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Holocaust

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NEWS
August 5, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services Compiled by staff writer Ron Goldwyn from Scripps Howard, Associated Press and Reuters
The United States' blind eye toward the Holocaust never became an election issue, even at the height of World War II. But reports of Serbian concentration camps, a chilling reminder of Nazi atrocities, puts American response to the ugly war in the former Yugoslavia squarely into the presidential campaign. Democratic nominee Bill Clinton, expressing outrage over reports of detention camp killings, yesterday called on the United States to seek an emergency session of the U.N. Security Council.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The Nazi persecution of the Jews entered a chapter of brutality 50 years ago this Wednesday with a night of terror that left 7,500 Jewish businesses and 177 synagogues demolished. Later known as Kristallnacht, or night of the broken glass, the violence touched virtually city and village in Germany. Rabbi emeritus Fred Susman of Beth Israel Synagogue at Fifth and Harmony Streets in Coatesville will speak about Kristallnacht and the Holocaust on Friday night at 8 p.m. during the regular Sabbath services.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Gary H. Sternberg, Special to The Inquirer
For Robert Kovacs and John Pesda, the Holocaust is a lesson that must continue to be taught, to ensure that it never happens again. For that reason, the two professors at Camden County College in Blackwood are establishing a program to educate teachers how to teach about the Holocaust. "In studying about these things, we can hopefully prevent them from happening again," said Pesda, a professor of history and the coordinator of the Holocaust program. "A people that fails to study its own history is doomed to repeat it. " The Holocaust refers to the Nazi extermination of an estimated 6 million Jews and 5 million others - including Catholics, homosexuals, Gypsies, Jehovah's Witnesses and intellectuals - during World War II in Europe.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
TO STU Bykofsky: Thanks for the wonderful and enlightening column about the Rev. Hermann Scheipers. As a history buff, I find that I must often remind people that the Holocaust encompassed many groups of people including - but not limited to - Jews. I also want to thank you for bringing to light the fact that the Soviet state was no better than the Third Reich. People often see the U.S.S.R. through rose-colored glasses - especially because of the World War II era, when we were allies.
NEWS
April 28, 1993
For those whose fathers fought the Nazis and for those who actually remember The War, learning of the Holocaust made the triumph even more profound, the sacrifice even more noble: The Liberators saved the world from monstrous evil. Which is why it's so distrubing that a recent poll shows that more than a third of Americans believe the Holocaust may not really have happened. Disturbing, but not surprising. Those times were marked by a completely different way of thinking, which, in today's world, is hard to reproduce, thank God. And so it must seem unreal to those who weren't around then.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
To Mend the World takes its title from a passage in the Book of Psalms and its inspiration from Emil Fackenheim's book on the art of the Holocaust - art created by concentration camp survivors. An emotionally charged documentary by Harry Rasky, who explored the artistic process in the Oscar-nominated Homage to Chagall (1977), the film alternates between panning shots of artworks and interviews with the artists and fellow survivors of Auschwitz, Treblinka and other Nazi death camps.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Train of Life, Jews stand by the railroad tracks, clutching suitcases and other possessions and waiting to board the cattle-cars while their vigilant German guards look on. It is an image that movies like Shoah, Sophie's Choice and Schindler's List have used to define the Holocaust and turn a simple means of transportation into something sinister and evil. But there's something wrong with this picture in Train of Life. The Jews are cheerful and clamber willingly into the cars, and they seem to be on oddly familiar and friendly terms with their guards.
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | By THOMAS KENEALLY
The great irony is that people discover race hate the way lovers discover love. It always seems utterly new and fresh to the hater, who like the lover feels that he has invented the emotion. And like love, race hate always expresses itself in the same cliches uttered as if the hater had discovered the principles of the universe. "They take our jobs. " "They're everywhere. " "They're just too damn different. " Racism is as human as love. In defining ourselves, the tribe we belong to, its mores, we are tempted to believe in the inferiority of the culture and mores of other groups.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | New York Daily News
Jerome Brentar, dumped by Vice President George Bush from an ethnic campaign committee last week over allegations of anti-Semitism, insisted last night he was still part of the campaign and had not resigned. Brentar, a Croatian-American, also refused to concede that Nazis had deliberately gassed Jews during World War II and insisted on the innocence of John Demjanjuk, convicted in Israel this year of running the gas chamber at Treblinka death camp. In a confrontation with Rep. Stephen Solarz, D-N.Y.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, the painting is of a traditional Madonna and child, illuminated in gold, a celebration of two faces. But on second look, the facial features are pulled a bit off-balance, the eyes wary, slightly but perceptibly afraid. The subjects of this painting are not Mary and Jesus, but nameless Jewish ghetto children of the Holocaust. Mary Costanza, the artist, says she paints the children as religious figures - as icons. "The children in the ghettos helped each other.
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NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By David Lee Preston
By David Lee Preston I'll be following the Republican National Convention this week in Cleveland with particular interest, partly because I am a child of Holocaust survivors, and partly because of my relationships with two men who are no longer among us. One is Elie Wiesel, the Nobel laureate who died July 2, who famously beseeched President Ronald Reagan not to visit the graves of Nazi SS soldiers at Bitburg, Germany. "That place, Mr. President, is not your place," the survivor told the Republican icon, speaking truth to power when he accepted the Congressional Gold Medal in April 1985.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Paul B. Winkler, 79, of Lawrenceville, N.J., the groundbreaking executive director of the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education from 1975 to May of this year, died of cancer on Tuesday, July 12, at his home. In March 1994, the New Jersey Senate adopted "an act regarding genocide education in the public schools. " It stated that "every board of education shall include instruction on the Holocaust and genocide in an appropriate place in the curriculum of all elementary and secondary school pupils.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
ISSUE | HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL Remember all victims Philadelphia's Holocaust Memorial should incorporate the five million non-Jews who were killed by Adolf Hitler's forces (" 'A uniquely Jewish experience,' " Monday). I take issue with the letter writer who implied that to do so would deny the Nazis' obsession with the Jews. These Polish Christians and other non-Jews were not some sort of collateral damage but were Nazi targets, too. As a Jewish American born in Amsterdam, I identified deeply with Anne Frank and took to heart that she cried watching Romani and Hungarian children being led to the crematoria.
NEWS
May 24, 2016
ISSUE | HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL 'A uniquely Jewish experience' A letter took issue with the plan for the Philadelphia Holocaust Memorial being solely about Jews ("Remember five million others, too," Tuesday). Writer Elie Wiesel said it best: "While not all victims were Jews, all Jews were victims. " Like it or not, the Holocaust was a uniquely Jewish experience. I don't write this with pride, but rather with extreme sadness and bitterness. The Polish Christians and others who were killed by Adolf Hitler's forces were not written about in Mein Kampf as a subhuman race that had to be destroyed.
NEWS
May 18, 2016
ISSUE | HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL A reminder to stop all genocide As a Jewish American, I was heartened to learn of the plans for a Holocaust Memorial Park, including the 1964 sculpture at 16th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway ("Never, ever forgotten," Thursday). To me, the three famous questions of the renowned Jewish thinker Hillel are germane: 1. If I am not for myself, who will be for me? The proposed memorial, and many similar efforts nationwide, should serve as a living reminder that never again should Jews be threatened or killed, or allow ourselves to be. 2. But if I am only for myself, who am I?
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
When it was installed in 1964, Philadelphia's Holocaust Memorial - a statue depicting figures consumed in fire - was the first of its kind in North America. On Tuesday, city officials and a group of Holocaust survivors announced plans for the statue at 16th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to serve as the entrance to a memorial park - one that aims to educate future visitors as the events of the Holocaust recede further into the past. On hand at the memorial Tuesday were members of the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation, which spearheaded the plan, as well as local Holocaust survivors, some of whom worked to erect the original statue, by Polish artist Nathan Rapoport, more than 50 years ago. Max Shieman of North Philadelphia was among them.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Holocaust survivor David Tuck will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Yom HaShoah Observance at York's Jewish Community Center. At age 9, Tuck spent was taken to the Lodz ghetto in Poland in 1940. He spent the next five years circulating from a labor camp in Posen in Poland to Auschwitz in Germany. He eventually landed in Güsen II, an underground factory to build German aircraft for the war. He weighed only 78 pounds at th end of the war, Tuck was liberated from Güsen II on May 5, 1945.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
As a child growing up outside Warsaw, David Wisnia was a prodigy. He sang in opera houses and spent time with prominent cantors who tutored him in chanting prayers for synagogue. Years later, as a teenager imprisoned at the Auschwitz concentration camp, that talent became his lifeline. "What kept my grandfather going, and what saved his life, was his voice," said Wisnia's grandson, Avi, speaking on Sunday at the National Museum of American Jewish History to an audience that included his grandfather.
NEWS
March 17, 2016
ISSUE | JEWISH IDENTITY Holocaust lives in today's anti-Semitism I share columnist Charles Krauthammer's concern that too many American Jews view Holocaust memory as the substance of their Jewishness and agree that we need to base Jewish identity on positive Jewish content ("Identity and the Holocaust," Monday). While the Holocaust happened in the past, the anti-Semitism that caused it is growing, so the lessons of the 1930s and '40s remain relevant. That is why the American Jewish Committee, the global Jewish advocacy agency, has organized the largest protest against anti-Semitism in history, encouraging mayors in American and European cities to sign a statement denouncing anti-Semitism as incompatible with democratic values and committing to advance respectful coexistence in their own communities.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
ISSUE | GENOCIDE More than Holocaust In the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site, there is a message commissioned by survivors: "Never Again. " Sadly, their message goes unheeded as one genocide follows another. Columnist Charles Krauthammer worries that Jews will reduce their heritage to one catastrophic event, the Holocaust ("Identity and the Holocaust," Monday). As a friend of survivor Eva Kor who will accompany her for the third time to Auschwitz-Birkenau Extermination Camp, I am dedicated to keeping the memory alive, to silencing deniers, and to teaching others so that one day, genocides really will never happen again.
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