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Holocaust

NEWS
March 11, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Roland Millman and Beverly Post will discuss their film, Double Heritage, at a 9:30 a.m. breakfast meeting Sunday at Temple Israel of Upper Darby, 501 Bywood Ave. The film is about child survivors of the Holocaust who were adopted by nonrelatives. Millman is the child of two such children. A short version of the film will be shown. The cost for the breakfast is $5. LENTEN PROGRAMS A four-day Lenten retreat, conducted by Catherine Joanne, will take place beginning at 7 p.m. Sunday through March 19 at Sacred Heart Church, 120 Jefferson St., Swedesburg.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 2 months old, what could she know? What could she know of being Jewish or of Nazi hate? Or of her mother's torment when she gave her up in order to save her? Her father already had been killed, and days later, her mother was rounded up, packed into a cattle car and shipped to the death camp at Auschwitz. The childless Catholic couple who took Miriam Rakowski into their Brussels home in 1943 gave her love, safety, comfort. Snapshots show a smiling, chubby little girl. She remembers it that way, too: Five dogs in the house, two cats.
NEWS
May 25, 2009 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Franklin H. Littell, 91, of Merion Station, a Methodist minister widely acknowledged as the father of modern Holocaust studies in America, died Saturday at home after a long illness. Mr. Littell dedicated his life to Holocaust research after spending nearly 10 years in postwar Germany as chief Protestant religious adviser in the U.S. high command. He was the first American scholar to offer courses on Holocaust and genocide studies, and at Temple University he established the nation's first doctoral program on Holocaust studies in 1976.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
In penning a song about the Holocaust, Eliza Azzarano, Alexandra Silvestri, Alna Hofmeyr, and Julianne Puckette couldn't draw from experience. But the eighth graders at Radnor Middle School found a connection in a Jewish girl who - though generations removed - wasn't far from their age: Anne Frank. "We kind of were inspired by how she was locked up for so long," Azzarano said, "and how she wanted to be free. " With Radnor eighth grader Ben Webster, the girls wrote "The Last Butterfly," a song with music composed by Hofmeyr that imagines the experience of the last Holocaust survivor.
NEWS
April 29, 2005 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Holocaust survivor Charles Wolf, 81, who settled in Northeast Philadelphia and worked as a cabinetmaker, died of colon cancer Tuesday at Nazareth Hospital. Mr. Wolf was one of eight children born to Dov and Rivkah Wolfowitz in Czestochowa, Poland. Mr. Wolf and his brother Morris were the only two in their family to survive the Holocaust. The brothers were working as slave laborers in a munitions factory near Czestochowa when they were rounded up and transported to the Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
The editor of the Temple University newspaper said yesterday the Temple News has revised its advertising policy in hopes of avoiding the publication of controversial ads like the one earlier this month that was criticized by the Anti-Defamation League. The ad, which ran in the weekly paper on Nov. 9, denied that the Holocaust ever took place, and promoted a Web site that questions the occurrence of the Holocaust. The organization that paid for the ad was the Committee for Open Debate on the Holocaust, and the ad has run in several college papers in recent years, according to Temple News editor Jill Waldbieser.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | BY JOHN C. RAINES
Some people get upset because Jews keep remembering the Holocaust. The real problem is that we Christians keep forgetting. Some people deplore the disappointment shown by Jews when Pope John Paul II recently welcomed Kurt Waldheim, the president of Austria, to the Vatican City in Rome. But too often we forget that Waldheim has been excluded by the Justice Department from entering our own country because of his involvement as a Nazi officer in the genocide of Jews in Yugoslavia.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Deann Comer teaches her students about the slaughter of millions during the Holocaust, the children ask questions that remain troubling more than 40 years after the end of World War II. Why were children killed? Why didn't somebody help? Why are some people evil? "It is a very scary subject to teach," said Comer, a fourth-grade teacher at Glenside-Weldon Elementary School in Abington. "It's difficult to expose children to the full horror of what took place. " Comer and a committee of four other Glenside-Weldon teachers tackled the difficult task three years ago of formulating lesson plans to teach fourth, fifth and sixth graders about the state-sponsored slaughter of six million Jews and millions of other victims of Nazism during World War II. The program that began as part of Glenside-Weldon's model school project will now become part of the Abington school district curriculum.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By William F. Buckley Jr
The Pope has addressed the president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, citing the Holocaust as the grimmest recent experience of national godlessness. He has done so in a letter of striking impact, marred only by the timing. When the Pope consented to an interview with Kurt Waldheim a few weeks ago, his doing so was offensive not only to Jews but to others who have developed a contempt for Waldheim based in part on his having concealed what he did during the war years, and in part on what it is alleged he actually did during the war years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In what looks like a macabre pastiche of Hamlet contemplating Yorick's skull, a middle-aged man stands at the bottom of a grave and reverently holds the bones that have lain there for half a century. They are the remains of his father, one of the millions who perished in the Holocaust, and the unique quest that brings Henryk Grynberg to the unquiet grave is the substance of Birthplace. Pavel Lozinski's film is a devastating and deceptively simple documentary devoted to one death among the many.
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