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FOOD
July 7, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop in for a sack of basmati rice, garam masala, or perhaps the British chocolates the owners have set under glass - in case a light-fingered Anglophile with a sweet tooth shows up. As you wander the aisles of this West Philadelphia grocery store, wondering what is what and how you would cook it, the sound of foreign voices, singing, catches your ear. Curious, you move to the back of the store and find a fluorescent-lit room with a predominantly...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The sign on 49th Street near Woodland Avenue made me stop the car and turn around. "Hot and delicious soul food. Hazel's secret recipes," it said. It was lunchtime, and the ladies of Evangel Temple Church had just finished setting up tables weighed down with Hazel's chicken (fried, baked or barbecued), ribs, meatloaf, greens, potato salad, macaroni and cheese and spaghetti with meat sauce. Hazel was inside, overseeing the candied yams still in the oven. On Sundays, she and her husband, Rev. Alfonzer Patrick, oversee the church's flock.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Giacomo's Ristorante in downtown Norristown is a charming outpost of culinary civility. Although it looks much like a country French cafe, Giacomo's is an Italian restaurant with good home cooking and moderate prices. The attractive mix-and-match decor blends several styles. Pretty flowered blue wallpaper and light-blue ruffled cafe curtains with balloon valances at windows fronting East Main Street suggest French influences. Polished-wood wainscoting and brass lantern sconces attest to the building's long history.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fast proliferating, Italian restaurants are all the rage these days; indeed, dozens of new places have been opening the past year or so in seemingly endless splendor. But few can match the quality of the home cooking at the new Riviera Ristorante & Pizza in Sharp's Run Plaza outside Medford. Riviera shares space with a pizza operation on one side, but make no mistake: The restaurant side has memorable cuisine at low prices you'll long remember. Small enough for intimate dining (it seats only 36)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
"I want them to eat and be happy," is the way Alfonso Luberto explained it. Each word carried its own particular emphasis. "I want them to be comfortable. I want the restaurant to be a combination between food and aesthetics. " And then he added: "I want to give this restaurant a soul. " Spoken like a true Neapolitan. Even without music in the background, a telephone dialogue with Luberto conveyed the deep passion of a young man from Naples. Luberto, who has been in this country for about 15 years, was speaking about his new restaurant - Luberto's - which opened in April in a small shopping strip across from the Grant Plaza at Welsh Road and Grant Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If casual defines your comfort standards and family-style dining appeals to you, better not miss Cassano Italian Cafe and Bar. This Cherry Hill restaurant sets the standard. Cassano's has been open for about 2 1/2 years, but it wasn't until late last year that it developed its family theme. "I actually had the idea a few years back, but kept it on the back burner," says John A. Cassano Jr., chef-owner. "We were an upscale supper club. People really had to dress. You couldn't just walk in and sit down and eat. " 'This isn't the way to do business,' I thought.
NEWS
May 25, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three, not two, things in life are certain: death, taxes and the assurance that you will never go hungry in the Capri Room, Pennsauken's newest restaurant. The restaurant opened three months ago as part of the House of Pizza, but don't let the name fool you; the dining room is separate from the pizza operation. The Capri Room resembles the many family-run South Philadelphia restaurants that specialize in good home cooking - and lots of it. The tradition has now crossed the Delaware; the result is that the Capri Room is already so popular that reservations are virtually mandatory.
FOOD
September 22, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
When Juanita Welch was learning the intricacies and flavors of Mexican food from her mother while growing up in Torreon, Mexico, she never thought her love of cooking would become a thriving home-based business. But necessity proved to be the impetus for the birth of JSS Enterprises, when her husband, Bob, lost his job in November as an engineer at a West Chester company. "I wanted to do something to help out with our family's finances," she said, sitting in the spotless kitchen of the Welches' West Bradford home in Chester County.
FOOD
January 8, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The watchword for 2009 is less , as in: getting by on less; using less expensive ingredients; eating out less often. And more home cooking. The trend will affect families at all points along the culinary spectrum. Bon Appetit magazine, for example, suggests its home cooks substitute truffle oil for more expensive truffles, while Wegmans supermarkets say sales of supplies for home baking and canning are way up. "Over the last year, we've seen increased sales of baking ingredients such as flour, even over the spring and summer when flour prices were rising dramatically," says Josephine Natale, spokeswoman for the supermarket chain.
FOOD
May 24, 2000 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Charlotte Pennisi makes the best roast-pork sandwiches this - and that - side of the Walt Whitman. The finest fried meatballs, too. At least that's what her husband, Joe, says. He should know. He's been eating them now for more than 25 years. But Joe Pennisi isn't one to keep a good thing to himself. For years, he's been urging his wife to go into business and share her home cooking with the masses. "He always wanted me to open a sandwich shop," said Pennisi, a mother of three boys.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I love using the geographic imagery of the North and South Poles to help my young cooks remember how to slice an onion. It's just one of many bits of wisdom I've picked up from the volunteers teaching the same recipes in other schools, and truly an unexpected bonus. As a self-taught home cook, with nary a cooking class to my name, I'm so grateful for the tips to share with my fifth graders at Bayard Taylor Elementary in North Philadelphia, where we are in our sixth week of cooking together.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
WHEN PATRONS walk into Wazobia, a West African restaurant specializing in the comfort foods of Nigeria, many greet the owner in the Yoruba language. "This is my countryman," owner Risikat Bola Jamiu, who usually goes by Bola, says of a man from the Ibo tribe. Jamiu is Yoruba but welcomes all three of Nigeria's major ethnic groups. Even her North Philadelphia restaurant's name is a combination of the words for "come in" from the three languages: wa in Yoruba, zo in Hausa, bia in Ibo. "We are all blended together as one Nigeria," Jamiu said Friday.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
U.S. OPEN FEVER has hit Main Line homeowners like the rockin' pneumonia and the boogie-woogie flu, fueled by fantasies of making five-figure fortunes by renting their houses near the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore for the June 10-16 tournament. One online ad for a four-bedroom, five-bath colonial boasting a 650-bottle wine cellar suggested, "Chat with Tiger Woods and the rest of the U.S. Open golfers as they walk the 8th hole directly behind this home. " Another ad touted "formal and informal dining rooms" and "three living rooms with two grand fireplaces.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Sally Downey, For The Inquirer
Some years ago, when, my daughter, Regina, was living on her own in Manhattan, she received a notice from the gas company. The utility offered to shut off service to her stove because the appliance hadn't been used since she moved into her apartment the year before. Regina was amused by the offer. I was not. My daughter, who was raised on nutritious home cooking, couldn't bother to switch on a burner or heat up an oven to make a meal. Instead she dined on takeout or cereal. It was little comfort to me that other young singles she knew received the same notice.
SPORTS
March 1, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the Flyers should stay in a hotel the night before home games - as they have done on occasion in past years - and it will help them play with the same focus they have on the road. It will also keep them away from the real reason they have struggled at the Wells Fargo Center this season: Too many orders from their wives and girlfriends. At least that's a theory espoused by Jaromir Jagr, the legendary Flyers right winger who will be in the Hall of Fame someday.
FOOD
February 16, 2012
Craig: After all my recent restaurant eating, it was a joy to do some home cooking. This weekend I tackled David Chang's phenomenal bo ssam roasted pork butt from the Momofuku cookbook, with all the fixings, plus some homemade steamed buns. The pork was amazing, like salty-sugar glazed pork candy. But I was really proud of these buns: Just look at these steamy little guys! Chinatown at home! Reader: What would it take for a three-bell restaurant like Le Virtu to get four bells?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2012
Bio : 35; from Ocean City, N.J.; lives in Philadelphia with his wife. Philly/Jersey restaurant connections: Avenue B, Café Loren, Fathom Seafood House, Fish, Little Fish and Washington Inn. Culinary training: Academy of Culinary Arts, Mays Landing, N.J. First restaurant gig: Age 13, as a busboy at Daniel's Restaurant in Somers Point, N.J. What's new? Mike sold Little Fish and Fathom Seafood House (now East Girard Gastropub) to their respective chefs de cuisine to focus on his newly expanded Fish (1234 Locust St., 215-545-9600, fishphilly.com )
SPORTS
January 6, 2012 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, barkowe@phillynews.com
A CROWD OF 6,850 showed up at Convention Hall in 1963 to watch Lee Shaffer score 31 points in the Sixers' first home game in Philadelphia. There could be triple as many in attendance tonight when this year's young and interesting group takes on the Pistons in the 49th home opener in franchise history. Here's a look at some odds and ends from the team's first home games throughout the years: All-time record: 31-17 Most lopsided win: Over Cleveland, by 24, on Oct. 30, 1981 (128-104)
FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM/FOOD
Philadelphia-area photographer Sabina Louise Pierce was sitting on the patio of the White Dog Cafe one night with Maddie, her wirehair fox terrier, and a thought came to her: "Wouldn't it be great if there was a menu for dogs, instead of 'a bite for me and a bite for her'?" She filed that away. Shortly after the 2007 pet-food recall over melamine, chef Matt Levin, at the time working at Lacroix in the Rittenhouse Hotel, let on that he cooks for his dogs. Pierce approached her friend, the author Kathryn Levy Feldman, with the idea of a cookbook: Pierce's photographs and Feldman's words.
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