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Holocaust

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NEWS
August 5, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services Compiled by staff writer Ron Goldwyn from Scripps Howard, Associated Press and Reuters
The United States' blind eye toward the Holocaust never became an election issue, even at the height of World War II. But reports of Serbian concentration camps, a chilling reminder of Nazi atrocities, puts American response to the ugly war in the former Yugoslavia squarely into the presidential campaign. Democratic nominee Bill Clinton, expressing outrage over reports of detention camp killings, yesterday called on the United States to seek an emergency session of the U.N. Security Council.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The Nazi persecution of the Jews entered a chapter of brutality 50 years ago this Wednesday with a night of terror that left 7,500 Jewish businesses and 177 synagogues demolished. Later known as Kristallnacht, or night of the broken glass, the violence touched virtually city and village in Germany. Rabbi emeritus Fred Susman of Beth Israel Synagogue at Fifth and Harmony Streets in Coatesville will speak about Kristallnacht and the Holocaust on Friday night at 8 p.m. during the regular Sabbath services.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Gary H. Sternberg, Special to The Inquirer
For Robert Kovacs and John Pesda, the Holocaust is a lesson that must continue to be taught, to ensure that it never happens again. For that reason, the two professors at Camden County College in Blackwood are establishing a program to educate teachers how to teach about the Holocaust. "In studying about these things, we can hopefully prevent them from happening again," said Pesda, a professor of history and the coordinator of the Holocaust program. "A people that fails to study its own history is doomed to repeat it. " The Holocaust refers to the Nazi extermination of an estimated 6 million Jews and 5 million others - including Catholics, homosexuals, Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses and intellectuals - during World War II in Europe.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
TO STU Bykofsky: Thanks for the wonderful and enlightening column about the Rev. Hermann Scheipers. As a history buff, I find that I must often remind people that the Holocaust encompassed many groups of people including - but not limited to - Jews. I also want to thank you for bringing to light the fact that the Soviet state was no better than the Third Reich. People often see the U.S.S.R. through rose-colored glasses - especially because of the World War II era, when we were allies.
NEWS
April 28, 1993
For those whose fathers fought the Nazis and for those who actually remember The War, learning of the Holocaust made the triumph even more profound, the sacrifice even more noble: The Liberators saved the world from monstrous evil. Which is why it's so distrubing that a recent poll shows that more than a third of Americans believe the Holocaust may not really have happened. Disturbing, but not surprising. Those times were marked by a completely different way of thinking, which, in today's world, is hard to reproduce, thank God. And so it must seem unreal to those who weren't around then.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
To Mend the World takes its title from a passage in the Book of Psalms and its inspiration from Emil Fackenheim's book on the art of the Holocaust - art created by concentration camp survivors. An emotionally charged documentary by Harry Rasky, who explored the artistic process in the Oscar-nominated Homage to Chagall (1977), the film alternates between panning shots of artworks and interviews with the artists and fellow survivors of Auschwitz, Treblinka and other Nazi death camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Train of Life, Jews stand by the railroad tracks, clutching suitcases and other possessions and waiting to board the cattle-cars while their vigilant German guards look on. It is an image that movies like Shoah, Sophie's Choice and Schindler's List have used to define the Holocaust and turn a simple means of transportation into something sinister and evil. But there's something wrong with this picture in Train of Life. The Jews are cheerful and clamber willingly into the cars, and they seem to be on oddly familiar and friendly terms with their guards.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | By THOMAS KENEALLY
The great irony is that people discover race hate the way lovers discover love. It always seems utterly new and fresh to the hater, who like the lover feels that he has invented the emotion. And like love, race hate always expresses itself in the same cliches uttered as if the hater had discovered the principles of the universe. "They take our jobs. " "They're everywhere. " "They're just too damn different. " Racism is as human as love. In defining ourselves, the tribe we belong to, its mores, we are tempted to believe in the inferiority of the culture and mores of other groups.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | New York Daily News
Jerome Brentar, dumped by Vice President George Bush from an ethnic campaign committee last week over allegations of anti-Semitism, insisted last night he was still part of the campaign and had not resigned. Brentar, a Croatian-American, also refused to concede that Nazis had deliberately gassed Jews during World War II and insisted on the innocence of John Demjanjuk, convicted in Israel this year of running the gas chamber at Treblinka death camp. In a confrontation with Rep. Stephen Solarz, D-N.Y.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, the painting is of a traditional Madonna and child, illuminated in gold, a celebration of two faces. But on second look, the facial features are pulled a bit off-balance, the eyes wary, slightly but perceptibly afraid. The subjects of this painting are not Mary and Jesus, but nameless Jewish ghetto children of the Holocaust. Mary Costanza, the artist, says she paints the children as religious figures - as icons. "The children in the ghettos helped each other.
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NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, when Sipora Groen travels, it's work. In between bar mitzvahs, graduations, and a Mother's Day reunion at the Jersey Shore, Groen has also been visiting local schools and congregations to tell her story of love and survival during the Holocaust. Sipora Rodrigues-Lopes was a young nurse in Amsterdam when the German occupation began. She was one of only 30,000 Dutch Jews - one in four - to survive the Nazis. The war took all her close relatives, her fiancee, her home, and her possessions, but also introduced her to the man who would become her husband.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Esther Terner Raab was among the 300 prisoners who on Oct. 14, 1943, escaped from Sobibor, the Nazi death camp in Poland. Mrs. Raab years later served as a consultant on the Belgrade set of Escape From Sobibor , the three-hour TV movie shown on the CBS network in 1987. A stage play about her, Dear Esther, was performed in 1998 at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and is performed regularly for student audiences in the Philadelphia region. She traveled often to testify at trials in Germany of concentration camp officials, a son, Abe, said.
NEWS
April 4, 2015
ISSUE | TAX HIKES Council incumbents, stand ground now I am appalled that City Council incumbents running for reelection are not acting on the city budget - especially its proposed 9.34 percent property tax increase - until after the May primary ("Council a no-go on tax boost," April 1). Haven't we given the schools an extra $200 million for the past several years? What are they doing with the money? If they cared about education, they would make use of the stored books and other equipment just going to waste.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a 20-year-old U.S. Army soldier in the all-black 183d Combat Engineers Battalion, Leon Bass arrived at the Nazis' Buchenwald extermination camp just one day after it had been liberated in April 1945. Bass saw the living skeletons of those who survived. The camp reeked of burned human flesh. The torture chambers were still covered in blood. After the war, Bass left the Army as a sergeant, returned to Philadelphia, and eventually became principal of Benjamin Franklin High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
True commemorations of the Holocaust are, by definition, borderline unbearable: Its atrocities loom larger in history as time goes on. Musically, Leonard Bernstein's Kaddish Symphony achieves much poetic truth, as narrated by Holocaust survivor Samuel Pisar. But Stephen Paulus' To Be Certain of the Dawn goes further with greater dramatic specificity, in ways that are simultaneously epic and intimate. It was performed over the weekend by massed choral forces and Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia under the sure direction of Jeffrey Brillhart.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willy Herbst, 93, of Philadelphia, a Holocaust survivor who later helped free prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp, died Tuesday, March 10, of complications from a hip fracture at the Hearth at Drexel in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Herbst was born in Zaberfeld, Germany, and trained as a baker in Heidelberg. In 1939, at 18, he was among the Jewish men sent to the Paderborn concentration camp by the Nazis to perform forced labor. According to an oral history Mr. Herbst gave the Jewish Virtual Library, he collapsed while being marched to a quarry in late 1939.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The top of a tattooed number 6 is still visible on his left forearm. David Wisnia had the rest of "83526" removed by a plastic surgeon. It was a reminder of three dark years spent in the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he witnessed unimaginable horrors. Wisnia, 88, of Levittown, remembers collecting bodies of fellow prisoners who had tried to escape and were gunned down. He recalls his Nazi captors' orders to retrieve money and valuables from the clothes shed by countless people before they were shot or gassed.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOHN McGOUGH was confused, and not a little bit angry. He was a loyal Irish Catholic; he had been in a seminary; he had been in the Army. Why hadn't he been hearing about the Holocaust? How come nobody he had known was talking about what he had come to see as the greatest human horror story of all time? Nazi Germany had methodically exterminated 6 million Jews in the greatest genocide of the 20th century. John set out to find out all he could about this horror story, and wound up devoted to spreading the word, through teaching, lecturing, writing.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fields, at first, appear unremarkable. These mass graves from the Holocaust weren't supposed to stick out. But the Rev. Patrick Desbois has devoted his life to finding them. Slowly, during visits to barren landscapes across Eastern Europe, the French priest will uncover artifacts hinting at the horrors that took place there decades ago: A shard of jewelry left tossed in a bush. A shell casing covered by overgrown grass. What Desbois finds most often, however, are stories from local villagers - witnesses who've remained and told him what they remember.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUDY Spitzer suffered through two great upheavals in her life, one caused by human venality and the other by nature. As a teenager, she was caught up in the Holocaust, but managed through guts and ingenuity to escape the Nazis, who murdered her father and other family members. Then, 70 years later, Hurricane Katrina drove her and her husband out of New Orleans, where they were teaching at a medical school. Finally settling in the relative peace of the Philadelphia area, Judy could look back on a life of accomplishment realized in the toils of catastrophes that might have wrecked less fearless souls.
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