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Hiv Status

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NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Rob Stephenson
There are many ways to show someone you love him. You could write him a song or have his name tattooed on your bicep. But how about getting tested for HIV with him? Since 2008, Dr. Patrick Sullivan and I at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University have been developing an innovative HIV-prevention strategy: couples HIV testing for gay men. Men who have sex with men are the only risk group in the United States to be experiencing an increase in HIV infections, and recent studies show that one- to two-thirds are infected by their main partners, a proportion that is significantly higher among young men. Meanwhile, for the last 30 years of the HIV epidemic, we in public health have focused our prevention messaging on the risks of casual sex. Some campaigns, like the ABCs of prevention (Abstinence, Be faithful, use Condoms)
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patients should be told that their doctor is infected with HIV only if there is clear evidence that the patients were exposed to the deadly virus, according to new guidelines developed by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Health. Released last week, the guidelines aim to balance the privacy rights of doctors with patients' risk of infection by an HIV-positive doctor - a risk the state says is extremely low. The guidelines, which cover all health-care workers, are advisory to hospitals and other health-care providers.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A patient alleges in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Philadelphia that a medical practice co-owned by Lancaster County's coroner discriminated against him and his family because he has HIV. The plaintiffs - identified as the patient, using the pseudonym Husband Jones, and his wife and daughter - say that after four previous visits, the patient returned Oct. 8, 2013, to Stephen G. Diamantoni M.D. & Associates Family Practice's Quarryville office...
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia AIDS activists are alarmed by allegations in a Common Pleas Court lawsuit that a hospital drug treatment counselor disclosed a patient's HIV status without permission. An unemployed drug-treatment patient last week filed the suit against Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and an ex-counselor, charging that the former counselor violated a confidence by telling another patient that she has the virus that causes AIDS. AIDS activists worry that the case may make people with the virus reluctant to seek testing or treatment at a time when HIV continues to spread, especially among the poor in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | BY ANNA FORBES
More Americans (513,486) have been diagnosed with AIDS than died in the last five wars combined (511,704 Americans died in the Persian Gulf, Vietnam, Korea and both world wars). And yet Kayode E-M Balogun (Guest Opinion, July 9) still describes people living with HIV as analogous to thieves and deserving of public shame. Just how many deaths will it take before AIDS is recognized throughout this country as an epidemic, a public health crisis, and not as some kind of moral judgment?
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
All sexually active men and women should undergo voluntary testing for AIDS infection and avoid intercourse with everyone except absolutely faithful mates who are free of the lethal virus, a report recommends today. While condoms probably reduce the risk of catching AIDS, they are no guarantee, and the only truly safe sex is sex with an uninfected partner or masturbation, said the report published in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Sex with a prostitute may be riskier than sex with a neighbor," the report concludes, "but if neither has been tested for HIV, then neither can be considered truly safe.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com
A 13-YEAR-OLD Delaware County honor-roll student was denied admission to the Milton Hershey School, which serves low-income students, because he's HIV positive, a federal discrimination lawsuit filed Wednesday in Philadelphia alleges. The complaint came the day before World AIDS Day, pointed out Ronda Goldfein, executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, which filed the suit. The boy sought admission to the Hershey school's residential program for this school year, according to the complaint, but was told that his application would not be considered because "[the student's]
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rapid home test for HIV, similar to early pregnancy tests, will be considered by a federal advisory committee on Tuesday, a move that many public health experts believe could eventually help calm Americans' fears of HIV, leading them to view it as just another serious chronic illness. An over-the-counter test offers new hope against an epidemic whose numbers in the United States have hardly budged in more than 15 years. An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of the more than 50,000 new HIV cases annually are transmitted by people who were unaware that they were infected.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
Two partners in the law firm that fired Scott Doe told a federal court jury that nothing exists in writing to show why Doe was dismissed. Dianne M. Nast, who serves as secretary to the board of the firm Kohn, Nast & Graf, testified that Doe, 30, did not have his contract renewed because of poor performance and not because he became HIV positive. Nast and another partner, Steven A. Asher, were called as hostile witnesses by Alan Epstein, Doe's attorney, who clashed repeatedly with them during a full day of bickering in the courtroom of U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop III. Epstein elicited testimony from both lawyers that the Kohn firm had nothing on paper justifying the decision to dismiss Doe in March 1993.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A patient alleged in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Philadelphia that a medical practice co-owned by Lancaster County's coroner discriminated against him and his family because he has HIV. The plaintiffs, identified as the patient, Husband Jones, his wife, and daughter, say that after four previous visits, he returned to Stephen G. Diamantoni, M.D., & Associates Family Practice's Quarryville office on Oct. 8, 2013, to get results of...
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not that the campers, counselors, and therapists who come together every year in Oxford, Chester County, had forgotten the reality of death that is part of living with HIV/AIDS. How could they? The mission of Camp Dreamcatcher is to provide care, services, and a fun seven days for youth affected by the disease. It had been more than a decade since Camp Dreamcatcher lost one of its own. Then, when counselor Evan Jones died three years ago at 22, his death shook the camp. The response was to turn grief into action.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
  As preschoolers, they sorted condom packets, not knowing what the plastic squares contained. Those early fund-raising walks proved too challenging, so they hitched a ride in a wagon. As they grew older and their fingers gained dexterity, they tied countless red ribbons. Twins Kevin and Keisha Diggs have become some of the AIDS Fund's most dedicated volunteers. They've stuffed envelopes, emptied trash cans, set up and hosted events, handed out literature, taken the stage to rev up audiences.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Rob Stephenson
There are many ways to show someone you love him. You could write him a song or have his name tattooed on your bicep. But how about getting tested for HIV with him? Since 2008, Dr. Patrick Sullivan and I at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University have been developing an innovative HIV-prevention strategy: couples HIV testing for gay men. Men who have sex with men are the only risk group in the United States to be experiencing an increase in HIV infections, and recent studies show that one- to two-thirds are infected by their main partners, a proportion that is significantly higher among young men. Meanwhile, for the last 30 years of the HIV epidemic, we in public health have focused our prevention messaging on the risks of casual sex. Some campaigns, like the ABCs of prevention (Abstinence, Be faithful, use Condoms)
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rapid home test for HIV, similar to early pregnancy tests, will be considered by a federal advisory committee on Tuesday, a move that many public health experts believe could eventually help calm Americans' fears of HIV, leading them to view it as just another serious chronic illness. An over-the-counter test offers new hope against an epidemic whose numbers in the United States have hardly budged in more than 15 years. An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of the more than 50,000 new HIV cases annually are transmitted by people who were unaware that they were infected.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was smart, ambitious, and poor. Thus, on paper, the 13-year-old applicant appeared to meet the basic criteria for admission to the well-regarded Milton Hershey High School for disadvantaged children. But he also happened to be HIV-positive, and on that basis the unidentified Delaware County teenager was denied entry into the boarding school founded by the nation's most-famous chocolate merchant. In a case that has generated national attention, the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania has filed suit in federal court, saying the school violated the Americans with Disabilities Act and "multiple antidiscrimination laws.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
A 13-YEAR-OLD Delaware County honor-roll student was denied admission to the Milton Hershey School, which serves low-income students, because he's HIV positive, a federal discrimination lawsuit filed yesterday in Philadelphia alleges. The complaint came the day before World AIDS Day, noted Ronda Goldfein, executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, which filed the suit. The boy was told that his application would not be considered because "[the student's]
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