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Hiv

NEWS
August 7, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of the Milton Hershey School apologized to an HIV-positive student who was denied admission because of his condition and said he was welcome to attend the residential school in the fall if he still wanted to. President Anthony Colistra said in a statement that he made the offer in a July 12 letter to the boy and his mother. The school originally said that its residential setting and the risk of sexual activity made the teen too much of a "threat. " The change of heart may have been motivated by a lawsuit filed by the AIDS Law Project on behalf of the boy in November in Philadelphia District Court, alleging that the school violated the Americans with Disabilities Act, which includes HIV. The student, who is now 14 and lives in Delaware County where he attends public school, is considering the offer but is also looking at other options, said his lawyer, Ronda Goldfein.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Philadelphia and two other cities with high rates of HIV are being awarded $1 million each over three years from the Merck Company Foundation for a new initiative intended to connect infected people with medical care. Health departments here and in Atlanta and Houston will use the money in different ways "to enhance existing efforts and foster other innovative approaches to better serve people living with HIV/AIDS and prevent its further spread," the foundation said. An estimated one-third of people with known infections are receiving health care and between 20 percent and 40 percent of patients fail to establish care within six months of receiving a diagnosis, according to the foundation.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | Reviewed by David L. Ulin
Our Kind of People A Continent's Challenge, a Country's Hope By Uzodinma Iweala Harper Collins. 240 pp. $24.99   About halfway through Our Kind of People: A Continent's Challenge, a Country's Hope , a stunning inquiry into the AIDS crisis in sub-Saharan Africa, Uzodinma Iweala makes the thrust of his investigation clear. "I found his words interesting," he writes of a Nigerian politician who blames the disease's spread on long-distance truckers and rest-stop sex workers, "because they seemed to externalize both the epidemic and its primary means of transmission - sex. By focusing on these groups of people that Nigerians traditionally consider promiscuous or of lax morality, he seemed to suggest that normal people with normal monogamous sexual relationships exist outside the reach of the virus.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raenette Fields' voice cut through the din of neighbors chatting and tinkering with cars on 50th Street off Kingsessing: "Robert! Did you get tested, brother?" Fields is a gregarious woman who often sticks her nose in other people's business. But this was a whole new level of nosiness. The day before, curious about a big white van that was parked on the corner, she had encountered outreach workers who told her that zip code 19143, her neighborhood , had among the highest number of HIV/AIDS cases in the city.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly half of high school students say they've had sex, yet progress has stalled in getting them to use condoms to protect against the AIDS virus, government researchers reported at the International AIDS Conference Tuesday. Today, four of every 10 new HIV infections occur in people younger than 30, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - and the teen years, just as many youths become sexually active, are key for getting across the safe-sex message.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved the first drug shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection, a milestone in the 30-year battle against the virus that causes AIDS. The agency approved Gilead Sciences' pill Truvada as a preventive measure for people who are at high risk of acquiring HIV through sexual activity, such as those who have HIV-infected partners. Public health advocates say the approval could help slow the spread of HIV, which has held steady at about 50,000 new infections a year for the last 15 years.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved an in-home rapid HIV test made by OraSure Technologies Inc., based in Bethlehem, Pa., for over-the-counter sales. This marks the first FDA approval for a rapid, over-the-counter diagnostic test that screens for infectious disease. The OraQuick In-Home HIV Test uses an oral swab and provides results in as little as 20 minutes. It is identical to the company's OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test — used by physicians and other professionals for the last 10 years — with new packaging and labeling, and the addition of consumer support services, including a 24/7 call center.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Would you go to a drugstore for an AIDS test? Health officials want to know, and they've set up a pilot program to find out. The $1.2 million project will offer free rapid HIV tests at pharmacies and in-store clinics in 24 cities and rural communities, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday. Officials are hoping that testing for the AIDS virus will become a routine service at drugstores, like blood pressure checks and flu shots.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Allyn Gaestel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the long, lethal history of the AIDS epidemic, only one human has ever conclusively beaten the disease: Timothy Brown. A gay American man in Berlin, Brown was on the brink of death from leukemia and HIV in 2006 when he was given a novel treatment that rebooted his immune system, simultaneously curing him of both diseases. Now 46, Brown has since been poked, prodded, and tested by experts around the world, and been declared healthy, albeit with lingering side effects from his care.
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