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NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Turkington, 63, of Collegeville, a Villanova University law professor for 27 years who was a leading expert on the First Amendment and privacy laws, died of cancer May 20 at home. "He was a pioneer in the area," said John Decker, a professor at DePaul University Law School in Chicago and a friend. "Nobody dealt as deeply or comprehensively with the issue of privacy as he did. " Professor Turkington wrote Teacher's Manual for Privacy and was contributing editor to AIDS, A Medical-Legal Handbook and AIDS, Law and Society.
NEWS
March 9, 2006 | By JILLIAN BAUER
HE'S A COLLEGE kid and he likes to get hammered. He goes out at night and a few beer bongs, car bombs and hours of sleep later, he wakes up in bed with a dry mouth, pounding headache and a craving for fried food. Throw a stranger into the morning-after equation, and he's lucky if he doesn't wake up with HIV. For the alcoholically abstinent, the dehydration, headaches and morning-after munchies sound like a pretty unfortunate condition to be in. For him, the typical drinking college student, he has normalized blackouts and hangovers and become accustomed to laughing it off. With just a mildly crummy hangover, he feels lucky to have escaped the standard serious risks related to drinking.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A SEPTA manager who is HIV-positive is suing the agency for invasion of privacy because a top executive there learned of the manager's illness by examining prescription records. The manager, who filed the federal suit under the pseudonym John Doe, is seeking unspecified damages, claiming the disclosure has placed him "under a dark cloud," his lawyer said. Before Judith Pierce, SEPTA's former chief administrative officer, learned of Doe's illness, Doe was "able to walk down those halls unafraid that people would shun him or wouldn't shake his hand or refuse to sit with him in the cafeteria," attorney Clifford A. Boardman told a jury of three women and five men. Pierce, who left SEPTA last summer for a similar job with the Los Angeles County Transit Authority, had no right to learn that Doe is suffering from the virus that leads to AIDS, Boardman said.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | BY MUBARAK S. DAHIR
I first met Jonathan Lax five years ago, soon after moving to Philadelphia. I was new to the city, a young, naive gay man eager to report on the myriad of social issues affecting my community. I knew that AIDS held a hauntingly central focus for the gay community, and that if I was going to report on gay life, I would have to become intimately involved with the struggle against this devastating virus. What I didn't know was how much one man, Jonathan Lax, would play in exposing me to the multi-faceted complications of AIDS: the political, medical, social, economic and, ultimately, personal struggles against the disease.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | By ALLEN BARRA
When I was 16, I walked into a Philadelphia gym for the first time and told a trainer (who made Burgess Meredith's trainer in Rocky seem like Cary Grant) that I wanted to learn to box. In about a half-hour's time I was properly shod, cupped, gloved and ready to step into the ring. "OK," I asked, "What's lesson number one?" My mentor placed his hand on the small of my back and shoved me into the ring. An instant before the bell rang, I heard him grunt, "Protect yourself at all times.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | By David E. Wilson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The freeholders yesterday cleared the way for Burlington County's first treatment center for patients with HIV. Doctors from the Kennedy Memorial Hospitals Early Intervention Program are set to begin operating a satellite office in the county's Raphael Meadow Health Center on Woodlane Road in Westampton on May 2. Doctors, along with nurses from Community Nursing Services in Mount Holly, will be on hand on selected days of the week to treat...
NEWS
July 11, 2011
Merck Inc., with headquarters in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and operations in the Philadelphia suburbs, said Monday that company researchers will collaborate with the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the University of California-San Francisco and seven other academic institutions to develop new approaches toward eradicating HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is the primary funding organization, though Merck will not receive any funding for its participation.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By SANFORD F. KUVIN
Until recently there was no reason to believe that patients had any reason to fear contracting the AIDS virus from infected health-care workers. That is no longer the case. Recently three people in Florida, who tested positive for HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS), have been linked to a dentist who died of AIDS in September. No one ever viewed HIV-infected health-care workers carrying out "invasive procedures" as a possible additional risk factor for the transmission of the AIDS virus.
NEWS
November 20, 2008 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
  It's easy for most of us to forget that, not too long ago, an AIDS diagnosis meant certain death. Sue Kehler remembers. She was one of dozens of people, mainly extras, in the 1993 film Philadelphia who had the disease or were HIV positive. She may be the only one left. "It was an experience that made me feel special," she says, recalling how Tom Hanks saw her feeling woozy, asked if she'd eaten, and demanded a break. Jonathan Demme wanted his groundbreaking film - the first big production about AIDS - to reflect reality.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A fierce opponent to a planned residence in New Hope for eight HIV-infected people yesterday reopened the bitter 18-month-old battle by filing a lawsuit in Bucks County Court against the project. At the end of October, the New Hope Zoning Hearing Board gave the green light to open the facility. Marion Eichlin, who lives next door to the canary-yellow, two-story house at 30 Old York Rd. proposed for the residence, said in her appeal that the eight future residents of that house would not meet the legal definition of a family, thus making the project illegal under the borough's zoning laws.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: My friend "Camilla" recently learned that she is HIV positive. She became aware of it through a blood test, as she is pregnant. The baby's father has been tested and he was negative. Her future health is of no concern because the situation is under control. Camilla hasn't been unfaithful, and it is clear she has been HIV positive for some time. My issue is, she refuses to contact her previous lover about her condition, even though she likely got it from him. Her ex may have no idea that he is positive and may not find out until it is too late.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In the biggest effort yet to find a cure for HIV, the National Institutes of Health on Wednesday named six large scientific teams, one led by Philadelphia's Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, to tackle different parts of the challenge. The government will commit $30 million a year for five years to the project. The Philadelphia collaboration will get $4.6 million a year. For years, with the world focused on getting treatment to millions of infected people and preventing further spread of the disease, the notion of a "cure seemed naive and overambitious," said Luis J. Montaner, the director of an HIV laboratory at Wistar, who will share leadership of the Philadelphia team.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
An Iraq War veteran in York County, Pa., has filed a federal lawsuit claiming she was denied a type of physical therapy because she has HIV. The 40-year-old woman, whose suit was filed under the pseudonym Bonnie Jones, said she sought help from OSS Orthopaedic Hospital in York for chronic spine pain and limited range of motion. She said the pain resulted from wearing a bulletproof vest for an extended period. Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, which operates physical therapy services at the hospital, and Timothy Burch, a physical therapist, also were named in the suit, filed by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 22, 2016
Scientists are planning a major study of an experimental HIV vaccine in South Africa later this year. The shots are based on the only attempted HIV vaccine ever to show even marginal effectiveness, in Thailand in 2009. The U.S. National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that its study in South Africa will use shots modified for better protection. Starting in November, 5,400 adult volunteers would receive five injections over a year, either vaccine or dummy shots. Results are expected in 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
Temple University researchers used a gene-editing technique to remove HIV DNA from the type of human immune cells where the virus can maintain a simmering reservoir of infection. The experiment, building on the researchers' previous HIV gene-editing work, was conducted in T cells growing in lab dishes. Whether it works in actual patients remains to be seen. Still, the study bolsters the concept that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can be cured, not just controlled in a latent stage by antiviral drugs.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Hahnemann University Hospital last week became the second transplant center in the nation to receive permission to use organs from HIV-positive donors. The organs would be given only to patients who also are HIV-positive and have agreed to accept them. The transplants will be part of research that will carefully monitor both the transplant and the potentially deadly disease. Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore announced last month that it would be the first to offer HIV-positive organs to HIV-positive patients on its waiting list.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Ann Soley Dellaira, 73, a former nursing teacher in Philadelphia and Camden County, died of cancer on Tuesday, Feb. 23, at Virtua Marlton Hospital. Born in Lansford, Carbon County, Pa., Mrs. Dellaira earned a bachelor's degree in nursing at Rutgers-Camden before teaching nursing at what is now Cooper University Hospital in the 1970s, her husband, Anthony, said. She earned a master's in psychiatric nursing at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1980s, he said, and became an assistant professor of nursing at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Javontae Williams, a 31-year-old gay black man, has seen plenty of statistics during his years in nursing school in Florida, as an undergraduate in sociology at Temple University, and in his graduate program in public health at West Chester University. Yet nothing has struck him like the news that at current rates, half of all black men who have sex with other men will be found to have HIV at some point. "The mind-set of it is, one in two, you are just waiting your turn," said the West Philadelphia resident, who is working full-time as a nurse on a geriatric unit and most definitely is not just waiting his turn.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - As many as 213 patients at Shore Medical Center may have been exposed to HIV or hepatitis because of drug tampering by an employee, the hospital said Thursday. The employee, who worked in the hospital's pharmacy, has not been identified publicly but has been terminated, according to a statement. "We have been working with public health authorities to determine if patients could have been exposed to blood-borne pathogens at Shore through contact with this employee's blood," said a statement issued by the hospital Thursday.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Developing a more specific gender-based marketing plan to engage minorities in clinical trials may increase participation. In a new study conducted by Temple University professor Sarah Bauerle Bass, minority men and women with HIV were interviewed about what they perceived as barriers to entering a medication clinical trial. The researchers then used a marketing technique called perceptual mapping to break down how the sexes differed in their responses. "Perceptual mapping allows us to tailor very specific messages to address exactly what issues are for specific groups," said Bass.
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