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NEWS
June 14, 1994 | BY WILLIAM KASHATUS
In its recent report, "Destination Philadelphia," the City Planning Commission concluded that the historic district needed to be revitalized in order to rekindle visitor interest. While private and government organizations have been quick to respond to this need with plans to preserve or restore the historic structures within Independence National Historical Park, they have been less willing to address a more pressing need: inspiring the general public through new ways of interpreting Philadelphia's history.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Karen Warrington
Some people are asking: How can the Philadelphia public school system mandate teaching African and African American history? But others of us are asking: How have school officials justified not teaching it in a school district where nearly two-thirds of all students are African American? America is so diverse that we should be teaching the stories of all its people, whether it is Greco-Roman history, including Greek mythology; Ireland's potato famine; the exodus of Eastern Europeans to America; or the roles so many other groups played here, including Italians, Germans, Asians and Latinos.
SPORTS
May 15, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
When the Montreal Canadiens turned the page on their first century earlier this season, Ken Dryden invited current members of the storied team to write their own history. "And why not make it great?" the Hall of Fame goalie suggested on the occasion of the Canadiens' 100th anniversary game against Boston on Dec. 4. Looks like the 2009-10 team took Dryden's advice to heart. Montreal has stunned the hockey world by reaching the Eastern Conference final for the first time in 17 years.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | By Kelly Wolfe INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Meg Basilio's eighth-grade world-history class, the assignment is to design a Web site devoted to local lore - with one seemingly contradictory rule: No research on the Internet. Students can arrange and coordinate their own field trips. They can find and interview historical experts. And they are welcome to scour books, magazines, newspaper clippings, and old files at the local library. But they are not allowed to draw any information from the medium for which they are writing.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By OWEN HARRIES, From the New York Times
As presidents approach the end of their terms in office, they tend to become preoccupied with the last campaign available to them: the one to insure their election by future historians into the ranks of All-Time Great Leaders. This seems to be happening to Ronald Reagan. The virtually unanimous reaction of the president's foreign policy constituency - the conservatives and "realists" - to this inclination to "play it for history" is to deplore it. They depict it as a dangerous weakness and sign of vanity in a man hitherto sound and resolute.
NEWS
January 5, 1988 | By Richard Cohen
It took the French to bring us down to Earth. The Frenchman who did that recently was Jean-Bernard Raimond, the foreign minister. At a NATO meeting after the Reagan-Gorbachev summit, Raimond refused to describe the accord on intermediate-range nuclear missiles as "historic. " Although he did not say so, his intent was clear: Leave it to history to decide what's historic. The French minister's apparent Gallic petulance came as a bracing antidote to what had been happening in Washington.
NEWS
November 19, 2002 | By Acel Moore
Great has been the controversy over whether and to what degree the full story of the African American role in our nation's history will be told at Independence National Historical Park. Now, another commemoration of that story is about to surface. "Only in this one we will not be just a footnote in American history - but a complete chapter," said the Rev. Jeffrey N. Leath, pastor of Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church at Sixth and Lombard. Mother Bethel, founded in 1787 by Richard Allen, is the first chartered African American church in the United States.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
Think how history might have changed if some heroes of history had reacted to their situations the way the Philadelphia Eagles' offense responded in the waning minutes of the Super Bowl: We'd still be British subjects. Imagine if it had been Paul Revere's 11 a.m. ride, because he'd had a leisurely breakfast of tea and crumpets before setting out on horseback for Lexington. "I say, chaps, I was wondering if you saw any Redcoats march through here looking for Samuel Adams?" Tom Hanks wouldn't have been in any movie called Apollo 13. Imagine if NASA engineers had responded to the "failure is not an option" moment with, "How 'bout we get back to you on Friday with a concept paper on options for dealing with the problem?"
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | By Dave Barry
I am the last person to criticize this nation's young people. I LOVE our young people, and I try to stay "hep" to their culture and their "slang lingo. " This is not easy, because the slang keeps changing. For example, here is a partial list of the phrases that have been slang for "good" in my lifetime: "swell," "neat," "keen," "hot," "cool," "boss," "stud," "bad," "groovy," "far out," "dynamite," "happening," "sweet," "rad," "awesome," "fly," "chillin'," "trippin'," "the bee's knees," "the bomb," "Puff Daddy" and "cutting the mustard.
SPORTS
February 3, 2009 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Super Bowl XLIII was seen by an estimated audience of 95.4 million people, second only to last year's game as the most-watched Super Bowl ever. Viewership peaked in the fourth quarter, when Arizona took the lead on Larry Fitzgerald's 64-yard touchdown reception, only to have it snatched back when Santonio Holmes' end zone leap gave Pittsburgh a 27-23 win. More than 100 million Americans were watching between 9:30 and 10 p.m., according to...
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