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Hiv Prevention

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NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drug prevents up to 96 percent of new HIV infections. It sounds like the answer to the prayers of those in danger of being infected, especially in Philadelphia, a national center for the epidemic. So why isn't Truvada - the drug in question - used more often? That was one of the issues discussed Wednesday at the 14th annual Prevention and Outreach Summit held by the HIV advocacy group Philadelphia FIGHT. The meeting at the Convention Center attracted 1,200 people and covered topics from education to the perils of sex work.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | BY ANNA FORBES
People ask about sexual transmission of HIV over and over for the same reason they buy new diet books - in the hope of hearing a different answer. It's hard, when trying to lose weight, to accept that one must eat less and exercise more. It's equally hard for people who are dating to accept that they should abstain from intercourse or use latex barriers to avoid HIV infection. For some women, using one of those two HIV prevention methods simply isn't possible. How many women do we all know who cannot ask a partner to use a condom because of cultural barriers, embarrassment, low self-esteem or lack of assertiveness?
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a major reform effort, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is requiring Philadelphia and five other cities to draw up comprehensive plans to prevent the spread of AIDS in their communities. The CDC is also requiring state health departments around the country - including New Jersey and Pennsylvania - to design plans of attack against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The plans - which the CDC will use in awarding an estimated $400 million nationwide for HIV prevention in 1995 - are to be developed by local and state health officials, with the help of those in their communities who are most at risk of contracting HIV. The states and cities will have to set objective criteria for measuring whether proposed prevention programs actually work.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Body bags lined the median strip in front of the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue Wednesday afternoon as about 200 protesters demanded Gov. Rendell restore $2 million in HIV education funding. State money for HIV prevention in Philadelphia was cut by $1.7 million during the last fiscal year, said Kate Kozeniewski, a spokeswoman for the AIDS activist group ACT UP! And the state's proposed budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year likely will cut $2 million from what initially had been $4.8 million, she said.
NEWS
May 20, 2010
By Elizabeth Clarey I always felt a responsibility to help others, and when I graduated from college in 2006, I decided to dedicate my career to that goal. For two years, I taught HIV prevention and sex education to young people in homeless shelters and detention centers in northern Virginia. But I wanted to make a greater impact, so I decided to head for the trenches of the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2009, I left for Tanzania, where I spent nine months teaching HIV prevention in a small rural village.
NEWS
August 3, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Francis J. "Frank" Renzi, a longtime AIDS activist and counselor, died July 21 of liver disease. He was 47 and lived in Center City. Renzi became a peer counselor at Hahnemann University's Partnership Comprehensive Care Clinic in 1999 and remained with the clinic until the spring, when his illness forced him to curtail his activities. He was a dedicated volunteer at Manna-Philadelphia, an AIDS nutrition program, and at the Mazzoni Center's Washington West Project, a health center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
NEWS
January 30, 2005
When white and black Americans join together for any reason (including something as simple as rooting for the Eagles), they often learn that their perceived differences are not so difficult to overcome. But then you learn of a survey on African Americans' attitudes about AIDS, and you begin to see how wide the gap between races can be on matters that both groups believe they understand. And you glimpse the hard work ahead on education, HIV prevention and access to quality health care.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Saturday night, and the city's young gay black men have plenty of options. A sex party is percolating in a private home, the "gyms" that have replaced bath houses are open for business, and an underground voguing competition is under way. Noel Ramirez and Quincy Greene know where the action is and understand its allure. But they understand the danger, too. Young gay black men are contracting HIV at twice the rate as their white and Hispanic counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Where do most people learn how to prevent AIDS? At the doctor's office? From television news programs? Over beer at the local bar? From supermarket tabloids? Do people who pick up a flier at, say, a local health fair, on ways to prevent the infection, understand the information? Faced with an increase in reported cases of both HIV infection and full- blown AIDS throughout the state, the New Jersey Department of Health is conducting an assessment of prevention programs to get answers to these and other questions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Hey, stud. Busy?" "Not really," Eiren Shuman, 27, coquettishly typed back in response to what he suspected was an automated message. "Sweet. I've been to the gym a lot, and it's made me really horny. " Some idle minutes later came another sext, asking whether Shuman wanted to view a key body part. He played along, just to prove his suspicion right. "Show me! Show me!" This service, called Grindr, is an app that gay and bisexual men use to hook up over the Internet.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drug prevents up to 96 percent of new HIV infections. It sounds like the answer to the prayers of those in danger of being infected, especially in Philadelphia, a national center for the epidemic. So why isn't Truvada - the drug in question - used more often? That was one of the issues discussed Wednesday at the 14th annual Prevention and Outreach Summit held by the HIV advocacy group Philadelphia FIGHT. The meeting at the Convention Center attracted 1,200 people and covered topics from education to the perils of sex work.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raenette Fields' voice cut through the din of neighbors chatting and tinkering with cars on 50th Street off Kingsessing: "Robert! Did you get tested, brother?" Fields is a gregarious woman who often sticks her nose in other people's business. But this was a whole new level of nosiness. The day before, curious about a big white van that was parked on the corner, she had encountered outreach workers who told her that zip code 19143, her neighborhood , had among the highest number of HIV/AIDS cases in the city.
NEWS
July 6, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Saturday night, and the city's young gay black men have plenty of options. A sex party is percolating in a private home, the "gyms" that have replaced bath houses are open for business, and an underground voguing competition is under way. Noel Ramirez and Quincy Greene know where the action is and understand its allure. But they understand the danger, too. Young gay black men are contracting HIV at twice the rate as their white and Hispanic counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Rachel Gouk
Saturday Pirates of Toms River "All Things Pirate," including music, sword-fighting, demonstrations, encampments, costume contests, and sing-alongs, will be a part of the Toms River Pirate Festival. This fund-raiser will assist Parents of Autistic Children and a children's cancer camp, Happiness is Camping. Performances are planned by the Sea Dogs, Capt. Jack impersonator Steven Dapcevich, and local groups Valhalla's Pirates and Pipes & Drums of Barnegat Bay. Events for children include face-painting, arts and crafts, and storytelling.
NEWS
August 3, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Francis J. "Frank" Renzi, a longtime AIDS activist and counselor, died July 21 of liver disease. He was 47 and lived in Center City. Renzi became a peer counselor at Hahnemann University's Partnership Comprehensive Care Clinic in 1999 and remained with the clinic until the spring, when his illness forced him to curtail his activities. He was a dedicated volunteer at Manna-Philadelphia, an AIDS nutrition program, and at the Mazzoni Center's Washington West Project, a health center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.
NEWS
May 26, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Body bags lined the median strip in front of the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue Wednesday afternoon as about 200 protesters demanded Gov. Rendell restore $2 million in HIV education funding. State money for HIV prevention in Philadelphia was cut by $1.7 million during the last fiscal year, said Kate Kozeniewski, a spokeswoman for the AIDS activist group ACT UP! And the state's proposed budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year likely will cut $2 million from what initially had been $4.8 million, she said.
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Elizabeth Clarey
I always felt a responsibility to help others, and when I graduated from college in 2006, I decided to dedicate my career to that goal. For two years, I taught HIV prevention and sex education to young people in homeless shelters and detention centers in northern Virginia. But I wanted to make a greater impact, so I decided to head for the trenches of the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2009, I left for Tanzania, where I spent nine months teaching HIV prevention in a small rural village.
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