit. And Campbell isn't big on fast exits. With a Bullwinkle watch ("my lucky charm") on her wrist and all kinds of "weird" knowledge in her head, the history teacher at Archbishop Ryan High School in Northeast Philadelphia leaves for Hollywood, Calif.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When George B. McLaughlin was a student at a small college in North Carolina in the early 1960s, he knew how to share his music. "He was a DJ on the college radio station for two years," his wife, Maryann, said. And although what is now Pfeiffer University was affiliated with the United Methodist Church, his program was named George's Orgy. In the school's town of Misenheimer, even as the Beatles were beginning their tidal wave, Mr. McLaughlin showcased his favorite: Elvis Presley.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Voters of tomorrow I am a junior at Science Leadership Academy at Beeber. My history teacher assigned my class to volunteer at the polls during the April primaries for whichever candidate we chose. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's websites required that I make a donation - as little as a dollar - to volunteer. I am 16, I don't have a credit card, and mailing a dollar was not allowed. Without options, I didn't volunteer and faced flunking the assignment.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE 11,000 MEMBERS of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers have been lulled to sleep by inaction, says the Caucus of Working Educators, a group within the union. And the caucus wants to shake things up, including challenging president Jerry Jordan and his team in next year's election. A group of candidates selected by the caucus' elections committee has embarked on a listening tour of the district to hear the concerns of PFT members. "We in the caucus have begun the process of waking ourselves up. It's a call to emergency and action to shift the culture of the union," said Kelley Collings, a caucus member and a math teacher at Feltonville School of Arts and Sciences.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO could read 15,000 books, give or take a few hundred, was a man to be reckoned with. And Larry Riley was that man. But how to do the reckoning? He was a man whose spiritual journey took him to a Trappist monastery, probably the strictist order in the Roman Catholic Church, yet he was also a man who enjoyed handicapping race horses and cheering on the steeds at Philadelphia Park and the old Garden State track. He earned a Ph.D with a dissertation on the Bolshevik show trials in the Soviet Union instigated by Joseph Stalin in the 1930s to get rid of his rivals.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During summers in the 1960s, William J. Jordan took a break from teaching American history to South Jersey high school students and taught Revolutionary history to tourists in Philadelphia. The National Park Service gave him its uniform, its distinctive flat-brimmed hat, anointed him a seasonal park ranger, and assigned him to tours of Independence National Historical Park. "I know he loved that time in history," daughter Karen Jordan said. "He gave us all copies of the Constitution, his children," she said.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A GROUP OF TEACHERS and staffers at Olney Charter High School yesterday filed a petition with the National Labor Relations Board requesting the federal agency conduct an election that would allow employees to become unionized. The filing included signed union authorization cards from Olney employees and stated that the new union would be part of the Alliance of Charter School Employees, an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers, according to the petition. More than 70 percent of the 150-person staff signed on to the effort, which may face a challenge from Olney's charter operator, ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin A. Yaffe, 87, of Mount Laurel, a history teacher at Pitman High School from 1955 to 1988, died Sunday, May 25, at home of non-Hodgkins' lymphoma. Mr. Yaffe grew up in the Feltonville neighborhood of Philadelphia and dropped out of Olney High School to enlist in the Navy during World War II. He worked as an electrician on the USS Zaniah, whose crews helped repair ships damaged in combat off the Philippines and Okinawa, surviving more than 100 attacks by kamikaze aircraft, his daughter Beth Glenn said in a phone interview.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When cellphones flashed "noon" in Ziaira Williams' history class, students shifted in their seats, exchanged glances, and then filed out into a hallway of purple and gold, launching a two-hour protest of Camden City School District layoffs. Williams' history teacher received a layoff notice Monday and said goodbye to his exiting pupils with silent pats on the back and nods of appreciation, Williams said. "They're glad we're doing this. They said, 'Go ahead,' and honestly, I don't care if I get in trouble - I want my teachers back," the 17-year-old junior said.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas G. Santoro, 64, of Philadelphia, a retired Cherry Hill history teacher, died Saturday, April 12, of multiple myeloma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Santoro taught in the Cherry Hill school system for more than 30 years at Joyce Kilmer Elementary and Carusi Middle Schools. He made ancient history come alive for his students. For example, for a lesson on Greek culture, students were allowed to dress up as Greek gods and goddesses. The death of Julius Caesar was told through a newspaper produced by students.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene L. Krawitz was the catcher for the Hawley High School baseball team in the late 1940s, in a game against Honesdale High in Northeastern Pennsylvania. "The bases were loaded. Louie Graff was our pitcher and my brother called for a pickoff at third base," Mr. Krawitz's older brother, Edwin, recalled. But his brother's throw sailed into left field and a run scored. An inning or two later, the bases were loaded again and the same thing happened. When the outraged Hawley coach met Eugene Krawitz and the pitcher on the mound, he asked what the heck was happening.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|