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Hiv Testing

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NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Because of increased demand, the Chester County Health Department has expanded its free HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) counseling and testing service from 1 1/2 to two days per week. Testing and counseling for those at high risk for the AIDS virus began in the Personal Health Services portion of the health department in January, according to Jean Rabenau, supervisor of staff development. "I think the demand is growing slowly for all the AIDS services," Rabenau said. "It's not that we're being overwhelmed by numbers; it's just that we're increasing our service to the county.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
By Amy Nunn, Alyn Waller, and Luke Messac Last week, the Pennsylvania Senate brought the state a step closer to a much-needed modernization of HIV testing. The Senate passed a bill to amend Act 148, which requires individuals to give written informed consent before they can be tested for HIV. Adopted more than 20 years ago, the law was designed to protect patients' rights and privacy in an era when HIV-related discrimination was more common and effective treatment was not available.
NEWS
July 27, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania has revised its HIV testing law in an effort to increase early detection and treatment of people infected with the AIDS virus. The changes - the subject of intense debate and lobbying for two years - are in line with 2006 federal recommendations aimed at making HIV screening a routine part of health care rather than a stigmatized test given to "high risk" individuals in special clinics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that a fifth of HIV-postive Americans are unaware of their infection.
NEWS
February 14, 2007 | Judith Lightfoot
Judith Lightfoot is an infectious-disease specialist at the Garden State Infectious Disease Associates in Voorhees, and head of the American College of Osteopathic Internists' Task Force on Minority Health and Cultural Competency African American medical and political leaders gathered recently in Philadelphia at the National Conference on African Americans and AIDS to turn the national spotlight on the growing impact of HIV/AIDS on the black community....
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two new health clinics are open for business under one roof at 134 N. Fourth Ave. The clinics, run by the county Department of Health, offer HIV testing, inoculations for children and other services. The clinics are geared toward serving low-income families, said Cheryl Hensel, the supervisor of the department's Women, Infants and Children program, which runs a clinic twice a month at the site. At the WIC clinic, women with infants may receive food vouchers for their families.
SPORTS
March 7, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Greg Sirb, executive director of the Pennsylvania State Athletic Commission, calls it a "hot-button issue. " Larry Hazzard, who heads the New Jersey State Athletic Control Board, sees it as "a major health concern, almost pandemic in nature. " In the aftermath of the stunning news that high-profile heavyweight Tommy Morrison had tested positive for the virus that causes AIDS, almost everyone in boxing is chiming in with an opinion on the need, or lack thereof, for mandatory HIV testing for fighters.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett marked the midpoint of the 2011 legislative session yesterday by signing dozens of laws concerning a range of issues, including motorcycle sales, HIV testing, drunken driving and public meetings. The Republican signed 46 bills that lawmakers approved before adjourning last week for their summer recess. More than a dozen simply bestow official names on bridges and highway corridors, but others will affect many ordinary Pennsylvanians. Most of the laws take effect in 60 days.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In recent years, Bucks County has emerged as the only place in Pennsylvania where adolescents who feared they had contracted HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, were required to provide a parental-consent form before being tested for the disease. Next week, that will change. Health Director Lewis Polk said Tuesday the Bucks County Health Department will begin providing confidential HIV testing for minors who are worried they are carriers of the disease, following pressure from both the state Department of Health and AIDS activists.
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NEWS
June 29, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AFTER 10 YEARS as manager of Philly AIDS Thrift on 5th Street near Bainbridge, co-founder Christina Kallas-Saritsoglou is opening the city's first in-store HIV testing center today - on National HIV Testing Day. Decorated with the cool stuff she handpicked from the 15,000-square-foot store's massive array of furniture, paintings, clothing and kitsch, the fast, free, drop-in testing center is a far cry from a typical clinic. HIV testing will be administered by Action AIDS, Bebashi, GALAEI (Gay and Lesbian Latino AIDS Education Initiative)
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, hepatitis C kills significantly more Americans than HIV. Yet the liver-attacking virus doesn't get nearly the popular respect, or trigger the same fears. That understated reputation will be both a help and a hindrance as the public health community tries to control the spread of the virus. New cases of hepatitis C rose 150 percent between 2010 and 2013 nationwide, and even more in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. By far the highest rates of new cases, according to studies around the country, were among adolescents and young adults who inject drugs - particularly in rural areas.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a $25 million annual budget, Congreso de Latinos Unidos has a big impact in Hispanic and African American neighborhoods in North Philadelphia. Operating a health clinic and charter school, the nonprofit also offers programs dealing with parenting, housing, truancy avoidance, domestic violence, job preparation, drug abuse, mental health, after-school care, and HIV. Any one of the programs could have been a full conversation, but what Cynthia Figueroa, 40, Congreso's president and CEO, wanted to discuss was data and the importance of measuring whether programs actually made a difference in people's lives.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Justin Juozapavicius, Associated Press
TULSA, Okla. - Health officials Thursday urged an Oklahoma oral surgeon's patients to undergo hepatitis and HIV testing, saying filthy conditions behind his office's spiffy facade posed a threat to his 7,000 clients and made him a "menace to the public health. " The Oklahoma Board of Dentistry said Thursday that state and county health inspectors went to W. Scott Harrington's practice after a patient with no other known risk factors tested positive for both hepatitis C and the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved the first drug shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection, a milestone in the 30-year battle against the virus that causes AIDS. The agency approved Gilead Sciences' pill Truvada as a preventive measure for people who are at high risk of acquiring HIV through sexual activity, such as those who have HIV-infected partners. Public health advocates say the approval could help slow the spread of HIV, which has held steady at about 50,000 new infections a year for the last 15 years.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved an in-home rapid HIV test made by OraSure Technologies Inc., based in Bethlehem, Pa., for over-the-counter sales. This marks the first FDA approval for a rapid, over-the-counter diagnostic test that screens for infectious disease. The OraQuick In-Home HIV Test uses an oral swab and provides results in as little as 20 minutes. It is identical to the company's OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test — used by physicians and other professionals for the last 10 years — with new packaging and labeling, and the addition of consumer support services, including a 24/7 call center.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Would you go to a drugstore for an AIDS test? Health officials want to know, and they've set up a pilot program to find out. The $1.2 million project will offer free rapid HIV tests at pharmacies and in-store clinics in 24 cities and rural communities, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday. Officials are hoping that testing for the AIDS virus will become a routine service at drugstores, like blood pressure checks and flu shots.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging the need for new tools against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administration agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening device made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly acquired infections.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging public health workers' pleas for a new tool against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administation agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening test made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly-acquired infections to focus on a bigger picture.
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