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NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court seemed conflicted Monday on the question of whether the federal government can force groups that receive funding for overseas anti-HIV/AIDS programs to adopt its views against prostitution and sex trafficking. And Chief Justice John Roberts pointed out the quandary, asking the first question to each of the lawyers arguing the case. Deputy Solicitor General Sri Srinivasan said that Congress decided to renounce prostitution and sex trafficking because they contribute to the spread of diseases.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Justin Juozapavicius, Associated Press
TULSA, Okla. - Health officials Thursday urged an Oklahoma oral surgeon's patients to undergo hepatitis and HIV testing, saying filthy conditions behind his office's spiffy facade posed a threat to his 7,000 clients and made him a "menace to the public health. " The Oklahoma Board of Dentistry said Thursday that state and county health inspectors went to W. Scott Harrington's practice after a patient with no other known risk factors tested positive for both hepatitis C and the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Rob Stephenson
There are many ways to show someone you love him. You could write him a song or have his name tattooed on your bicep. But how about getting tested for HIV with him? Since 2008, Dr. Patrick Sullivan and I at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University have been developing an innovative HIV-prevention strategy: couples HIV testing for gay men. Men who have sex with men are the only risk group in the United States to be experiencing an increase in HIV infections, and recent studies show that one- to two-thirds are infected by their main partners, a proportion that is significantly higher among young men. Meanwhile, for the last 30 years of the HIV epidemic, we in public health have focused our prevention messaging on the risks of casual sex. Some campaigns, like the ABCs of prevention (Abstinence, Be faithful, use Condoms)
NEWS
January 3, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A quadruple-dose flu vaccine for the elderly also provides better protection for people with HIV, researchers reported Tuesday in the first of several studies to publish results of high-dose vaccine for people with compromised immune systems. The team of researchers from Philadelphia institutions will ask a federal advisory committee to recommend high-dose vaccination for HIV-positive people, said Pablo Tebas, an infectious-diseases physician at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and senior author of the paper in Annals of Internal Medicine.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Three female AIDS activists saying that they wanted to highlight the "naked truth" about potential spending cuts in HIV programs were arrested Tuesday after taking their clothes off in the lobby of House Speaker John Boehner's office. The trio had the words "AIDS cuts kill" painted on their bodies and had linked arms with four men who also disrobed as part of the protest. The nude protesters, along with dozens of other clothed demonstrators, chanted slogans, including: "People with AIDS are under attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question : I remember when Magic Johnson was diagnosed with HIV in the early 1990s. I thought it was his death sentence. Two decades later, he is healthy and the virus is completely under control with the medication he takes. Have we reached a point where people living with HIV can have normal life expectancies? Answer: Potentially, yes. We've come a long way since 1983, when the HIV virus was first identified. In 1986, AZT (Zidovudine) became the first drug available to treat HIV. Unfortunately, it wasn't effective enough in combating the AIDS virus.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
While it may be that some Americans doubt we're related to chimps and other primates, viruses recognize the similarities in our cells. The more closely two species are related, the more easily infections jump between them, said biologist Edward Holmes, who just moved from Penn State to the University of Sydney. For us humans, that means we're particularly vulnerable to catching diseases from other primates. HIV, for example, in various strains has jumped from primates to humans in at least 12 separate incidents.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Corbett administration has provided no help or alternatives for those hurt by the governor's decision to cut funding that paid for medication and other critical needs, the poor and their advocates told state officials Thursday. On Aug. 1, Gov. Corbett ended the state's General Assistance program, which had provided $205 a month to 70,000 Pennsylvanians. Since then, former recipients have been going without medication for diseases such as HIV and can't pay for basic needs, advocates told state officials in a meeting at the Department of Public Welfare Offices in Center City.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Milton Hershey School for impoverished children will pay $700,000 to settle a federal lawsuit filed by a 14-year-old Delaware County boy who claimed he was denied admission last year because of HIV. The school also will pay $15,000 to the federal government to settle potential civil penalties. The Justice Department investigated the boy's complaint and determined that the Hershey School violated provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act, or ADA, in denying the boy admission, according to the settlement.
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