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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The air is fresh cut grass and wild onions, and new green appears sparsely on the roadsides, as if blotted on with a sponge. In the orchards, the tamed trees are lush in bloom. Between them are wooden boxes of various colors, and from them the bees have begun their work. That means Bob Harvey has started his, as well. Harvey, who runs Harvey's Honey here in Salem County, is one of the last commercial beekeepers in South Jersey. Most nights from now until the end of the growing season, he'll deliver truckloads of hives to farmers who grow crops such as cranberries, blueberries, apples, cantaloupes, cucumbers and squash, crops that need the bees to pollinate their blooms for a strong harvest.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Beekeepers in Hammonton have been hit by the state's first major infestation of varroa mites, agricultural officials said. The varroa mite, which kills or cripples the developing young of the honeybee, can destroy a hive in two years if it is not discovered and treated with the chemical fluvalinate. Dennis Wright, a Hardingville beekeeper, said 2,000 of his 2,200 hives were infested while the bees were in Florida for the winter. He said Florida inspectors had certified the bees as mite-free when he left in mid-April.
NEWS
May 24, 2007 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Center City remains a very desirable place. Just ask the bees who have been swarming downtown lately. Over the last couple of days, thousands of Italian honeybees have come to Center City, most likely looking for a place to establish their hives. In the end, it wasn't a good fit. It all started Tuesday morning, when thousands of bees appeared on a tree outside Liberty Place at 17th and Chestnut Streets. That's when Nancy Schnarr of the Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Association was called in. She sawed off the tree limb and drove off with the bees in tow. Yesterday, another swarm showed up about noon on a planter outside the Borders bookstore at Broad and Chestnut Streets.
NEWS
October 15, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The high-pitched shrieks that greeted Maroon 5's arrival at the Spectrum on Saturday night left no doubt that the L.A. quintet can make tweens swoon with the best of them. But while they owe a good chunk of their success to the heartthrob appeal of singer Adam Levine (and the rest to their inescapable breakthrough single, "This Love"), Maroon 5 can play their instruments as well as pose with them. They're the boy band that actually is a band. Maroon 5's influences aren't difficult to spot, particularly Levine's affinity for Stevie Wonder's high-register quaver, but they mix and match exuberantly.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rich Fleming was a youngster growing up in Delaware County during the 1950s and 1960s, his parents made him join the 4-H Club. He didn't really like the idea, especially since he didn't live on a farm and had no ambition of becoming a farmer. He disliked the idea even more when he found out he would be taught all about a subject that didn't exactly spark his interest. The subject was bees. Today, Fleming, now 41, is thankful to the 4-H Club. For now he's a beekeeper.
NEWS
March 4, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
In winter, queen bees don't need to migrate to St. Croix to bask in 90-degree temperatures. Instead, they're surrounded by their colony of worker bees that will use their wings to generate heat for their royal highness. This is just one of the strange and wonderful lessons new beekeepers were taught at the sixth annual Chester County Beekeepers Association meeting, held at Westtown School on Feb. 24. About 116 beginning and experienced beekeepers gathered for a daylong series of seminars on topics like "How to Find the Queen," "Bee Sex 101" and "Honey Production.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | By Beth Arburn Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Within a few weeks, commercial beekeeper Dennis Keeney will know whether disaster has visited his Bethel, Pa., apiary again. Normally, the Berks County beekeeper loses from 2 percent to 10 percent of his colonies over the winter, typically because cold kills the bees in the hives. But last year Keeney lost about 400 of the nearly 1,000 hives he and his partner owned. Keeney blames the loss of about 300 of the hives on a parasite called the tracheal mite. The mite causes blockage in, and punctures the walls of, a bee's trachea, or breathing tube, either killing the insect or leaving it weak and susceptible to disease.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jesse Taylor was in a hurry to get his cargo north from southwest Florida on Sunday, and nobody was about to stop him. Even a South Carolina state trooper, who pulled up to Taylor's speeding 18-wheeler with his lights and sirens wailing, decided to keep on going when he got a closer look. Perhaps it was Taylor's passengers. All 24 million of them, buzzing and feeling testy. After all, their bellies were still full with the nectar of Florida orange groves, and the heat from their long journey was still trapped in their hives.
NEWS
August 11, 2008 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The buzz in Cherry Hill is coming from Seth Belson's backyard - more precisely, from his 18 beehives. Belson, 43, is the beekeeper who gained some attention when a hive that fell off a truck on the New Jersey Turnpike last month was given to him so he could care for the survivors. Belson could not find the hive's queen, so he combined the remaining bees into one of his own hives. Since 1991, Belson has worked as a lawyer for the New Jersey Public Defender's Office, representing defendants against charges ranging from felony shoplifting to homicide.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Newlyweds filed suit in Montgomery County Court yesterday, contending that an "unsafe" suntan cream gave them rashes that sent the bride to the hospital and kept them from enjoying the full benefits of their honeymoon. Brian and Emily Barger of Pennsburg are asking the court to award them damages of more than $90,000 to cover their medical expenses, physical pain and mental anguish due to their loss of "conjugal consortium" during the honeymoon. The lawsuit names Solar Suncare, the Miami-based manufacturer of No-Ad Waterproof Sun Tanning Cream, and Kmart, whose Quakertown store sold the couple the lotion one day before their wedding.
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