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Home Economics

NEWS
October 15, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Marion Jeanne Bell, 85, an associate professor at Immaculata University for more than 30 years, died of pneumonia Thursday at Camilla Hall, the retirement residence of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, in Immaculata, Chester County. Sister Marion Jeanne joined the Immaculata faculty in 1973. During her tenure, she developed and coordinated the undergraduate program in dietetics, the study of nutrition and diet. She also chaired the home-economics department; was director of Immaculata's continuing-education program; and administered the school's dietary manager's correspondence course.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Miriam Cosand Ward, 96, a Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Camden County home economist who in the 1970s taught thousands of New Jerseyans how to sew, plan meala, and run a household, died of congestive heart failure on Sunday, Dec. 23, at her home at Medford Leas, a continuing care retirement community. Mrs. Ward had been a champion of good nutrition and a mentor to future homemakers since graduating from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind., in 1937. After carrying a double major in mathematics and home economics, she chose the latter career path, and stuck with it until her retirement in 1980.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
An African pancake called Enjera, chicken curry and pineapple punch will be just some of the dishes that students at Sun Valley High School will be serving tomorrow as part of the observance of World Food Day. The day was established by the United Nations eight years ago to draw attention to world hunger problems. At Sun Valley, the students will be selling tickets to their banquet. The money will go to local food banks. The idea was the brainchild of first-year home economics teacher Marci Jo Mongeau, who has had firsthand experience dealing with world hunger.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's not just "stitch and stir" anymore. It's "enviro shopping," and computerized clothes-making and the danger of radon in the home. The days of apron-sewing and casserole-assembling classes filled solely with girls are long past, and today's home economics teachers like it that way. "We're not just cooking and sewing . . . we've always covered so many other areas," said Renee Debrowski. "We don't want to be thought of so narrowly. " Debrowski, who teaches home economics in Vernon, was among 92 home ec teachers from around the state who gathered at Rowan College yesterday to talk about their field and how it has changed.
NEWS
July 22, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jadwiga Kulpinska Bogucka, 93, formerly of Torresdale, a passionate supporter of Polish culture, died Sunday at Sunrise Assisted Living in Yardley. She was listening to music by her beloved Polish composer, Frederic Chopin, when she died, her son, Peter Bogucki, said. Mrs. Bogucka was active with the Polish Intercollegiate Club and the Associated Polish Home in Philadelphia; sang with the Paderewski Choral Society; arranged speakers for the Polski Uniwersytet Ludowy (the Polish People's University)
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | By William N. Schultz, Special to The Inquirer
Future Homemakers of America. Does the name of this organization conjure up any special images? There's Mom, a Betty Crocker lookalike, whipping up some brownies in the kitchen with ponytailed Sis, while Junior watches Hopalong Cassidy on the Muntz TV in the living room just as Dad rolls up to the carport in the family Studebaker after a hard day's work. This picture, if it ever existed, has long since faded away. Institutions change and the Future Homemakers of America - a nonprofit organization founded just before the end of World War II to promote home economics within the nation's school systems - is no exception.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than 60 people turned out last night for the final public hearing on a proposed $6.3-million middle school expansion project. Voters will decide Tuesday whether or not to allow the district to sell bonds to pay for the addition to the 37-year-old school building. District officials contend the addition is necessary to accommodate a growing student population and to meet state standards for classroom size and curriculum. Presently, classrooms in the Westampton Middle School hold an average of 32 students.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Oaklyn Board of Education has reinstated home economics and industrial arts at the Oaklyn School on a part-time basis. Both programs were slated to be cut under a preliminary budget that the board approved Feb. 3. "When we found the resources to do it, we didn't have any problem reinstating it on a part-time basis," said school board member Frank Lengetti. Currently, some ninth-grade students have shop or home economics every day, said Superintendent Henry Linder. Although schedules have not been drawn up for next year, he said he expected students to have the classes as often as several times a week for a limited cycle - possibly six weeks.
NEWS
May 1, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sara Schwass Danehower, 92, of Lansdale, a home economics teacher and 4-H Club leader who organized a Girl Scout troop for the handicapped, died Wednesday, April 28, of heart failure at her home. Mrs. Danehower graduated from North Wales High School, where she met her future husband, Robert G. Danehower. She earned a bachelor's degree in home economics from Drexel University. In 1944, she and her husband married, and that year she began teaching in the North Penn School District.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paulette Nannos Bradley, 58, of Newtown Square, a former school principal and home economics teacher, died of complications from melanoma Wednesday, Feb. 2, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. For 15 years, Dr. Bradley was principal of Norwood School in the Interboro School District. After becoming head of the school in 1995, she hired new staff and test scores rose, her husband, Charles, said. She retired as principal in June and had planned to start a new career in January at Widener University, supervising student teachers.
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