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Holiday Village

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NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holiday Village, a community for people age 55 or older, will mark National Night Out with a celebration this Tuesday, where residents will be informed about how to avoid becoming crime victims. Several communities in South Jersey are sponsoring events by town watch groups. And Mount Laurel is hosting Burlington County's launch of National Night Out from noon to 4 p.m. today in a rally in Laurel Acres Park. At Holiday Village, although the community has never been overrun with crime, eight years ago, a few attempted burglaries spurred residents such as Len Moser to organize the group.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A four-day search for a missing elderly man ended yesterday when members of his family discovered he was on holiday at his brother's home in Melbourne, Fla. Francis Carman, 81, disappeared from his home in the Holiday Village adult community after 6 a.m. Monday - the time he takes his daily walk around the Mount Laurel neighborhood. Police, emergency personnel and volunteers spent the week searching the Holiday Village area, which is near the intersection of Union Mill Road and Elbo Lane.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | By Eileen Reinhard, Special to The Inquirer
When Peter Hovnanian shows off the work his building company has completed, he can point to houses, whether small and cozy or large and grand, that are the kind of dream homes people are willing to buy even before ground is broken. Hovnanian is clearly proud of the national award-winning developments of color-coordinated townhouses and single-family houses that have been built throughout South Jersey by J.S. Hovnanian & Sons Inc. of Mount Laurel. Hovnanian, who lives in a condominium his company built, talks about its projects with words like care, craft and concern.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Carmela Carbo took an evening walk recently along the streets of Holiday Village, her quiet neighborhood of well-maintained yards, a swimming pool and tennis courts. During her stroll, the 70-year-old noticed something unusual - some of her neighbors were peering out from windows to see who was walking by. With what had happened there recently, Carbo said, she wasn't surprised. "We're looking out for each other," she said. Wariness has become commonplace in the senior citizens community after a string of burglaries last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
Penn Museum open house Visit the mummies and other artifacts from around the world, free during a 12-hour open house from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday. The special event celebrates the museum's 125th birthday. 3260 South St., www.penn.museum . Hanukkah bowling party Festive event 2-4 p.m. Sunday for children 10 and under. Please bring a new, unwrapped book or toy to donate. North Bowl, 909 N. 2nd St., $3.95 per person per game to bowl, plus a $4 shoe rental. For details, call 215-320-0376.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
It's hard to believe that Philadelphia officials - notably, Managing Director Richard Negrin - ever agreed to the silly decision to strip Christmas from atop the German-style Christmas market set up each year just outside City Hall. Fortunately, Mayor Nutter came to his senses late Wednesday and reversed the decision, saying he took time for "personal reflection. " Negrin said he'd received complaints from the public, so he ordered the name change on Monday. It was supposed to be changed to "Holiday Village," but the village operators later decided to take it down altogether.
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart and Stephen Jiwanmall, Inquirer Staff Writers
It began when word got to Managing Director Rich Negrin that some city workers and residents were offended by the giant "Christmas Village" sign erected on Dilworth Plaza's northwest corner. After all, there are a few Jewish and Muslim vendors among the nearly 50 wooden booths that make up Philadelphia's version of the traditional German Christmas village, which officially opened here Thursday. There was also a story that reached Negrin about a little Jewish girl walking with her father who asked, according to Negrin: "Dad, don't we get a village?"
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
And so, after four days of squabbling, the sign over City Hall's clutch of seasonal shops blinked on Thursday evening, uncensored. "Christmas Village" it read once again, with the provocative - and briefly erased - word Christmas restored in large, golden lights. Mayor Nutter's decision Wednesday to reverse other city officials, who had changed the name of the shops to Holiday Village, has not entirely calmed the waters. "People feel very strongly" about allowing religious names and images on public property, said Sarah Mullen, associate director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
IF SANTA HADN'T already been turned off by this city after getting pelted with snowballs at Franklin Field way back when, Mayor Nutter has guaranteed that he'll be avoiding this mediocre metropolis like the plague on a permanent basis. As everyone knows by now, until he suddenly changed his mind late yesterday, the mayor - via Managing Director Richard Negrin - issued a fatwa on the head of the chubby guy in the red suit by ordering that the dreaded word "Christmas" be removed from the arch that in recent years has stood over the Dilworth Plaza Christmas Village.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I'd like to thank Mayor Nutter for saving Christmas. On Wednesday afternoon he announced that the city had overreacted in changing the name of the traditional German Christmas Village on Dilworth Plaza to simply "Holiday Village. " "Christmas Village" it will be once again. And here I had been ready to bury the decision. Why not? Pulling the word Christmas off the sign over the village gate seemed ridiculous on Tuesday afternoon when I walked around that dollop of Deutschland outside City Hall, sampling the hot nuts and sizzling bratwursts, and ogling the tiny elves and fat Santas.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012
Penn Museum open house Visit the mummies and other artifacts from around the world, free during a 12-hour open house from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday. The special event celebrates the museum's 125th birthday. 3260 South St., www.penn.museum . Hanukkah bowling party Festive event 2-4 p.m. Sunday for children 10 and under. Please bring a new, unwrapped book or toy to donate. North Bowl, 909 N. 2nd St., $3.95 per person per game to bowl, plus a $4 shoe rental. For details, call 215-320-0376.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
And so, after four days of squabbling, the sign over City Hall's clutch of seasonal shops blinked on Thursday evening, uncensored. "Christmas Village" it read once again, with the provocative - and briefly erased - word Christmas restored in large, golden lights. Mayor Nutter's decision Wednesday to reverse other city officials, who had changed the name of the shops to Holiday Village, has not entirely calmed the waters. "People feel very strongly" about allowing religious names and images on public property, said Sarah Mullen, associate director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
IF SANTA HADN'T already been turned off by this city after getting pelted with snowballs at Franklin Field way back when, Mayor Nutter has guaranteed that he'll be avoiding this mediocre metropolis like the plague on a permanent basis. As everyone knows by now, until he suddenly changed his mind late yesterday, the mayor - via Managing Director Richard Negrin - issued a fatwa on the head of the chubby guy in the red suit by ordering that the dreaded word "Christmas" be removed from the arch that in recent years has stood over the Dilworth Plaza Christmas Village.
NEWS
December 2, 2010
It's hard to believe that Philadelphia officials - notably, Managing Director Richard Negrin - ever agreed to the silly decision to strip Christmas from atop the German-style Christmas market set up each year just outside City Hall. Fortunately, Mayor Nutter came to his senses late Wednesday and reversed the decision, saying he took time for "personal reflection. " Negrin said he'd received complaints from the public, so he ordered the name change on Monday. It was supposed to be changed to "Holiday Village," but the village operators later decided to take it down altogether.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I'd like to thank Mayor Nutter for saving Christmas. On Wednesday afternoon he announced that the city had overreacted in changing the name of the traditional German Christmas Village on Dilworth Plaza to simply "Holiday Village. " "Christmas Village" it will be once again. And here I had been ready to bury the decision. Why not? Pulling the word Christmas off the sign over the village gate seemed ridiculous on Tuesday afternoon when I walked around that dollop of Deutschland outside City Hall, sampling the hot nuts and sizzling bratwursts, and ogling the tiny elves and fat Santas.
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart and Stephen Jiwanmall, Inquirer Staff Writers
It began when word got to Managing Director Rich Negrin that some city workers and residents were offended by the giant "Christmas Village" sign erected on Dilworth Plaza's northwest corner. After all, there are a few Jewish and Muslim vendors among the nearly 50 wooden booths that make up Philadelphia's version of the traditional German Christmas village, which officially opened here Thursday. There was also a story that reached Negrin about a little Jewish girl walking with her father who asked, according to Negrin: "Dad, don't we get a village?"
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
It's that season again, which means that for the third year in a row, the German Christmas Village has set up a cozy collection of wooden booths and tree vendors in Dilworth Plaza on the west side of City Hall. But a few shoppers noticed something amiss yesterday on the tall metal archways signaling the entrances to the shops. The archways had just one word on top - "Village. " Sounds festive, eh? It turns out that the letters spelling "Christmas" were removed yesterday afternoon from the archways on the north and west sides of the plaza, at the request of Managing Director Richard Negrin.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A four-day search for a missing elderly man ended yesterday when members of his family discovered he was on holiday at his brother's home in Melbourne, Fla. Francis Carman, 81, disappeared from his home in the Holiday Village adult community after 6 a.m. Monday - the time he takes his daily walk around the Mount Laurel neighborhood. Police, emergency personnel and volunteers spent the week searching the Holiday Village area, which is near the intersection of Union Mill Road and Elbo Lane.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holiday Village, a community for people age 55 or older, will mark National Night Out with a celebration this Tuesday, where residents will be informed about how to avoid becoming crime victims. Several communities in South Jersey are sponsoring events by town watch groups. And Mount Laurel is hosting Burlington County's launch of National Night Out from noon to 4 p.m. today in a rally in Laurel Acres Park. At Holiday Village, although the community has never been overrun with crime, eight years ago, a few attempted burglaries spurred residents such as Len Moser to organize the group.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Carmela Carbo took an evening walk recently along the streets of Holiday Village, her quiet neighborhood of well-maintained yards, a swimming pool and tennis courts. During her stroll, the 70-year-old noticed something unusual - some of her neighbors were peering out from windows to see who was walking by. With what had happened there recently, Carbo said, she wasn't surprised. "We're looking out for each other," she said. Wariness has become commonplace in the senior citizens community after a string of burglaries last month.
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