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Hoagie

NEWS
September 1, 1995 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Hoagie day at a Philadelphia prison almost turned into a riot, the head of the city's prison guards union said yesterday. Inmates on three cellblocks at the Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center refused to eat lunch on Wednesday when they were served the prison's allegedly lame version of Philly's favorite sandwich, according to William Turner, president of Local 159 of AFSCME District Council 33. Far from the familiar, meat-and-cheese-stuffed cholesterol-laden...
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Augie DiCostanza's left hand is overflowing with Genoa salami, which he is about to deposit on a 10-inch roll, already prostrate on the counter in front of him, sliced open from top to bottom and covered in sharp provolone. On the salami will be added layers of capicola and prosciutto, topped by tomatoes, onions, oregano and peppers, hot or sweet. It's called the original Italian hoagie - emphasis on original - and DiCostanza is the third generation in a family that has been making the sandwich the same way in Delaware County for nearly 80 years.
NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By Therese Greenberg
The historic American experience. Free live concerts. Skyscrapers. Old-looking buildings. Street art. Both rude and polite people . . . These words, taken from a tourist's Internet travel diary about his visit to Philadelphia, left me feeling homesick in Austin, Texas, about 1,600 miles away. The history and culture, the beat of a city as old as the nation. That's my Philadelphia. I have lived in several states - California, Washington and now Texas for about three-and-a-half years - but I'll always be a Philly girl.
NEWS
May 2, 2004 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sign in the window at 1605 Walnut St. appeared Thursday: "COMING SOON. " By the weekend, Rittenhouse Row was roiling. Quiznos Sub, the baked-hoagie maker with sub shops opening all over the world, announced that it was moving to the tony blocks that are the city's premier shopping area, stretching along Walnut from Broad to 20th. Takeout hoagies in the land of Alma de Cuba, Le Bec-Fin, Ralph Lauren and Tiffany's? Talk about a row. "I was the first one to come to Walnut Street," said restaurateur Georges Perrier, who moved to Walnut in 1983.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Palm Beach it's not. There was no caviar, no original artwork, no air kissing and no sign whatsoever of Prince Charles. Or the Kennedys. Or even Roxanne Pulitzer. But, hey, this is South Jersey. What do you expect? They don't even call this place a club. It's the Hidden Pond Polo Center. The preferred cuisine is hoagies and beer; the furniture, blankets and beach chairs; the attire, shorts and T-shirts. No pretenses here. That's because here, in Winslow Township, amid the cornfields and the vegetable stands and down the street from a Wawa, a local guy named John Rosado has brought polo, the game of kings, to the masses.
NEWS
December 9, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a crowded sandwich-eating world of hoagies, grinders, subs, heroes, and po'boys, Norristown's own zep flies somewhat beneath the radar. But in certain quarters, the intensely local, seven-decade meat-on-a-roll tradition is so closely associated with its birthplace to qualify as the Montgomery County version of Proust's madeleine. "You take any Norristown kid from the '50s and you give him now, 50 years later, a zep," said Jerry Spinelli, 68, a children's book author and Norristown native, "and he will be transported back to his hometown.
FOOD
September 25, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Chef John Hilburt looked down on his creations lined up in a neat row on a table in the main kitchen of the Elwyn Institute. The dishes ran the gamut - spaghetti with a crown of three meatballs; a hunk of frosted chocolate cake; a hoagie with neat layers of meat, cheese and lettuce, and a hearty platter of Salisbury steak and gravy with mashed potatoes, peas and carrots. While the food looked delicious, it was the taste test that proved to be the big surprise. For these foods were made entirely of pureed ingredients.
FOOD
October 10, 2001 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
Stop the tourism-brochure presses: Philadelphia, we have learned, is the home of the nation's 34th-best restaurant. So says the October issue of Gourmet magazine, which rolls out its list of America's 50 Best Restaurants and assigns each a ranking, like tennis players in a tournament. The only Philadelphia spot to make the list, at No. 34, is ?Pasi?n!, the Center City Nuevo Latino restaurant co-owned by its chef, Guillermo Pernot, and Michael Dombkoski. ?Pasi?n! won raves for its ceviches, conch fritters, mixed grill, and braised baby goat, finishing behind Blackbird in Chicago and ahead of La R?ve in San Antonio.
NEWS
July 1, 2003 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Industrial spies in Bavaria heist automotive designs. In the Silicon Valley, they take computer programs. And around here, apparently, hoagie-roll recipes. An underhanded search for a better bun, Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor said yesterday, helps to explain why Mazen Fathi Said was being held on $2 million bail last night. Said, who operates a small bakery in Greensboro, N.C., has been arrested on charges of burglary, theft of trade secrets, and related offenses stemming from what Montgomery County prosecutors said were five uninvited visits to Norristown's Morabito Baking Co. during a 24-hour period that began June 14 at 4:21 a.m. According to law-enforcement documents, Morabito cameras videotaped the 30-year-old Said swiping three-ring binders containing 66 recipes used at the 71-year-old family-owned plant, which distributes dinner rolls and other breads under a variety of names in 28 states.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
WACO, Texas - He had a month's growth of facial hair, almost unrecognizable to anyone who knew him. When Shawn Oakman was called to Bill O'Brien's office at Penn State in March 2012, he was barely able to look up at his coach and his uncle. The highly touted recruit out of Penn Wood High was embarrassed. He was tossed from the Penn State football program for attempting to steal a $7 hoagie from a convenience store - the last straw in a host of incidents. Even then, there was some denial.
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