IN THE NEWS

Hiv

NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging the need for new tools against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administration agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening device made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly acquired infections.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging public health workers' pleas for a new tool against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administation agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening test made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly-acquired infections to focus on a bigger picture.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rapid home test for HIV, similar to early pregnancy tests, will be considered by a federal advisory committee on Tuesday, a move that many public health experts believe could eventually help calm Americans' fears of HIV, leading them to view it as just another serious chronic illness. An over-the-counter test offers new hope against an epidemic whose numbers in the United States have hardly budged in over 15 years. An estimated 50 to 70 percent of the more than 50,000 new HIV cases annually are transmitted by people who were unaware that they were infected.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, researchers have shown that they can suppress the AIDS virus by bolstering patients' immune systems, while taking them off standard antiviral drugs. The small, six-month-long study, led by scientists at the Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, put patients on interferon, an old drug with nasty side effects. Interferon by itself had not worked against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, in previous studies. The researchers can only speculate about why their protocol - which initially gave antivirals and interferon together - was effective.
NEWS
February 15, 2012
Any trial in the case of the Delaware County teenager who has sued the Milton Hershey School for denying him admission because he is HIV-positive should be held in Philadelphia, his attorney contends. The school has asked U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, where the suit was filed, to move the trial to Harrisburg, about 15 miles from the boarding school founded by the famous chocolate merchant, and thus closer to key witnesses involved in the operation of the school. But in an opposing petition filed Monday, lawyer Ronda Goldfein said the move "would simply shift the inconvenience of a two-hour commute" to "a low-income family.
NEWS
February 11, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Colcher, 84, of Center City, medical director of Valley Forge Medical Center & Hospital, died Monday, Feb. 6, of heart failure at Hahnemann University Hospital. In 1958, Dr. Colcher joined what was then Valley Forge Medical Center & Heart Hospital as chief of surgery. He became medical director in 1966 after the death of his father-in-law, Joseph Wolffe, the hospital's medical director and founder. In 1973, Valley Forge Medical Center changed its mission to providing treatment to adults with substance abuse and associated physical, social, and psychological disorders.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Milton Hershey School said it was well aware that people with AIDS have been victims of "discrimination arising from ignorance. " But the boarding school founded by the nation's most-famous chocolate merchant insisted it nonetheless acted properly in denying admission to an HIV-positive Delaware County teenager. In its recently filed response to a lawsuit, the school said the case "requires a realistic examination of teen sexuality" and the "inability to control consensual sexual activity . . . in the unique residential setting.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Bob Ray Sanders is a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, was truly remarkable this year for several reasons - mostly good, but at least one bad thing. It was the day George W. Bush returned to Africa, a continent that benefited greatly from his unprecedented HIV/AIDS initiative; President Obama committed to a major increase in funding for treatment of HIV here at home. That's the good news. Also on that day, in a bizarre act that had nothing to do with HIV/AIDS, the world's largest human-rights organization made a complete fool of itself by calling for Bush's arrest.
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