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Hiv

NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A potential pathway to breast cancer treatment discovered by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University contains so many intriguing elements that it is easy to lose count. Here are three: It treats the cancer with existing HIV drugs. It operates not by killing cells or slowing their growth, but by blocking their journey to other parts of the body, where they become deadly. It works against a particularly aggressive category of breast cancers, known as triple negative, for which there are no targeted therapies.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
In a speech before 200 clergy, former mayor W. Wilson Goode encouraged the faith community to cast stigma aside and speak up on behalf of people living with HIV/AIDS. Goode, who is now an ordained minister, made the remarks Saturday at a conference for clergy hosted by Philadelphia FIGHT, an AIDS service organization. The group's Second Annual Conference for Faith Leaders to Focus on HIV featured workshops on women and youth issues, fear in the church, and how to start an HIV/Aids ministry.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was in a single gesture of holding hands that evangelist Darlene King first felt the stigma of her HIV diagnosis. The Germantown minister's eyes were closed and her fingers were entwined with those of other church women as they stood in a circle and prayed during a women's breakfast. King admitted her HIV status as she cried. When the minister opened her eyes, she said, the women who were standing beside her had stepped away. So King was heartened on Saturday as she sat in a room full of clergy who had come together to learn about how the faith community can cast aside stigma and enlist congregations in the fight against HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging the need for new tools against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administration agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening device made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly acquired infections.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory committee on Tuesday unanimously approved over-the-counter sale of a rapid HIV test, acknowledging public health workers' pleas for a new tool against an epidemic that is driven largely by people who don't know their status and infect others. If the Food and Drug Administation agrees with its advisers, the oral swab screening test made by OraSure Technologies Inc. of Bethlehem, Pa., would become the first infectious disease test approved for home use. The panel overcame considerable unknowns and concerns that the test cannot pick up newly-acquired infections to focus on a bigger picture.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rapid home test for HIV, similar to early pregnancy tests, will be considered by a federal advisory committee on Tuesday, a move that many public health experts believe could eventually help calm Americans' fears of HIV, leading them to view it as just another serious chronic illness. An over-the-counter test offers new hope against an epidemic whose numbers in the United States have hardly budged in over 15 years. An estimated 50 to 70 percent of the more than 50,000 new HIV cases annually are transmitted by people who were unaware that they were infected.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, researchers have shown that they can suppress the AIDS virus by bolstering patients' immune systems, while taking them off standard antiviral drugs. The small, six-month-long study, led by scientists at the Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, put patients on interferon, an old drug with nasty side effects. Interferon by itself had not worked against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, in previous studies. The researchers can only speculate about why their protocol - which initially gave antivirals and interferon together - was effective.
NEWS
February 15, 2012
Any trial in the case of the Delaware County teenager who has sued the Milton Hershey School for denying him admission because he is HIV-positive should be held in Philadelphia, his attorney contends. The school has asked U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, where the suit was filed, to move the trial to Harrisburg, about 15 miles from the boarding school founded by the famous chocolate merchant, and thus closer to key witnesses involved in the operation of the school. But in an opposing petition filed Monday, lawyer Ronda Goldfein said the move "would simply shift the inconvenience of a two-hour commute" to "a low-income family.
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