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Hiv

NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quadruple-dose flu vaccine for the elderly also provides better protection for people with HIV, researchers reported Tuesday in the first of several studies to publish results of high-dose vaccine for people with compromised immune systems. The team of researchers from Philadelphia institutions will ask a federal advisory committee to recommend high-dose vaccination for HIV-positive people, said Pablo Tebas, an infectious-diseases physician at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and senior author of the paper in Annals of Internal Medicine.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Three female AIDS activists saying that they wanted to highlight the "naked truth" about potential spending cuts in HIV programs were arrested Tuesday after taking their clothes off in the lobby of House Speaker John Boehner's office. The trio had the words "AIDS cuts kill" painted on their bodies and had linked arms with four men who also disrobed as part of the protest. The nude protesters, along with dozens of other clothed demonstrators, chanted slogans, including: "People with AIDS are under attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question : I remember when Magic Johnson was diagnosed with HIV in the early 1990s. I thought it was his death sentence. Two decades later, he is healthy and the virus is completely under control with the medication he takes. Have we reached a point where people living with HIV can have normal life expectancies? Answer: Potentially, yes. We've come a long way since 1983, when the HIV virus was first identified. In 1986, AZT (Zidovudine) became the first drug available to treat HIV. Unfortunately, it wasn't effective enough in combating the AIDS virus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
While it may be that some Americans doubt we're related to chimps and other primates, viruses recognize the similarities in our cells. The more closely two species are related, the more easily infections jump between them, said biologist Edward Holmes, who just moved from Penn State to the University of Sydney. For us humans, that means we're particularly vulnerable to catching diseases from other primates. HIV, for example, in various strains has jumped from primates to humans in at least 12 separate incidents.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Corbett administration has provided no help or alternatives for those hurt by the governor's decision to cut funding that paid for medication and other critical needs, the poor and their advocates told state officials Thursday. On Aug. 1, Gov. Corbett ended the state's General Assistance program, which had provided $205 a month to 70,000 Pennsylvanians. Since then, former recipients have been going without medication for diseases such as HIV and can't pay for basic needs, advocates told state officials in a meeting at the Department of Public Welfare Offices in Center City.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Milton Hershey School for impoverished children will pay $700,000 to settle a federal lawsuit filed by a 14-year-old Delaware County boy who claimed he was denied admission last year because of HIV. The school also will pay $15,000 to the federal government to settle potential civil penalties. The Justice Department investigated the boy's complaint and determined that the Hershey School violated provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act, or ADA, in denying the boy admission, according to the settlement.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer
A HIGH-SCHOOL freshman from Delaware County and his mother will receive $700,000 from the Milton Hershey School in central Pennsylvania after the school denied the boy admission based on his HIV-positive status, the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania announced Wednesday. The 14-year-old honor-roll student was rejected in 2011 by the school, which said he would pose a "direct threat" to other students because of his illness. The anti-discrimination lawsuit against the school, founded by the chocolate mogul in 1909 in Hershey, Pa., was filed by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania in November.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Just because some businesses are labeled "small" doesn't mean they aren't trying to solve some big problems. Consider Radnor-based Novira Therapeutics Inc. , which is developing antiviral drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B and HIV infections. Both are serious conditions. There were about 34.2 million people worldwide living with HIV infection in 2011, including about 1.2 million in the United States. Hepatitis B infection, which is rare in the United States thanks to infant vaccinations, attacks the liver and is a major health problem in Asia, particularly China.
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