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Hiv

SPORTS
January 25, 2011
FORMER WBO heavyweight champion Tommy "The Duke" Morrison wants to resume his boxing career at 42, which on the face of it isn't as ridiculous as it might seem. George Foreman ended a 10-year retirement in 1987 and on Nov. 5, 1994, at the improbable age of 45, won a version of the heavyweight title for the second time by starching Michael Moorer in the 10th round. Ageless wonder Bernard Hopkins remains an elite fighter at 46. Heck, even 48-year-old Evander Holyfield is still active and making noises about how he can win the heavyweight championship for a record fifth time.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I see where the Philadelphia black clergy have started a very visible public-awareness campaign about the importance of getting tested for HIV, in hope of getting more people to talk about the dreaded A-word - inside and outside their places of worship. Well, it's about time. After all, HIV has historically been the huge elephant in the sanctuary. Don't ask, don't tell, and whatever you do, don't preach. But as the disease has soared to epidemic proportions, it simply can't be ignored anymore.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
A Temple University executive with professional and personal experience with AIDS will take over as interim director of the city's AIDS office on Monday, culminating a nine-month search to fill this position by Health Commission Estelle Richman. Jesse Milan Jr., senior assistant to Temple president Peter Liacouras and chief of staff since 1989, steps into a position that has been mired in controversy. Richman removed Richard Scott, the most recent director of the AIDS Activities Coordinating Office (AACO)
NEWS
May 17, 2004 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a secluded ranch above Placerita Canyon, a former supermarket cashier who calls herself Mia Beck was taking her first tentative steps toward her new career goal: porn star. Wearing a pink bikini, she sat in the shade of a live oak tree next to a pond, waiting her turn before the camera in Janine Likes Men. "I'm taking it slow. . . . I've talked to lots of girls in the business and they all said to start slow, not to be pressured into doing anything you're not comfortable with," said Beck, 20, two years out of high school and two months into her new job. "So I'm just doing girl-girl and solo scenes for now. And that way I don't have to worry about the condom thing.
NEWS
October 31, 1997 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
In keeping with federal guidelines, public health workers routinely ask people who test positive for HIV to notify their sex or needle-sharing partners that they may have been exposed to the virus that causes AIDS. The same procedure - called partner notification - is used for other sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis and gonorrhea. But under the same guidelines, infected people are not compelled to disclose the names of their sex or drug contacts. Such mandatory disclosure would discourage people from being tested, trample on privacy rights, and possibly generate false information, according to public health experts.
SPORTS
September 20, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
HIV-infected heavyweight Tommy Morrison yesterday vowed to return to the ring for "one last fight," just seven months after announcing he would never box again. Morrison has no date, no site and no opponent, but said he would fight to raise money to help children infected with the AIDS virus. "I know there's a lot people out there who probably are not going to like what I'm doing," Morrison said. "But they will have to listen to what I have to say. " His announcement came in the same hotel where in February he confirmed that he had tested positive for the AIDS virus and would retire with a 45-3-1 record.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A SEPTA employee yesterday accused the transit agency of compiling a list of workers who, like himself, are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, and of using that list to discriminate. The "AIDS List" was compiled by Judith Pierce, who allegedly "rifled through" employee prescription information and noted those employees who were receiving drugs used exclusively to treat HIV-related illnesses, according to a lawsuit filed yesterday in U.S. District Court. The employee who filed the suit - a manager using the name John Doe to protect his privacy - claims that he has been denied promotions and raises because of his HIV illness.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Would you go to a drugstore for an AIDS test? Health officials want to know, and they've set up a pilot program to find out. The $1.2 million project will offer free rapid HIV tests at pharmacies and in-store clinics in 24 cities and rural communities, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday. Officials are hoping that testing for the AIDS virus will become a routine service at drugstores, like blood pressure checks and flu shots.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Not having AIDS turned out to be almost as traumatic as actually having it for the man known as John Doe. When Doe found out that he had been misdiagnosed as being HIV positive, he went to pieces, he claims. He said he suffered "night sweats, nausea, loss of sleep, skin lesions, rashes, recurring headaches, hair loss, scalp irritation, recurring crying fits, and loss of concentration. " He also complained of "extreme anxiety, depression, belief that he was going to die of AIDS within a few years, post-traumatic stress disorder, permanent lack of trust in medical providers, despondency, humiliation, and social isolation.
SPORTS
March 22, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Tommy Morrison says he expects to reverse his HIV-positive status and return to boxing. Morrison said the virus that causes AIDS will disappear from his body and, "I believe that in about eight months I'll return to the ring. " Morrison made the comment on ESPNET SportsZone, a computer chat room. "I believe it's going to puzzle a lot of people. I believe I know how I got it, and I believe I know how to get it to disappear," Morrison said of the virus. "How do I make it disappear?
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