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Holocaust

NEWS
April 23, 1987 | By Philip Walzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solemnly, they lined up next to a small table clothed in white. On it were a metal vase with a dozen roses and a candelabrum with six branches, each representing one million of the Jews slaughtered by the Nazis during World War II. As their names were announced, each of six people lighted a white candle - first, five survivors, one sobbing softly, and then a teenager. His candle was for the "iber milyon kinder" - the more than a million children who were killed. The austere candlelighting began a Holocaust memorial ceremony in words and music Sunday at the Workmen's Circle, a Jewish organization sponsoring cultural events at 6515 Bustleton Ave. Although Yom Hashoah (Day of Annihilation)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In one of the most chilling scenes in the landmark Holocaust documentary Shoah, Claude Lanzmann interviewed a group of now-aging Polish farmers who had plowed their fields up to the barbed wire of the concentration camp at Treblinka. The intervening years had done nothing to diminish their almost jovial anti-Semitism. Lanzmann's incomparable and monumental film went beyond the victims and their Nazi persecutors to ask some very pertinent questions of the bystanders. Namely, what - if anything - did you do while your neighbors were being loaded onto the trains?
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | By Kristin Vaughan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Steven Spielberg accepted an Oscar for his 1993 Holocaust docudrama Schindler's List, it gave author Shalom Yoran the inspiration to make good on a half-century-old promise. He remembers hearing the director say that with only 300,000 Holocaust survivors left in the world, if you don't tell their story, nobody will. Those words were echoing in his mind along with his mother's last words before his parents were burned to death along with 1,038 other Jews by Nazis in a small town in Poland.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A national touring exhibit of photographs of some unsung heroes of World War II opens Saturday at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. "Rescuers of the Holocaust" is a collection of photographs of the European people who risked their lives to hide Jews from Hitler's Final Solution - torture and death in concentration camps. Photographer Gay Block and author Malka Drucker traveled Europe and the United States from 1986 to 1989 to interview and photograph these rescuers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Holocaust humor? It sounds like a daunting prospect for an evening at the theater. Certainly, there aren't many belly laughs to be had from the idea of a death camp. But reality is always more complex than we suspect. In his first night at Auschwitz, Sol Filler later told his daughter, his entire barracks - so crowded that the prisoners even had to turn in unison - burst into laughter at the preposterousness of their plight. The ability to laugh never left him - and he credited it with helping him survive.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Theatricality takes many forms, and the most satisfying of these is a felicitous coalescence of writing, design and performance. The Temple University Theater production of Shem Bitterman's "The Ramp," currently at Stage III of the Center City Campus, meets these criteria consummately. Bitterman's three-character play, seen here in its East Coast premiere, belongs in the general category of Holocaust theater. But in its oblique approach to the subject, it establishes a more intellectualized, if no less damning, commentary on the Hitlerian massacre of European Jewry, rather than a plunge into the flames and the burning flesh.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | By Nancy M. Barnes, Special to The Inquirer
A bronze sculpture depicting the significance of the Holocaust for Jews and gentiles will go on permanent display tomorrow in the Sculpture Garden of the James A. Michener Arts Center in Doylestown. Erwinna residents Mark and Helene Hankin will present the sculpture "I Set Before You This Day" by Solebury artist George Anthonisen to the center at a ceremony that begins at 5:30 p.m. Kenneth Libo, curator at the Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York, and Thomas W. Simons Jr., a career diplomat, will speak at the event.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marga Forester, 90, of Wynnewood, a Holocaust survivor who escaped from Nazi Germany to England on the famous Kindertransport, died Sunday, Feb. 9, of a heart attack at home. Mrs. Forester, the former Marga Levy, was married to fellow Holocaust survivor Frank Forester, who died of respiratory failure Dec. 3, also at home in Wynnewood. He was 88. They were together 69 years. As children - she was 16, he was 13 - the two left Germany on separate Kindertransports, the rescue effort in which Britain agreed to take in 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland when the Nazis were gaining power.
NEWS
September 16, 2012
Eli Zborowski, a survivor of the Holocaust who made it his mission to ensure that it would never be forgotten, founded an American organization to support Israel's official Holocaust memorial and raised more than $100 million for it, died Monday of cardiac arrest in Queens. He was 86. Mr. Zborowski started the American and International Societies for Yad Vashem, the Israeli memorial, in 1953, a year after he arrived in the United States as a penniless Jewish immigrant from Poland with little knowledge of English.
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