CollectionsHoagie
IN THE NEWS

Hoagie

BUSINESS
July 27, 2008 | By Joseph DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wawa sells 70 million hoagies a year. "If you know anyone who makes more, I'd like to meet them," says Philadelphia bread-factory owner Leonard Amoroso Jr. Wawa does big business in Cokes, smokes and gasoline. But what sets it apart from 7-Eleven, Sunoco's Atlantic mini-marts, or the Pantry 1 chain that occupies discarded Wawa stores is the labor-intensive fresh-hoagie counter. Which depends on hoagie rolls. Until recently, most Wawa hoagies were served on rolls made by Amoroso's Baking Co. at its 55th Street plant in Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 21, 2008 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chris Myers has an easy smile and quick handshake at the VFW post in Mount Holly. He's comfortable being among fellow veterans as they pick up tuna and Italian hoagies at the post fund-raiser. Myers, 42, of Medford, is a candidate in the Republican primary on June 3 to replace retiring Republican U.S. Rep. Jim Saxton in the Third District seat. A former Navy lieutenant, Myers is a Gulf War veteran. He's running in a district that has almost 95,000 retired and active military men and women and their families, a number his campaign says is the highest concentration of military voters in the state.
NEWS
March 6, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis and Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
They will feast on hoagies and cheesesteaks by the thousands. They will catnap on hotel linens. Spend lavishly on TV ads. Shell out for police overtime and storm local copy centers. For the next seven weeks in Pennsylvania, and especially in delegate-rich Philadelphia, the campaigners and journalists chronicling the race for the Democratic presidential nomination will spend millions of dollars as Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton pursue victory in the state's now-coveted primary.
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel Amoroso Sr., 91, president of Amoroso's Baking Co., died Tuesday at his home in Wynnewood. Amoroso's bread - crusty outside, soft inside - has been a Philadelphia tradition since Mr. Amoroso's Italian immigrant grandfather, Salvatore, fired up a brick oven in West Philadelphia almost 100 years ago. As a child, Mr. Amoroso learned to shape dough and shove it into a big, brick oven with a wooden paddle. Later, he dropped out of Overbrook High School to deliver bread to homes in Italian neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007
SO THE Chain Gang breaks the bank on its Big Italian extravaganza two weeks ago and within a week the company announces it needs to sell the building. Coincidence? We're not taking any chances. We're eating hoagies. And we're going to Slack's Hoagie Shack. Actually we're going right by Slack's Hoagie Shack, twice driving by the strip mall location at 2499 Aramingo Ave. Calling two hours ahead, we go pick up 12 sandwiches and three salads (yes, Gangsters ordered salads)
NEWS
August 18, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
When I turned on the television and the picture quality was so poor that Lawrence Welk looked like Pamela Anderson, I told myself that things would eventually get better. When my children couldn't see "Mama's Family" through blizzardlike screen interference, I convinced them to turn it off and watch Solomon's Family instead. When my wife, LaVeta, said that she considered public television stations to be premium channels, I knew she was putting a happy face on our sad situation.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wyncote Mini Deli in Ogontz offered customers more than the standard hoagie and chips: For an extra $25, police said, you could buy a bag of marijuana to go with your meal. But you had to know the code: Simply add a child-sized, barrel-shaped container of Hug juice to your groceries and another $25 to your payment. "You had to do it at the same time," said Philadelphia Police Capt. Chris Werner Narcotics Field Unit II. And his officers did, he said. Time and time again.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: Merion Square Gourmet Foods, Gladwyne. What we like about it: For hungry diners looking for takeout variety, Merion Square Gourmet Foods offers a wealth of choices with its hot and cold buffet menu and sandwiches. Menu items are made fresh by owners James and Kun Ji, who opened the takeout-only restaurant 11 years ago after moving from South Korea in 1989. Daughter Debbie Choi is the manager. The salad bar and hot buffet are open for business from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
NEWS
April 16, 2006 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: The Bensalem shop bakes its bread on the premises daily and serves specials from Sicilian 16-inch, deep-dish pizza to the Woodhaven hoagie. The restaurant's theme is Philly sports, and the walls of the dining area and takeout counter are decorated with team shirts and photos. What we like: Champs' soft pizza dough is the perfect resting place for cheese, sauce and a range of toppings, including plum tomatoes and spinach. Combo pizzas include Boardwalk Sausage featuring sausage, peppers and onions, and the Honey BBQ Chicken and Pineapple Pizza, each $9 for a 12-inch pie. Among sandwich offerings are the Woodhaven hoagie featuring turkey, ham and cheese ($3.73 for a mini, $5.95 for a half, and $11.90 for a whole)
NEWS
August 28, 2005 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: Frosty Falls, an ice cream and sandwich shop in Bridgeport. What we like about it: Located in a two-story Victorian-style building with outdoor tables and benches overlooking the river, this is a friendly spot to cool down and relax on a hot summer day. The family-owned business features up to 14 flavors of made-on-the- premises water ice, including Cry Baby, a sour red-raspberry treat. There are also 15 flavors of hard ice cream, from the old-fashioned vanilla to the unusual Phillies Grand Slam, a sweet-tooth favorite of graham-cracker- flavored ice cream with chocolate candies.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|