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NEWS
July 18, 1995 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Merrie Baldus started a restaurant with her home-economics students. They cooked, managed a bank account and learned to build up a business. Linda McDuffie founded a mail-order business of decorated pillows with her students. They developed and sewed their own products and built a clientele. "Students work in real teams, in real time, solving real problems," said Baldus, who teaches at Sulzberger Middle School, which is shutting down its home-economics program this year. Baldus and McDuffie were part of a group of teachers, dubbed Concerned Teachers of Home Economics, demanding that the School District stop cutting home- economic programs.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens
See HOME ECONOMICS on C5
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
When Octorara School Superintendent Richard P. McAdams earmarked money to buy computers instead of sewing machines in next year's budget, he took a step that some teachers believe might cut the district's home economics program by half. McAdams' recommendation, which came during a closed meeting last week on the district's proposed $12.1 million budget, was not disclosed until Monday's board meeting, but it prompted an immediate reaction. "I don't deny the need for computers at the intermediate school but I don't understand why it is at the expense of this department," said Karen King, an Octorara home economics teacher, at Monday's meeting.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | Al Heavens
The 1940 census was released by the National Archives in April, offering those interested the opportunity find out where Uncle Fritz and Aunt Bessie grew up. But experts have been privy for many years to information about housing in 1940, when ramped-up war production finally brought an end to the Great Depression. What was it like? Well, 18 percent of housing was in need of major repair. That meant that almost seven million of the 37.4 million dwellings in the United States were dilapidated.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
For about 10 years, Edna W. Macbeth of Mount Airy had been attending family reunions in Virginia or Washington, and for much of that time, she tried to persuade her family to come to her Philadelphia home for its annual reunion. Mrs. Macbeth, a longtime home economics teacher at Roxborough High School, finally succeeded and earlier this week, about 20 family members joined her in Mount Airy for a reunion and to celebrate her 69th birthday. After the reunion and celebration, she and her husband, Robert, decided to drive their daughter, Marion Kelley, home to Evanston, Ill. She never made it. Mrs. Macbeth was killed Tuesday night when the family's car struck a rocky embankment in the westbound lane of Route 80 in Clearfield in Western Pennsylvania, family members said yesterday.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | Al Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Valerie Garfield had a vision 18 years ago that someday - she wasn't sure when - she would own the house one door away from her mother's on South 46th Street. That dream became a reality Jan. 30. The house, which she had been renting for several years, was hers at last. "Look at what God did!" exclaimed Garfield, 52. To which her daughter, Kimberly Johnson, 23, added: "It's about time she got this house. It was really stressing her out. " With assistance from a relaunched city program called Home Buy Now and her longtime employer, the University of Pennsylvania, Garfield was able to buy the house for $50,000, cover closing costs, and have enough left over to pay for some much-needed improvements.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
Today's home-economics class is as much about the consumer as the product and service being consumed. Rance Bell of Burlington Township has 26 years of service with the Air Force behind him, the first six as a German-speaking linguist and the rest as a readiness superintendent for the Sixth Airlift Squadron at Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lakehurst. On a sunny Tuesday morning, standing as he is able in his dining room as he recuperates from foot surgery, the retired master sergeant is extolling the virtues of home-automation technology, for which he pays $55 a month to Vivint, his Utah-based provider.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
It is painfully clear to many experts that a large number of Americans are, for want of a better description, having trouble handling money. Record foreclosures in the last six years are an indication that something is seriously wrong. It's not just about housing, however, said Kimberly Henry, a housing counselor at Mount Airy USA, a community-development corporation in northwest Philadelphia. But that is where the lack of "financial fitness" is most evident to her. Henry's job is to get folks ready to buy a home - the pre-purchase counseling that national and local studies have shown help keep people in their houses for the long term.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
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NEWS
April 26, 2013
IN WHAT MAY go down as his greatest "wild-hair" moment, Mayor Nutter told the U.S. Olympic Committee - don't start laughing yet - that the city wants to host the 2024 Olympic Games. (I suspect he wants to see a bicycle race that's not on a city sidewalk.) He's found $20 billion under the cushions of his office sofa? I know we've decriminalized marijuana, but . . . Our police force will provide airtight security when it can't keep track of its own guns? We fail to collect from tax deadbeats, but will raise billions?
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Miriam Cosand Ward, 96, a Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Camden County home economist who in the 1970s taught thousands of New Jerseyans how to sew, plan meala, and run a household, died of congestive heart failure on Sunday, Dec. 23, at her home at Medford Leas, a continuing care retirement community. Mrs. Ward had been a champion of good nutrition and a mentor to future homemakers since graduating from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind., in 1937. After carrying a double major in mathematics and home economics, she chose the latter career path, and stuck with it until her retirement in 1980.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The telephone began ringing nonstop in public insurance adjuster Ira Straff's Bala Cynwyd office Monday afternoon, even as Hurricane Sandy was spinning off the New Jersey coast, looking for a place to land. On Thursday afternoon, Straff, president of the Insurance Adjustment Bureau, a 48-year-old firm that represents property owners in negotiating claims settlements with insurance companies, was in his office, having spent the last three days "walking through muck" all over the region.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
Teena Watson, a single mother of two now back in Philadelphia after living in Erie, saw a homeless shelter as her only option. "I came back to go to school, get a job, and try to get a better life for my children," Chanel, 7, and Nakeya, 2, Watson said. But everywhere she turned, nothing appeared to be available that she could afford and that could accommodate her disability - she is hearing-impaired and told her story through interpreter Crystal Blue, of the Society for Helping Church.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
Today's home-economics class is as much about the consumer as the product and service being consumed. Rance Bell of Burlington Township has 26 years of service with the Air Force behind him, the first six as a German-speaking linguist and the rest as a readiness superintendent for the Sixth Airlift Squadron at Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lakehurst. On a sunny Tuesday morning, standing as he is able in his dining room as he recuperates from foot surgery, the retired master sergeant is extolling the virtues of home-automation technology, for which he pays $55 a month to Vivint, his Utah-based provider.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
AS A CHILD, Hermione Clark Hill had to take a train and a horse-drawn carriage to get to the campus of what is now Cheyney University in Delaware County. Of course, that was 1913, and the school was called Cheyney Normal School. Her father, Leslie Pinckney Hill, a prominent African-American educator, community leader and poet, was president. Those were exciting times for the young Hermione. She was the daughter of a nationally known figure whose prominence transcended race, and the family was living in a historic home, the president's house, called Melrose, dating to 1785.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
If now were then, maybe Rady Sin and Saron Saom of Philadelphia wouldn't have spent the last few years as mortgage borrowers in trouble, and maybe they wouldn't have fallen prey to a scammer offering help at a high price and delivering nothing. When the city temporarily relocated their food cart from 30th and Market Streets to Chestnut Street and business fell off dramatically, the Cambodian couple began falling behind on their mortgage payments to Bank of America. "I talked and gave [Bank of America]
BUSINESS
October 6, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
If your furnace is 15 years old or more, now might be the right time to exchange it for a more efficient model. The obvious reason is to reduce your energy costs, keeping in mind that winter is on its way. Data from the U.S. Department of Energy show that if your current furnace has an AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency) rating of 50 percent, one with 90 percent will save you $44.24 a year on every $100 you now spend on fuel costs. In addition, upgrading your furnace or boiler from 56 percent to 90 percent efficiency in an average cold-climate house will save 1.5 tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year if you heat with gas, 2.5 tons if you heat with oil. But financial and environmental considerations are only part of the story.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
Good credit is important, especially when you're looking to buy a house. Mortgage lenders have to know whether you're able to repay the debt, and have to determine through your credit history whether you're willing to pay, as well. They use credit scores to determine, statistically, how much of a loan you can afford, whether to approve it, and the interest rate. The scores are obtained from the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. The most common credit score issued is the FICO, named for Fair Isaac Co., which developed the mathematical formula.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens
If you tried to get a mortgage last year and failed, or were put through the wringer first, you are in good company. Of the 11.7 million mortgages applications received by lenders in 2011, only 7.1 million resulted in loan originations, data on transactions covered by the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act show. About 2.9 million loans were purchased for sale to investors on the secondary market. The act, approved in 1975, requires lending institutions to report public loan data.
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