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NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Chalk it up to modernization. Or perhaps to the fact that the forces of privatization are on hard on the heels of the state liquor board. Either way, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (LCB) has opened the door, so to speak, to a new way to get your wine and spirits: Home delivery. With no fanfare, the LCB last week rolled out the pilot program to the public. Now customers can select from a limited number of products, and for a fee, order alcohol online and have it shipped directly to them in 3 to 5 days.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - A Senate panel approved a measure Tuesday to broaden and better regulate the home delivery of out-of-state wine to Pennsylvanians, a practice that has slowly evolved but lacked uniform rules. The bill would allow out-of-state wineries to pay $100 for a license to ship wine directly to customers in Pennsylvania. Residents could buy as many as 36 cases a year from a single winery. If the bill becomes law, supporters say, the commonwealth would comply with court rulings striking down the prohibition of out-of-state shipments.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Chalk it up to modernization. Or perhaps to the fact that the forces of privatization are hard on the heels of the state liquor board. Either way, the Liquor Control Board has quietly opened the door, so to speak, to a new way to get your wine and spirits: home delivery. With no fanfare, the LCB last week rolled out the pilot program to the public. Now customers can select from a limited number of products and, for a fee, order alcohol online and have it shipped directly to them in three to five days.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
Expectant mom Margarita Lopez thought the moment had come. The pains were starting. So she went to the hospital yesterday to await the birth of her child. As it turned out, however, the young mother-to-be had false labor pains. It was a false alarm. She went back home. But there was nothing false about the pains she felt this morning. They were as true as Delaney. And thanks in part to three police officers, Delaney Lopez is here and thriving. Delaney's the name of Lopez' baby daughter, delivered by the police officers in the Lopez home.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Meet Joe Smith. Husband. Father of three (ages 6, 11 and 12). Stepfather of two (ages 7 and 13). Banjo player for the Polish American String Band. And milkman. That's right. Milkman. From the Pennsylvania suburbs to the developments dotting South Jersey, metal milk boxes - generally considered artifacts of a bygone era - are being put to their intended use and in some neighborhoods are considered status symbols. And the milkman, thought to be extinct in the age of convenience stores, apparently is more of an endangered species that now looks to be on the verge of returning.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | By Theresa Conroy. Special to The Inquirer
It's 4:30 a.m. A misty sky blankets the manicured lawns of a darkened Huntingdon Valley. Reflections from a crescent moon glimmer on plastic trash bags perched on curbs and on television antennas poking from rooftops. The chugging of the red-and-white Breuninger's milk truck breaks the stillness as it grinds up a small incline. The headlights startle a squirrel bounding across the street, and the truck chugs past it. Ray Franks, 59, yanks up the truck's hand brake, stands and faces the load of products - milk and juice, butter, eggs and bread - all neatly stacked in orange-and-brown crates.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1992 | By Betsy Anderson, FOR THE INQUIRER
While most people slumber, a truck lumbers through the predawn darkness of South Jersey carrying a once-familiar sight: A milkman making home deliveries. Since Oct. 1, Welsh Farms Dairy, of Morris County, N.J., has been serving about 200 home-delivery customers in Mount Holly, Medford, Lumberton, Eastampton and Westampton. "People say they're glad to have it back. They want the service," said Leslie White, operations manager for Welsh Farms. It is among a select group of dairies nationwide, including Rosenberger's Dairies Inc. in Hatfield, that offers home delivery to supplement wholesale operations.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Search the term milkman on Google, and a San Diego mash-up artist appears as the first hit. ("Milkman" plays "electro-hip/hop fusion" music and operates his own lasers.) Kevin Decker, 20, of Voorhees, is the right age to be a Milkman fan, but he's never heard of him. Decker is instead the real thing, something few of the electro-hip/hop generation have ever seen. He is a door-to-door milkman. "I always wear the white shirt," he said last week as he started his afternoon delivery run through Mount Laurel and Marlton.
NEWS
February 14, 2003
WHO IS responsible for choosing the front-page photo? Don't they realize that some people get their paper delivered at home? I don't receive home delivery, but I can only imagine someone walking to the front porch in a bathrobe and slippers on the morning of Feb. 5. If the cold didn't scare them, the sight of Michael Jackson staring at them sure did. Wayne Johnson Philadelphia
BUSINESS
December 3, 1990 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
When Doris Menz wants some Kentucky Fried Chicken, she simply dials the telephone. In less than 30 minutes, she has a hot chicken dinner on the table. For Menz, who has cerebral palsy and is unable to drive, the home delivery service offered by the Millville KFC franchise is a welcome relief. The Millville franchise is the first Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet in the Philadelphia area - and only the fifth nationwide - to offer home delivery since the company began to experiment with it in Louisville, Ky., four years ago. The service in Millville began less than three months ago. "It's a whole new way of thinking about fast food," said Robert Rone of RV Cousins Food, which owns the Millville franchise.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
The food-delivery service GrubHub, which had been acting as a middleman between customers and restaurants since its founding more than a dozen years ago, has started using its own contract couriers in Philadelphia. The move to create its own network here instead of outsourcing delivery follows similar actions by local competitors such as Caviar and Postmates, which delivers nonfood items as well. The Uber-like on-demand services frees restaurants from handling their own deliveries.
NEWS
September 10, 2015
Like the post office - in a good way A recent letter argued that poor home delivery of The Inquirer has hurt readership (Sept. 2). While that may be true in other areas, it has not been in mine. My carrier, Tony Saraceni, has delivered my newspaper for more than 20 years and has been the best I have ever had. He is similar to the Postal Service in that he delivers in rain, sleet, snow, and hail. My news is delivered well before I'm awake, at 5 a.m. My paper is always protected with a plastic bag. If it is rainy, he double-bags the paper to ensure that it is protected.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Madison Russ, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - The Senate approved a bill Wednesday that would let Pennsylvania consumers have wine shipped directly to their homes. The measure, which now heads to the House, allows all wineries to obtain a permit to ship any quantity. Under current law, out-of-state retailers have only been allowed to send wine to a state-run liquor store for residents to pick up. The GOP-led House could vote on the measure as early as next week, said House Republicans spokesman Steve Miskin. Though the bill has support in both parties, drama unfolded on the Senate floor when it came up for debate Wednesday.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE SHOPRITE at Bakers Centre opened just a few weeks ago, but J. Earl Brown, of Germantown, is already hooked. "I'm addicted to your sweet-potato pie," Brown joked to store owner Jeff Brown, who shares his last name but has no relation, as he shopped yesterday. "Pathmark's gonna go out of business. I'm serious. " The sweet-potato pies that keep J. Earl Brown coming back to the Fox Street store, which held its much-anticipated grand opening Aug. 1, are a specialty item at the store, Jeff Brown said.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Search the term milkman on Google, and a San Diego mash-up artist appears as the first hit. ("Milkman" plays "electro-hip/hop fusion" music and operates his own lasers.) Kevin Decker, 20, of Voorhees, is the right age to be a Milkman fan, but he's never heard of him. Decker is instead the real thing, something few of the electro-hip/hop generation have ever seen. He is a door-to-door milkman. "I always wear the white shirt," he said last week as he started his afternoon delivery run through Mount Laurel and Marlton.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A bill that would allow Pennsylvania wine lovers to have out-of-state purchases shipped directly to their homes won unanimous support from the state Senate on Wednesday. But don't dial up your favorite Napa Valley vineyard for door-to-door delivery of its latest Pinot Noir just yet. The bill, which cleared the Senate, 48-0, is about to run up against a veritable legislative blockade in the House. There, Majority Leader Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny), a chief proponent of privatizing liquor sales in the state, says that while he supports direct deliveries, he wants it to be part of his privatization bill.
NEWS
December 4, 2011
Imagine, if you can, not only the repeal of Prohibition, but also the emergence of a vast network of machines known as "the Internet," which will allow free men and women to purchase and take delivery of their favorite wine and spirits without so much as leaving their homes. You no longer need imagine this science-fictional epoch. It has just dawned on Harrisburg, where the "future-crats" of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board have made it so through sheer vision and will to march headlong into the 1990s!
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Chalk it up to modernization. Or perhaps to the fact that the forces of privatization are hard on the heels of the state liquor board. Either way, the Liquor Control Board has quietly opened the door, so to speak, to a new way to get your wine and spirits: home delivery. With no fanfare, the LCB last week rolled out the pilot program to the public. Now customers can select from a limited number of products and, for a fee, order alcohol online and have it shipped directly to them in three to five days.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Chalk it up to modernization. Or perhaps to the fact that the forces of privatization are on hard on the heels of the state liquor board. Either way, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (LCB) has opened the door, so to speak, to a new way to get your wine and spirits: Home delivery. With no fanfare, the LCB last week rolled out the pilot program to the public. Now customers can select from a limited number of products, and for a fee, order alcohol online and have it shipped directly to them in 3 to 5 days.
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