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Hives

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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Naomi L. Jenkins, Special to The Inquirer
The aroma of hot beeswax and honey mingled in the air as 13-year-old Frank Oranzi, an assistant beekeeper, methodically sliced the wax covering off hundreds of honeycombs with an electrically heated knife. When the bees fill the honeycombs, they seal them. "What we want to do is slice those caps off to expose the open cells of honey," another beekeeper instructed. It was the annual honey extraction at the historical Grange Estate in Havertown. For more than 15 years, Beverly Rorer has been attending the five beehives at the 10-acre estate.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
While America worries about the onslaught of killer bees, farmers and apiarists here are concerned about bee killers. For the second year in a row, beehives brought to Variety Farms in Hammonton have been sabotaged by pesticides. Last year, six million bees were killed when someone sprayed 100 hives with an insecticide. This year, about one million bees - 40 percent of those sprayed - were killed. The victims were bees in 50 hives belonging to Gary Bradshaw of G Bee's Honey Farm in Stockton.
NEWS
June 17, 2002 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Aside from the music, the Hives' Friday night show at Transit had all the trappings of the ascendant rock phenom: desperately packed crowd jockeying for position, line winding around the block, and disgruntled fans locked out of the fun. But what was most striking about the Swedish rockers' set was its sheer predictability. The 45-minute onslaught did exactly what one would expect from this latest in the recent rash of garage punk success stories - crank up the volume and rip through their affable, paint-by-numbers Stooges ripoffs without bringing anything new to the material.
NEWS
May 31, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here in the self-proclaimed blueberry capital of the world, on the biggest blueberry farm of its kind in the world, the mysterious disappearance of the honey bee could have spelled disaster. Instead, tanned and burly Bobby Galletta walked down a line of bushes while, all around, the air was busy with bees. He could hear their nonstop, sotto voce hum. "This is the deal," he said, pulling apart a tiny white flower. "The bee goes in here to get the nectar. . . . It will hit the pollen on the way in. . . . " The bees were pollinating Galletta's Atlantic County blueberries - as they had Pennsylvania's apples - prompting a sigh of relief among agriculture officials.
NEWS
February 5, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Something is killing the nation's honeybees. Dave Hackenberg of central Pennsylvania had 3,000 hives and figures he has lost all but about 800 of them. In labs at Pennsylvania State University, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and elsewhere in the nation, researchers have been stunned by the number of calls about the mysterious losses. "Every day, you hear of another operator," said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, acting state apiarist with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It began at a breakfast table in Devon, in September 2004, soon after Bart Houlahan's father died of esophageal cancer. Houlahan's wife's parents were visiting, talking about the beehives that they nurtured as a hobby at their home outside Leesburg, Va. "They remarked they had a ton of honey," Bart recalled, "and didn't know what to do with it. " A eureka moment struck. "My youngest daughter, Carly, . . . suggested that we sell it for charity," Bart said. "And my other [daughter]
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I have a question about white chocolate. Do you know if it contains caffeine? And is it the caffeine in coffee and tea that acts as a diuretic? A: Caffeine, as well as being a stimulant, is also a diuretic; it stimulates the kidneys to excrete fluid. Ordinarily, the amount of caffeine in coffee and tea (and some soft drinks) does not cause any particular health problems; however, people who consume large quantities of the beverages (more than four cups a day) are likely to experience jitteriness and an enhanced diuretic response.
LIVING
November 10, 1992 | By Tina Kelley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Walt Wilson, work resembles an earthy religious ceremony. With smoke rising around him, he moves deliberately, surrounded by smells and sounds - the burning pine needles, the spicy honeycombs that smell like the woods after a good rain, the background buzz, and, occasionally, the bee in his ear - he has forsaken the veil. "They don't bother me," he said. He moves like Gulliver, nonchalantly suffering the stings and arrows of outrageous insects. Wilson has worked as a bee inspector for New Jersey for the last 19 years.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The air is fresh cut grass and wild onions, and new green appears sparsely on the roadsides, as if blotted on with a sponge. In the orchards, the tamed trees are lush in bloom. Between them are wooden boxes of various colors, and from them the bees have begun their work. That means Bob Harvey has started his, as well. Harvey, who runs Harvey's Honey here in Salem County, is one of the last commercial beekeepers in South Jersey. Most nights from now until the end of the growing season, he'll deliver truckloads of hives to farmers who grow crops such as cranberries, blueberries, apples, cantaloupes, cucumbers and squash, crops that need the bees to pollinate their blooms for a strong harvest.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Beekeepers in Hammonton have been hit by the state's first major infestation of varroa mites, agricultural officials said. The varroa mite, which kills or cripples the developing young of the honeybee, can destroy a hive in two years if it is not discovered and treated with the chemical fluvalinate. Dennis Wright, a Hardingville beekeeper, said 2,000 of his 2,200 hives were infested while the bees were in Florida for the winter. He said Florida inspectors had certified the bees as mite-free when he left in mid-April.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  William A. Slimm Jr., 82, of Riverside, owner of the Busy Bee Apiary in Riverside, died of complications from dementia on Sunday, April 26, at the Cinnaminson Center for Genesis HealthCare. Mr. Slimm ran the honey-making business from his home but kept his hives on farms in Cinnaminson, Cherry Hill and Delran, his wife, Laura, said. In his best years, she said, he had more than 200 hives, but because of a widespread mite infestation of recent years, he was down to 55 or 60 at the time of his death.
NEWS
September 23, 2014
M ELISSA ALAM, 26, of Drexel Hill, is founder of the women-focused website Femme & Fortune and a branding/consulting business. Next month, the 2010 Temple grad is opening the Hive, a co-working space for female entrepreneurs, on Race Street near 2nd, in Old City. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the Hive? A: I'd been working at Impact Hub, in Kensington, and realized that sitting in one spot is more productive, and the community helped me reach out to a programmer or designer if needed.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Back-to-school energy pervades September - even decades past graduation. For Jews around the world, this sense is heightened by the overlapping of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah, literally "head of the year," celebrates ending and beginning again. As part of the annual High Holiday rituals of taking stock, making amends, and looking forward there are opportunities for feasting and fasting, and always there are wishes for a "sweet new year. " That translates at the table to a widespread tradition of eating apples and honey, and other treats at the holiday table.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Local bee people tout Philadelphia as "the cradle of American beekeeping," since Lorenzo L. Langstroth patented the removable-frame hive here in 1852. It's still used today. Langstroth would likely be thrilled by the new local wave of urban beekeeping, as the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild, founded just five years ago, now counts nearly 150 members. Only a handful, though, are pros. Among them is Don Shump, owner of the Philadelphia Bee Co., who manages up to 100 hives at 15 apiaries across the city - when he's not mesmerizing audiences with a buzzing beard of swarming bees.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cute part was the kids running around with fake antennae on their heads and yellow and black striped vests with wings on the back. The serious part was the discourse on how hives work and what's new with colony collapse disorder. For the eating part, visitors could sample the differences among Roxborough honey, Manayunk honey, West Philly honey, and Blue Bell honey. There was a drinking part, too. Mead, anyone? There were honeybees. And wannabees. For five years, the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild has thrown an annual fest to celebrate bees and educate the community about the peril they're in. Saturday, the event landed at Germantown's Wyck historic house, garden, and farm, a 2.5-acre oasis of green that just happens to have 15 hives.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
NORTHWEST PHILLY is buzzing - in a very literal sense. Just ask Anaiis Salles, the Germantown beekeeper who has built the better beehive at her base of operations at the Awbury Arboretum, on Awbury Road near Chew Avenue in East Germantown. "Philly itself is such a green city," Salles said, "but in Germantown and Mount Airy, we have lots of gardeners, and it creates a very good place for bees, with plenty of foraging. " Last June, Salles, the founder and operator of Awbury's Green Sanctuary Community Apiary, won a $15,000 federal research grant through the University of Vermont.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
NEWARK, Del. - A lone honeybee, its wings wet and its mind likely muddled, crawled across a porch on Old Cooches Bridge Road yesterday, a seemingly safe haven amid the bee-pocalypse all around. Just 100 yards away, across the busy lanes of Interstate 95 near the University of Delaware, the scene along a northbound on-ramp resembled a tiny battlefield after a major conflict. Bees clung to a gnarled guardrail, barely moving, while others tried to fly between the raindrops, in and out of the many smashed, wooden hives spilled all over the small strip of grass.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
First came a bumblebee. Then, a honeybee settled onto the purple coneflower in Cynthia Cronin-Kardon's garden Sunday. She checked her watch and logged the sighting. Cronin-Kardon was counting bees. She was doing her part to contribute data to what has become one of the nation's most pressing entomological questions: What's happening to its bees? In 2007, commercial beekeepers began to document huge losses among their managed honeybee hives, in what later became known as colony collapse disorder, or CCD. It was a huge concern for agriculture, given that humans owe roughly one bite of food in three to the pollination work of honeybees.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Michael Klein and PHILLY.COM
The last time the Whole Foods Market in Wynnewood was buzzing like this was three summers ago when movie star Reese Witherspoon and then-flame Jake Gyllenhaal shopped for groceries on a Sunday afternoon. This time, the buzz is literal. Last week, store manager Adam Squire lugged a bee hive — about 20,000 bees encased in a wooden box slightly larger than a cat carrier — up a narrow staircase to a spot on the roof. About 30 feet above ground, it overlooks the Amtrak and SEPTA train tracks and the store's chronically congested parking lot. Squire, whose hobby is beekeeping, is taking Whole Foods' holistic approach to the food chain to heart — and to work.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Being a good neighbor sometimes means having to get rid of your bees. That's what happened over Memorial Day weekend when Plymouth Township police officers responded to a Sandwood Road home where two bee hives were added late in March, much to the consternation of neighbors. A mass of bees two feet wide and three feet long left hive and home on Saturday May 26th and swarmed in a pine tree next door. Their queen had died, and the swarm took off in search of new digs, said Police Chief Joseph F. Lawrence.
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