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Hiv

NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Violette Carb and Noelia Rivera got married - for the first time - two and a half years ago. "It wasn't legal, obviously," Carb said. But the two Philadelphia women had been together for seven years, and they wanted to commit. At Sunday's Pride Day festival, less than a month after a federal judge struck down Pennsylvania's ban on same-sex marriage, the 24-year-old women tied the knot again. This time, Carb will be covered by Rivera's health insurance. Fourteen couples - who had been together 119 years - were wed on Independence Mall during a glitter-filled parade.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
Undetectable. If you have HIV, that's as good as it gets. It means the amount of human immunodeficiency virus in your body is so low that it can't be detected by a standard blood test. It's been suppressed by antiretroviral drugs, but it's still there, in trace amounts, hiding in blood and tissue. That intractable last bit of virus - called the "viral reservoir" - persists in the face of current treatments. "It's a marker of why we cannot cure HIV," says Luis Montaner, an HIV researcher at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers have snipped out a single gene in patients' immune cells to make them partly resistant to infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The study, in this week's New England Journal of Medicine, bolsters hope for controlling HIV without daily antiviral drugs - a so-called functional cure. But even more important, as the first paper to report the modification of an exact spot in human DNA, it marks the arrival of the age of gene editing.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Trishula Patel, For The Inquirer
When Ofole Mgbako, a fourth-year medical student, saw a patient having trouble breathing, he was at a loss about how to treat him. Back in the States, he would have ordered tests that would come back in 30 minutes or less and been able to draw up a care plan. But in Botswana, where Mgbako, 26, was spending his summer with a University of Pennsylvania program, these tests were not always available. So he used his physical-exam skills to judge what drugs to prescribe, and the man soon recovered from respiratory distress.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'I just wanted to get full ownership of my man, Ron, and see him from the inside out," says Matthew McConaughey , speaking of Ron Woodroof , the real-life figure he plays in Dallas Buyers Club . A cowboy, a cutup, a cokehead, a womanizer, Woodroof worked as an electrician, partying furiously, hanging with the rodeo crowd, a guy "without a purpose," McConaughey says. And then Woodroof is told he has HIV, and has, at most, 30 days to live. "Frankly, we're surprised you're even alive," the doctors in the hospital say. For McConaughey, understanding who Woodroof was became an obsession.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Hey, stud. Busy?" "Not really," Eiren Shuman, 27, coquettishly typed back in response to what he suspected was an automated message. "Sweet. I've been to the gym a lot, and it's made me really horny. " Some idle minutes later came another sext, asking whether Shuman wanted to view a key body part. He played along, just to prove his suspicion right. "Show me! Show me!" This service, called Grindr, is an app that gay and bisexual men use to hook up over the Internet.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Eileen Ng, Associated Press
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Two HIV-positive patients in the United States who had bone marrow transplants for cancer have stopped antiretroviral therapy and still show no detectable sign of the AIDS virus, researchers said Wednesday. The Harvard University researchers stressed it was too early to say the men had been cured but said it was an encouraging sign that the virus had not rebounded in their blood months after drug treatment ended. The first person reported to be cured of HIV, American Timothy Ray Brown, underwent a stem-cell transplant in 2007 to treat his leukemia.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Michelle Suttles, 68, of Logan, a former assistant to two city councilwomen, died Tuesday, June 25, at Einstein Medical Center of heart failure. Born in Swainsboro, Ga., Mrs. Suttles earned a bachelor's degree in mass-media communications from the Agricultural and Technical University of Greensboro, N.C., and completed a master's degree in health administration at Temple University. From January to August 2012, Mrs. Suttles was director of constituent services for Philadelphia Councilwoman Cindy Bass.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drug prevents up to 96 percent of new HIV infections. It sounds like the answer to the prayers of those in danger of being infected, especially in Philadelphia, a national center for the epidemic. So why isn't Truvada - the drug in question - used more often? That was one of the issues discussed Wednesday at the 14th annual Prevention and Outreach Summit held by the HIV advocacy group Philadelphia FIGHT. The meeting at the Convention Center attracted 1,200 people and covered topics from education to the perils of sex work.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court seemed conflicted Monday on the question of whether the federal government can force groups that receive funding for overseas anti-HIV/AIDS programs to adopt its views against prostitution and sex trafficking. And Chief Justice John Roberts pointed out the quandary, asking the first question to each of the lawyers arguing the case. Deputy Solicitor General Sri Srinivasan said that Congress decided to renounce prostitution and sex trafficking because they contribute to the spread of diseases.
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