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Holocaust Survivors

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NEWS
June 12, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
German insurance companies that had never paid on Jewish claims during the Holocaust will allocate $59,400 this year for survivors in the Philadelphia area and $2.4 million nationwide. The first of 10 annual payments was announced last week as part of a $132 million global settlement between the companies and the International Commission on Holocaust-Era Insurance Claims. The money is being given to agencies that provide "essential social services to Jewish victims of Nazism," particularly home care, the commission said.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | By Andrew Hussie, Special to The Inquirer
Edith Millman was 15 when she was placed in the Warsaw ghetto by the Nazis in 1941. She survived in that man-made hell for almost two years, and lost 48 members of her family in the Holocaust. After World War II ended, she emigrated to the United States and now lives in Upper Dublin Township. Hanna Silver survived the Holocaust as a young woman in Berlin, working for a company that produced sheet metal. She survived using forged papers and a fake, Aryan identity. She waited, for the duration of the war, with a kind of dread impossible to imagine as so many other Jews disappeared.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Fifty years ago, Nazi leaders gathered in a fashionable Berlin suburb to plot the eradication of European Jews. Yesterday, Philadelphia-area survivors of the Holocaust told a House subcommittee of their experiences during that terrible time. Rep. Peter Kostmayer, D-Pa., said he held the hearing because there are several generations that have not been touched by the Holocaust and he thinks people need to be reminded. Edith Millman, of Willow Grove, Montgomery County, was 15 when the Nazis began bombing Warsaw, Poland.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
These are the words of Isabella Leitner, recalling the moment she was brought out from Nazi bondage 45 years ago: "We are liberated! Barefoot, wearing only a single garment each, we all surge out into the brutal January frost and snow of Eastern Germany and run toward the troops. "Shrieks of joy. Shrieks of pain. Shrieks of deliverance. All the pent-up hysteria accumulated over years of pain and terror suddenly released. "I have never since heard sounds like those we uttered, sounds released from the very depths of our being.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abram Shnaper, 70, a Holocaust survivor, is not happy today. Rachmil Zygumtowicz, 68, also a Holocaust survivor, is worried. And survivor Mina Kalter, 65, is concerned. "My heart gave me a jump. I had palpitations," Kalter said, describing her reaction to watching television last week as East Germany opened its borders. While most of the world has greeted the opening of the Berlin Wall as a positive turning point in East-West relations, many Holocaust survivors have an uneasy feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Amir Bar-Lev's Fighter could have been called The Fighter and the Writer. A brilliant and engaging documentary about two friends and Holocaust survivors - men in their 70s who share similar backgrounds and are brought together by the filmmaker to retrace their journeys and reclaim their memories. The film speaks to fundamental issues of history, truth, and the philosophical conflicts of humankind. Jan Wiener, a feisty, mustachioed, white-haired figure, and Arnost Lustig, a sardonic, bespectacled fellow, are both Czech emigres living in America.
NEWS
December 21, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a little boy in Czechoslovakia, Emil Paul got pennies - gelt - for Hanukkah. Growing up in Romania, Lili Goldener got gifts of sleds and scarves and coats each day of the holiday. And for her "crime" of being Jewish, the Nazis sent Goldener to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. They sent Paul to the Mauthausen labor camp in Austria. Their parents and 10 of their 18 siblings perished in Nazi camps. But Emil and Lili survived, and with them their faith traditions endure.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karessa Meitzke Foldvary, 90, formerly of Broomall, a retired nurse who cared for concentration camp survivors at the end of World War II, died Wednesday at Lima Estates, a retirement community in Media, of complications from a hip fracture. A native of Amherst, Ohio, Mrs. Foldvary graduated from the Elyria Memorial Hospital School of Nursing in Ohio. In 1942, she enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps and shipped overseas in November 1944. After several weeks treating soldiers on the front line in France, she helped set up field hospitals in Germany with as many as 1,100 cots, her daughter Sharon Molino said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Itka Zygmuntowicz remembers everything. Every agonizing detail. Years, decades were stripped away when she read from her own book of poetry recently at a Holocaust survivors reunion at the National Museum of American Jewish History: A number is tattooed for life on my arm On my mind, my heart, my soul. I remember the killing center of Auschwitz And the six million voices that call. Do not forget us!     Zygmuntowicz, 85, a native of Poland, was one of about three dozen elderly men and women who had once been interviewed as part of Steven Spielberg's Survivors of the Shoah project, conducted from 1994 to 1999.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holocaust survivors and the children of survivors will speak at several area synagogues, churches and universities in observance of Holocaust Remembrance Week, which begins Friday and continues through April 30. April 27 is Yom Hashoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day. It marks the 50th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps and the end of World War II. IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY Suzanne Gross will share her experiences as...
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NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Ellen Meinberg Tarlow, 88, formerly of Glenside, a Holocaust survivor who narrowly escaped Germany for America and later told of her family's ordeal at the hands of the Nazis, died Sunday, Aug. 21, of heart failure at the Quadrangle in Haverford. Mrs. Tarlow lived through Kristallnacht - Nov. 9 and 10, 1938 - when, as part of the anti-Semitic rage that gripped the country, storm troopers broke into her family's home in Gütersloh and smashed everything. Just 10 years old, she turned on her bedside lamp to see a soldier above her, armed with a shiny ax and a pistol.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By David Lee Preston
By David Lee Preston I'll be following the Republican National Convention this week in Cleveland with particular interest, partly because I am a child of Holocaust survivors, and partly because of my relationships with two men who are no longer among us. One is Elie Wiesel, the Nobel laureate who died July 2, who famously beseeched President Ronald Reagan not to visit the graves of Nazi SS soldiers at Bitburg, Germany. "That place, Mr. President, is not your place," the survivor told the Republican icon, speaking truth to power when he accepted the Congressional Gold Medal in April 1985.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie's campaign last year to overhaul pension and health benefits for New Jersey's public employees hasn't come to fruition. But the governor took action last week that could serve as a bargaining chip in his call to cut costs: He tied millions of dollars for municipalities and nonprofits in the state budget to negotiations over worker health benefits. Christie issued an executive order placing nearly $100 million into reserve from the $34.5 billion fiscal year budget he signed into law last week.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
When it was installed in 1964, Philadelphia's Holocaust Memorial - a statue depicting figures consumed in fire - was the first of its kind in North America. On Tuesday, city officials and a group of Holocaust survivors announced plans for the statue at 16th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to serve as the entrance to a memorial park - one that aims to educate future visitors as the events of the Holocaust recede further into the past. On hand at the memorial Tuesday were members of the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation, which spearheaded the plan, as well as local Holocaust survivors, some of whom worked to erect the original statue, by Polish artist Nathan Rapoport, more than 50 years ago. Max Shieman of North Philadelphia was among them.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Holocaust survivor David Tuck will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Yom HaShoah Observance at York's Jewish Community Center. At age 9, Tuck spent was taken to the Lodz ghetto in Poland in 1940. He spent the next five years circulating from a labor camp in Posen in Poland to Auschwitz in Germany. He eventually landed in Güsen II, an underground factory to build German aircraft for the war. He weighed only 78 pounds at th end of the war, Tuck was liberated from Güsen II on May 5, 1945.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
As a child growing up outside Warsaw, David Wisnia was a prodigy. He sang in opera houses and spent time with prominent cantors who tutored him in chanting prayers for synagogue. Years later, as a teenager imprisoned at the Auschwitz concentration camp, that talent became his lifeline. "What kept my grandfather going, and what saved his life, was his voice," said Wisnia's grandson, Avi, speaking on Sunday at the National Museum of American Jewish History to an audience that included his grandfather.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Rieder, 88, a Holocaust survivor who later educated young people about the atrocity, died Aug. 8 in Lions Gate retirement community in Voorhees of coronary artery disease. Mrs. Rieder had a "fierce determination to live" until the very end of her life, her family said. Her unyielding spirit saw her through internment camps during World War II, after her family's region of Czechoslovakia fell under anti-Jewish rule. In 1944, when she was 16, she and seven of her eight siblings were shuttled from a ghetto in Tachova, a town in what is now the Czech Republic, to Auschwitz.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
These days, when Sipora Groen travels, it's work. In between bar mitzvahs, graduations, and a Mother's Day reunion at the Jersey Shore, Groen has also been visiting local schools and congregations to tell her story of love and survival during the Holocaust. Sipora Rodrigues-Lopes was a young nurse in Amsterdam when the German occupation began. She was one of only 30,000 Dutch Jews - one in four - to survive the Nazis. The war took all her close relatives, her fiancee, her home, and her possessions, but also introduced her to the man who would become her husband.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Many events will mark this year's 70th anniversary of the end of World War II. One of the most poignant occurred last month, when Holocaust survivors returned to Poland to commemorate their release from the Auschwitz concentration camp. The horrors they suffered are recounted in a new HBO documentary, Night Will Fall , which, like Selma, the theatrical film depicting a seminal moment in the civil rights movement, should be seen by a much wider audience. Night Will Fall includes footage of Holocaust victims being freed and details the depravities of their Nazi captors.
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