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Hiv

NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raenette Fields' voice cut through the din of neighbors chatting and tinkering with cars on 50th Street off Kingsessing: "Robert! Did you get tested, brother?" Fields is a gregarious woman who often sticks her nose in other people's business. But this was a whole new level of nosiness. The day before, curious about a big white van that was parked on the corner, she had encountered outreach workers who told her that zip code 19143, her neighborhood , had among the highest number of HIV/AIDS cases in the city.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly half of high school students say they've had sex, yet progress has stalled in getting them to use condoms to protect against the AIDS virus, government researchers reported at the International AIDS Conference Tuesday. Today, four of every 10 new HIV infections occur in people younger than 30, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - and the teen years, just as many youths become sexually active, are key for getting across the safe-sex message.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved the first drug shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection, a milestone in the 30-year battle against the virus that causes AIDS. The agency approved Gilead Sciences' pill Truvada as a preventive measure for people who are at high risk of acquiring HIV through sexual activity, such as those who have HIV-infected partners. Public health advocates say the approval could help slow the spread of HIV, which has held steady at about 50,000 new infections a year for the last 15 years.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved an in-home rapid HIV test made by OraSure Technologies Inc., based in Bethlehem, Pa., for over-the-counter sales. This marks the first FDA approval for a rapid, over-the-counter diagnostic test that screens for infectious disease. The OraQuick In-Home HIV Test uses an oral swab and provides results in as little as 20 minutes. It is identical to the company's OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test — used by physicians and other professionals for the last 10 years — with new packaging and labeling, and the addition of consumer support services, including a 24/7 call center.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Would you go to a drugstore for an AIDS test? Health officials want to know, and they've set up a pilot program to find out. The $1.2 million project will offer free rapid HIV tests at pharmacies and in-store clinics in 24 cities and rural communities, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday. Officials are hoping that testing for the AIDS virus will become a routine service at drugstores, like blood pressure checks and flu shots.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Allyn Gaestel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the long, lethal history of the AIDS epidemic, only one human has ever conclusively beaten the disease: Timothy Brown. A gay American man in Berlin, Brown was on the brink of death from leukemia and HIV in 2006 when he was given a novel treatment that rebooted his immune system, simultaneously curing him of both diseases. Now 46, Brown has since been poked, prodded, and tested by experts around the world, and been declared healthy, albeit with lingering side effects from his care.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A potential pathway to breast cancer treatment discovered by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University contains so many intriguing elements that it is easy to lose count. Here are three: It treats the cancer with existing HIV drugs. It operates not by killing cells or slowing their growth, but by blocking their journey to other parts of the body, where they become deadly. It works against a particularly aggressive category of breast cancers, known as triple negative, for which there are no targeted therapies.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
In a speech before 200 clergy, former mayor W. Wilson Goode encouraged the faith community to cast stigma aside and speak up on behalf of people living with HIV/AIDS. Goode, who is now an ordained minister, made the remarks Saturday at a conference for clergy hosted by Philadelphia FIGHT, an AIDS service organization. The group's Second Annual Conference for Faith Leaders to Focus on HIV featured workshops on women and youth issues, fear in the church, and how to start an HIV/Aids ministry.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was in a single gesture of holding hands that evangelist Darlene King first felt the stigma of her HIV diagnosis. The Germantown minister's eyes were closed and her fingers were entwined with those of other church women as they stood in a circle and prayed during a women's breakfast. King admitted her HIV status as she cried. When the minister opened her eyes, she said, the women who were standing beside her had stepped away. So King was heartened on Saturday as she sat in a room full of clergy who had come together to learn about how the faith community can cast aside stigma and enlist congregations in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
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