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Hiv

NEWS
August 1, 2012
Philadelphia and two other cities with high rates of HIV are being awarded $1 million each over three years from the Merck Company Foundation for a new initiative intended to connect infected people with medical care. Health departments here and in Atlanta and Houston will use the money in different ways "to enhance existing efforts and foster other innovative approaches to better serve people living with HIV/AIDS and prevent its further spread," the foundation said. An estimated one-third of people with known infections are receiving health care and between 20 percent and 40 percent of patients fail to establish care within six months of receiving a diagnosis, according to the foundation.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | by April Adamson Daily News Staff Writer
The state Health Department is proposing regulations that would require people with HIV to report their condition to the state. At present, AIDs is among the 52 diseases and conditions now reported to the Health Department, but HIV, the precursor to AIDs, is not. "We met with members of the public throughout the state, and we carefully reviewed the experiences of other states where HIV is reportable," said Health Secretary Robert S. Zimmerman....
NEWS
February 13, 2004 | By Liza Barrie
HIV/AIDS is a humanitarian emergency almost beyond comprehension. Perhaps more than any other epidemic, it asks each of us: What is it to be human? On the eve of St. Valentine's Day, it asks: What is it to love? Two decades of HIV/AIDS haven't seen much loving. Not for the young woman stoned to death by neighbors for telling them she carried the virus. Not for the AIDS widow, robbed of her home and children. Not for the child orphaned by AIDS, abandoned and abused. Not for the laid-off worker, the patient turned away.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Saying he is "a victim of hysteria and discrimination," attorneys for "Dr. Doe" - an HIV-infected orthopedic surgeon at Mercy Catholic Medical Center - said yesterday they have started legal action against the center. "My freedom to care for patients, to practice my specialty, to make a living at the profession I have chosen and at which I have worked all my adult life has been taken from me," Doe said in a statement issued at a news conference, which the surgeon did not attend.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | By Tony Pugh, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
During his seven years in prison, Marco Fernandez has explained his weekly trips to the pharmacy and 27-pills-a-day drug regimen as the downside of a long battle with a liver disease. It is a ruse that allows the former drug dealer from Miami a strange measure of credibility and security from harassment at the Coleman Federal Correctional Institution in Sumpter County, Fla. His fellow inmates might pick on him if they knew he had AIDS. "You've got ignorant individuals in here, and they can sabotage you if they know you've got HIV," said Fernandez, who spoke freely with a reporter about his case.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | By Kofi Annan
In Philadelphia on Monday, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan addressed the Annual Conference of the Council on Foundations regarding his five objectives concerning the world AIDS crisis. Here are some excerpts from his talk: The first objective is prevention: to halt and reverse the spread of the virus, notably by mobilizing young people . . . The second is to stop the transmission of HIV from mother to child . . .. The third is to put care and treatment within everyone's reach.
SPORTS
April 27, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Hundreds of people will be tested for the AIDS virus after the arrest of an infected college basketball player in South Dakota on charges of having unprotected sex. Nikko Briteramos, 18, a freshman at Si Tanka-Huron University in Hurson, S.D., was arrested Tuesday and charged with five counts of knowingly exposing a woman to HIV. Briteramos, who is from Chicago, remained in jail yesterday on $10,000 bond. More than 50 people were tested Thursday, and none had any immediate sign of the virus, Gov. Bill Janklow said.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | By Bonnie McMeans FOR THE INQUIRER
Miguel, 17, still remembers the day he told his mother ? a woman he had never met - that he loved her. He was attending Camp Dreamcatcher, a week-long summer camp in Kennett Square for children infected with or affected by HIV/AIDS. A camp counselor suggested that Miguel send his mother, who had died of AIDS in prison, a message. Miguel wrote, "I love you, Mom" on a balloon, which he then released into the sky. The counselor's kindness and other memorable moments at Camp Dreamcatcher over 12 summers made such an impact on Miguel, that he decided to become a junior camp counselor this summer.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Making T-shirts at a factory in Northern Thailand, she earned $100 a month. So when she heard about the high-paying jobs available for Thai women in Japanese "snack bars," she jumped at the opportunity. It wasn't until she arrived here that the 25-year-old woman discovered she'd been sold into the Asian sex industry, by an agent - a middleman - she'd never even met. To pay back the $30,000 "debt" she owed for being given a job in Japan, she had to sidle up to Japanese men at local bars and then go to bed with them in nearby hotels.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Justin Juozapavicius, Associated Press
TULSA, Okla. - Health officials Thursday urged an Oklahoma oral surgeon's patients to undergo hepatitis and HIV testing, saying filthy conditions behind his office's spiffy facade posed a threat to his 7,000 clients and made him a "menace to the public health. " The Oklahoma Board of Dentistry said Thursday that state and county health inspectors went to W. Scott Harrington's practice after a patient with no other known risk factors tested positive for both hepatitis C and the virus that causes AIDS.
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